Nebraska teen accepted to all five military academies; sets out to serve America

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Noble Rassmussen holding military hats

By Angelica Stabile, FOX News

High school senior Noble Rasmussen intends to serve his country well — and all five U.S. military academies seem to agree.

The Nebraska teen joined “Fox & Friends” on Friday to celebrate his acceptance to all five academies.

He then announced on the program that he’ll be attending the United States Air Force Academy in June.

Rasmussen, a cadet with the Civil Air Patrol, said that his interest in applying to each school was sparked from a desire to represent and serve the United States as a whole.

“I want to serve my country the best I can,” he said. “So applying to all academies [presented] the option to serve anywhere.”

“I feel like it’s my duty to serve my country.”

VIDEO: Watch the interview on FOX & Friends

While the “noble” sentiment of military service complements Rasmussen’s first name nicely, his mother, Cheri Rasmussen, said that was his parents’ exact intention when they named him.

“Our prayer for him his whole life was just to have that noble character of honor, honesty and integrity,” she said. “Just to kind of rise above and have that high moral principle.”

“God has blessed us with that, and we see those qualities of leadership and maturity in Noble.”

Continue to Fox News to read the complete article.

Best Tech Majors for High Paying Jobs

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Business man pointing finger towards computer screen with a flash of light surrounding screen and his hands on the keyboard

Your military service has prepared you for a lot. You have a desirable skillset that can be used in any work environment, you’re entitled to generous financial aid, and you have a perspective that can positively contribute to the workforce.

What’s the best career for you to apply your skills?

If you’re one of the many veterans looking to return to school but unsure about what major to pick, consider majoring in a tech field. Tech jobs are not only high-paying, diverse, secure and consistently growing, but these fields have experience in veteran hiring and recruiting practices.

Here are some of the most popular tech majors for veterans:

Computer and Information Technology:
Information technology (IT) is the use of computers to create, process, store, retrieve and exchange all kinds of data and information. Employment in computer and information technology occupations is projected to grow 13 percent from 2020 to 2030, faster than the average for all occupations.

Popular Information Technology Careers:
■ IT Analyst
■ IT Technician
■ Data Scientist
■ Systems Analyst
Those in the information technology field make an average salary of about $97,430, which is higher than the median annual wage for all occupations by about $52,000.

Web Development:
Web developers create and maintain websites. They are also responsible for the site’s technical aspects, such as its performance and capacity, which are measures of a website’s speed and how much traffic the site can handle. Web developers may also create content for the site. Jobs in this field are expected to grow by 13 percent, about double the average rate for all other occupations.

Popular Web Development Careers:
■ Digital Design
■ Application Developer
■ Computer Programming
■ Front-End and Back-End Development
■ Webmaster
Web designers make an average of about $77,200 per year.

Database Management:
Database administrators and architects create or organize systems to store and secure a variety of data, such as financial information and customer shipping records. They also make sure that the data is available to authorized users. Most big-name companies utilize database administration, offering employment at companies of all backgrounds and environments. Jobs in this field are growing at a steady rate of about eight percent.

Popular Database Management Careers:
■ Database Engineer
■ Database Manager
■ Cybersecurity
■ Security Engineer
The average salary for database management is about $98,860 per year.

Software Development:
Software developers create computer applications that allow users to do specific tasks and the underlying systems that run devices or control networks. They create, maintain and upgrade software to meet the needs of their clients. Jobs in this field are growing extremely fast at about 22 percent.

Popular Software Development Careers:
■ Software Engineer
■ Full-stack Developer
■ Quality Assurance Analyst
■ App Developer
■ System Software Developer
The average salary for software development is about $110,140 per year.

Sources: Indeed.com, BLS,

Questions to Ask Before Selecting a School

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Female soldier with books on USA flag background

Before applying for the first college that comes to mind, consider your goals to determine what you need from higher education.

While most colleges and universities offer an excellent education, many factors can contribute to your overall experience.

Some universities may be in undesirable locations, not provide the full benefits you could receive as a veteran or might not have the best program for your desired major.

Is this school accredited?

Accreditation is a process where a recognized group (an accreditor) looks at a school’s education program and decides whether it meets an acceptable quality standard. When choosing your school, you’ll want to confirm that it meets this accreditation status. If you attend a school that does not meet that accreditation status, you may be unable to transfer to a different school or obtain the specific courses you need to graduate. Schools that are not accredited are also not eligible to utilize federal funding programs.

What type of institution is this?

You have some options regarding the types of schools you might consider. A college or university might be a public, nonprofit (sometimes called “private”) or for-profit institution. The category can affect what you might be able to study and how much you’ll pay. Your post-9/11 GI Bill benefits make you an appealing candidate — especially to for-profit schools. Still, you’ll want to ensure that the school is more interested in giving you the education you need than the funds they receive from your enrollment. Typically, schools are differentiated by the following:

Public and nonprofit universities:

  • Usually accredited
  • Not owned by an individual or business
  • Offer a variety of majors
  • Strive to help students learn

For-profit universities:

  • Not always accredited
  • Owned by a person or business
  • Often focuses on a few majors or areas of study
  • Money driven

Does this school cover my needs for my major?

Start by researching the “top schools” for your major of interest to narrow down a list. Many schools may offer the major you want to pursue, but not all of them will have the same resources, training and opportunities you’ll need to get the best education possible. Look into your area of focus at the schools you’re interested in and see which ones offer the most extensive benefits.

How else does this school compare?

Just because a school offers your desired major or has the best program for your future career doesn’t mean the school is the best fit for you. Some schools produce more graduating students, have higher acceptance rates and better utilize your GI Bill benefits than others. Compare your top schools to see which one can best accommodate all of these needs. Some other things to consider:

  • What is the graduation rate at this school?
  • Will my GI benefits cover all of the costs?
  • Are there opportunities for internships?

Does this school offer the Yellow Ribbon Program?

The Yellow Ribbon Program can help you pay for the higher out-of-state, private, overseas or graduate school tuition and fees that the Post-9 /11 GI Bill doesn’t cover. Depending on your educational and career goals, choosing a school that utilizes the Yellow Ribbon Program may be the best move to save you money and find an institution that understands the needs of veterans. To find a list of schools offering the Yellow Ribbon Program this year, visit va.gov, and search for Yellow Ribbon.

How will this school support you as a veteran?

As a veteran, you have life experiences that not everyone else can relate you. Your college campus is going to be a place where you’ll be spending a large portion of your time. Why not make it a place that meets more than your educational needs? Look into the kinds of veteran programs and supports that your school offers. Do they have a chapter of the Student Veterans of America? Do other veterans attend this school? What kinds of extracurricular activities or clubs do they have? This might not seem like the most critical aspect of choosing a school but having a support system can be extremely helpful regardless of the educational path you decide to take.

Sources: Federal Trade Commission Consumer Advice, Military Consumer, VA

Choosing a Major? Join the Tech Field

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young man walking with backpack and laptop in hand

Your military service has prepared you for a lot. You have a desirable skillset that can be used in any work environment, you’re entitled to generous financial aid, and you have a perspective that can positively contribute to the workforce. What’s the best career for you to apply your skills?

If you’re one of the many veterans looking to return to school but unsure about what major to pick, consider majoring in a tech field.

Tech jobs are not only high-paying, diverse, secure and consistently growing, but these fields have experience in veteran hiring and recruiting practices.

Here are some of the most popular tech majors for veterans:

Computer and Information Technology: Information technology (IT) is the use of computers to create, process, store, retrieve and exchange all kinds of data and information. Employment in computer and information technology occupations is projected to grow 13 percent from 2020 to 2030, faster than the average for all occupations.

Popular Information Technology Careers:

  • IT Analyst
  • IT Technician
  • Data Scientist
  • Systems Analyst

Those in the information technology field make an average salary of about $97,430, which is higher than the median annual wage for all occupations by about $52,000.

Web Development: Web developers create and maintain websites. They are also responsible for the site’s technical aspects, such as its performance and capacity, which are measures of a website’s speed and how much traffic the site can handle. Web developers may also create content for the site. Jobs in this field are expected to grow by 13 percent, about double the average rate for all other occupations.

Popular Web Development Careers:

  • Digital Design
  • Application Developer
  • Computer Programming
  • Front-End and Back-End Development
  • Webmaster

Web designers make an average of about $77,200 per year.

Database Management: Database administrators and architects create or organize systems to store and secure a variety of data, such as financial information and customer shipping records. They also make sure that the data is available to authorized users. Most big-name companies utilize database administration, offering employment at companies of all backgrounds and environments. Jobs in this field are growing at a steady rate of about eight percent.

Popular Database Management Careers:

  • Database Engineer
  • Database Manager
  • Cybersecurity
  • Security Engineer

The average salary for database management is about $98,860 per year.

Software Development:

Software developers create computer applications that allow users to do specific tasks and the underlying systems that run devices or control networks. They create, maintain and upgrade software to meet the needs of their clients. Jobs in this field are growing extremely fast at about 22 percent.

Popular Software Development Careers:

  • Software Engineer
  • Full-stack Developer
  • Quality Assurance Analyst
  • App Developer
  • System Software Developer

The average salary for software development is about $110,140 per year.

Sources: Indeed.com, BLS, Wikipedia

Military spouses can now apply for ‘game changing’ employment program

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woman veteran searching online with her laptop on table

By Karen Jowers

More than 500 military spouses have registered for a new paid fellowship program, applying to be placed with civilian companies seeking full-time employees.

The Military Spouse Career Accelerator Pilot program is free to employers, and spouses will be paid by the Defense Department during their 12-week fellowships.

It’s open to spouses of currently serving members of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force and Space Force, to include active, reserve and National Guard components. Spouses can find information about how to apply at the Military OneSource Spouse Education and Career Opportunities website. MySECO has a variety of resources and programs to help spouses.

DoD officials announced the launch of the three-year pilot program Thursday, but registration opened for military spouses on Dec. 23. More than 800 spouses have initiated the first step of the registration process; of those, 500 have completed the registration, said DoD spokesman Army Maj. Charlie Dietz.

Military spouses typically move every two, three or four years, and their unemployment rate hovers around 21%, much higher than in the civilian community.

Companies interested in applying to participate can learn more and sign up on the Hiring Our Heroes website, in partnership with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation. Through Dec. 31, 25 employers had registered to participate in the pilot program, Dietz said.

DoD officials expect the first cohort of spouses will be placed with participating employers this month. The pilot program will run for three years and applications will be accepted throughout those three years. Employers can also apply to participate on a rolling basis throughout the length of the program.

Spouses who are accepted will participate in a 12-week paid fellowship program with training and mentoring. They’ll be placed with host companies that match their location, education and work experience, employer needs and other factors.

DoD officials expect the first cohort of spouses will be placed with participating employers this month. The pilot program will run for three years and applications will be accepted throughout those three years. Employers can also apply to participate on a rolling basis throughout the length of the program.

Spouses who are accepted will participate in a 12-week paid fellowship program with training and mentoring. They’ll be placed with host companies that match their location, education and work experience, employer needs and other factors.

Read the complete article on Military Times.

Oldest living Pearl Harbor survivor marks 105th birthday

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Joseph Eskenazi and large family

By Kevin McGill, The Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — Flag-waving admirers lined the sidewalk outside the National World War II Museum in New Orleans on Wednesday to greet the oldest living survivor of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor as he marked his upcoming 105th birthday.

“It feels great,” Joseph Eskenazi of Redondo Beach, California, told reporters after posing for pictures with his great-grandson, who is about to turn 5, his 21-month-old great-granddaughter and six other World War II veterans, all in their 90s.

Eskenazi turns 105 on Jan. 30. He had boarded an Amtrak train in California on Friday for the journey to New Orleans. The other veterans, representing the Army, Navy and Marines, flew in for the event.

(Pictured) World War II veteran Joseph Eskenazi, who at 104 years and 11 months old is the oldest living veteran to survive the attack on Pearl Harbor, sits with fellow veterans, his great grandchildren Mathias, 4, Audrey, 1, and their grandmother Belinda Mastrangelo, at an event celebrating his upcoming 105th birthday at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans, Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2023. (Gerald Herbert/AP)

They were visiting thanks to the Soaring Valor Program, a project of actor Gary Sinise’s charitable foundation dedicated to aiding veterans and first responders. The program arranges trips to the museum for World War II veterans and their guardians.

Eskenazi was a private first class in the Army when the attack occurred. His memories include being awakened when a bomb fell — but didn’t explode — near where he was sleeping at Schofield Barracks, reverberating explosions as the battleship USS Arizona was sunk by Japanese bombs, and machine gun fire from enemy planes kicking up dust around him after he volunteered to drive a bulldozer across a field so it could be used to clear runways.

“I don’t even know why — my hand just went up when they asked for volunteers,” Eskenazi said. “Nobody else raised their hand because they knew that it meant death. … I did it unconsciously.”

He was at the Army’s Schofield Barracks when the Dec. 7, 1941, attack began, bringing the United States into the war. About 2,400 servicemen were killed.

Eskenazi and his fellow veterans lined up for pictures amid exhibits of World War II aircraft and Higgins boats, designed for beach landings.

Read the complete article on Military Times.

The Yellow Ribbon Program Has Expanded

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Yellow Ribbon Program

What You Need to Know:

If you’re eligible for the maximum benefit rate under the Post-9/11 GI Bill, but still need additional funding, you might already be aware of the advantages of the Yellow Ribbon Program.

For the 2022-2023 school year, these benefits have expanded to offer additional coverage to active-duty service members and spouses using transferred benefits of an active-duty service member.

What you should know:

What is the maximum amount covered by the GI Bill?

For the 2022-2023 school year (August 31, 2022‑July 1, 2023) the maximum amount is $26,361.37.

I wasn’t eligible last year, am I eligible now?

Besides meeting the maximum benefits requirements under the Post-9/11 GI Bill, you must identify with one of the following to qualify for the Yellow Ribbon Program:

  • Served an aggregate period of at least 36 months on active duty and were honorably discharged
  • You received a Purple Heart on or after September 11, 2001, and were honorably discharged after any amount of service
  • You served at least 30 continuous days (all at once, without a break) on or after September 11, 2001, and were discharged or released from active duty for a service-connected disability
  • You’re a dependent child using benefits transferred by a veteran
  • You’re a Fry Scholar

As of August 1, 2022, active-duty service members and spouses using transferred benefits may now partake in the Yellow Ribbon program, as long as they identify with one of the two situations:

  • You’re an active-duty service member who has served at least 36 months on active duty (either all at once or with breaks in service)
  • You’re a spouse using the transferred benefits of an active-duty service member who has served at least 36 months on active duty

How do I transfer my benefits to my spouse?

If you have already transferred your Post-9/11 GI Bill Benefits to your spouse/dependent and they meet the necessary qualifications for the Yellow Ribbon program, then they should already be eligible for the Yellow Ribbon Program as of August 2022.

What is the application process?

If you submit an application for the Post-9/11 GI Bill to VA and are eligible at the 100 percent benefit level, VA will issue you a Certificate of Eligibility advising that you are potentially eligible for the Yellow Ribbon Program. You should provide your Certificate of Eligibility to your school which, in turn, will determine if there are slots available for the Yellow Ribbon Program (based on its agreement with the VA).

If your school has already sent us an enrollment certification, and it is processed at the same time as your application, your award letter will also display your benefit level. The school is responsible for notifying you whether or not you are accepted and approved for the Yellow Ribbon Program. The school then submits an enrollment form to VA, certifying information that is used to make payment to the school for tuition and fees and for Yellow Ribbon Program payments.

What fees will be covered?

All mandatory fees for a student’s program of education may be included. Any fees that are not mandatory, such as room and board, study abroad (unless the study abroad course is a requirement for the degree program) and penalty fees (such as late registration, return check fees and parking fines) cannot be included. These fees are not payable under the Yellow Ribbon Program or under the Post-9/11 GI Bill.

For more information on the Yellow Ribbon Program and how to apply, visit benefits.va.gov.

Source: Department of Veterans Affairs

Applications Now Open for the 2023 Patriot Scholarship

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veteran student

U.S. Army student veterans can apply for one of two $10,000 scholarships

Raytheon Missiles & Defense, a business of Raytheon Technologies, in partnership with Student Veterans of America (SVA), is now accepting applications for the 2023 Raytheon Patriot Scholarship.Two $10,000 scholarships will be awarded to student veterans under this educational program, which honors those who served in the U.S. Army.

The scholarship, which carries the name of the company’s Patriot Air and Missile Defense System, is designed to help returning soldiers achieve educational goals that can lead to success in their civilian lives. The scholarships will be awarded to Army student veterans pursuing an undergraduate or graduate degree at an accredited university.

“It’s a privilege to support and recognize veterans who demonstrate the best in academic excellence and leadership in their communities,” said Tom Laliberty, president of Land Warfare & Air Defense, a business unit of Raytheon Missiles & Defense.  “It’s one of many ways we are helping them prepare for a successful transition from active military service to civilian life.”

The Patriot Scholarship first launched in 2015 and is part of Raytheon’s broader commitment to supporting military service men and women.

All applicants will receive the opportunity to attend resume and networking workshops led by the company’s military hiring team, as well as connect with hiring managers for internship or career opportunities.

Army student veterans interested in the annual Raytheon Patriot Scholarship can now apply at Raytheon Missiles & Defense Patriot Scholarship – Student Veterans of America®. The application process will remain open until April 7, 2023.

Great Jobs for Veterans You May Not Have Considered

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air traffic controller looking out tower wimndow with headphones on

Law enforcement, IT management and the medical field are all career fields that you’ve been told are great for veterans. And while these jobs are fantastic for transitioning veterans in almost every way, they are far from the only options veterans can pursue in their post-military life. Suppose you’re looking for a career different from the “veteran norm” while still providing job security and reasonable salaries. In that case, one of these unique career profiles might be for you:

Dental Hygienist

Job Description: Dental hygienists examine patients for signs of oral diseases, such as gingivitis, and provide preventive care, including oral hygiene.

They also educate patients about oral health. Their job tasks usually include teeth cleaning, taking x-rays, assessing oral health and documenting patient care.

Desired Skillset:

  • Critical thinking
  • Communication
  • Problem-solving skills
  • Dexterity

Education: Dental hygienists typically need an associate degree in dental hygiene; they may also get a bachelor’s degree. Programs usually take three years to complete and offer laboratory, clinical and classroom instruction. Areas of study include anatomy, medical ethics and periodontics — the study of gum disease.

Annual Salary: $77,810

Air Traffic Controller

Job Description: Air traffic controllers coordinate the movement of aircraft to maintain safe distances between them. They manage the flow of aircraft into and out of the airport airspace, guide pilots during takeoff and landing and monitor aircraft as they travel through the skies.

Desired Skillset:

  • Communication
  • Multi-tasking
  • Decision-making skills
  • Math proficiency

Education: Candidates who want to become air traffic controllers typically need an associate or bachelor’s degree, often from an AT-CTI program. Bachelor’s degree fields vary; examples include transportation, business or engineering. Other candidates must have three years of progressively responsible work experience, have completed four years of college or have a combination of both.

Annual Salary: $129,750

School Principal

Job Description: Elementary, middle and high school principals oversee all school operations, including daily activities. They coordinate curriculums, manage staff and provide students with a safe and productive learning environment. In public schools, principals also implement standards and programs set by the school district and state and federal regulations. They evaluate and prepare reports based on these standards by assessing their school’s student achievement and teacher performance.

Desired Skillset:

  • Interpersonal skills
  • Leadership
  • Problem-solving skills
  • Communication

Education: Principals typically need a master’s degree in education leadership or education administration. These master’s degree programs teach prospective principals how to manage staff, create budgets, set goals and work with parents and the community. Principals also need teaching experience.

Annual Salary: $98,870

Wind Turbine Technician

Job Description: Wind turbine service technicians, also known as windtechs, install, maintain and repair wind turbines. They are usually responsible for inspecting wind turbine towers’ exterior and physical integrity, performing maintenance and repairs and collecting turbine data.

Desired Skillset:

  • Physical strength
  • Physical stamina
  • Troubleshooting skills
  • Detail-oriented

Education: Most windtechs learn their trade by attending technical schools or community colleges, where they typically complete certificates in wind energy technology. However, some workers choose to earn an associate degree. Windtechs usually acquire knowledge in mechanical systems, computers, electrical and hydraulic maintenance, first aid, rescue and safety and CPR.

Annual Salary: $56,260

Railroad Workers

Job Description: Railroad workers ensure that passenger and freight trains run on time and travel safely. Some workers drive trains, some coordinate the activities of the trains and others operate signals and switches in the rail yard.

Desired Skillset:

  • Customer-service skills
  • Hearing and visual ability
  • Hand-eye coordination
  • Leadership skills

Education: Rail companies typically require workers to have a high school diploma or equivalent. However, employers may prefer to hire workers with postsecondary education, such as coursework, a certificate, or an associate or bachelor’s degree. Locomotive engineers and conductors must be certified by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA).

Annual Salary: $64,150

Sources: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Trade-schools.net

How ABC’s Stephanie Ramos Built Her Journalism Career While Serving In The U.S. Army

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ABC’s Stephanie Ramos sits in her anchor chair smiling

I’ve always known that I wanted to be a reporter. I started watching the news around 10th grade, and I was a big fan of WNBC. I learned that you could make so much of an impact on people’s lives as a reporter, and that really motivated me.

So, as soon as I got to college, I declared my major as broadcast journalism. While I was still in undergrad, 9/11 happened. As a native New Yorker, I wanted to do something for my country; I wanted to be a part of something bigger, and I was drawn to the military.

I initially planned to join the Marines, but I ran into an Army recruiter before my decision was final, and they were able to offer me a schedule that worked better for pursuing my education and military service at the same time. I started as an enlisted soldier; then, after completing basic training and receiving my master’s degree in mass communication and media studies, I was commissioned and became a public affairs officer. I started out as a private; now, I’m a major in the Army Reserve.

I moved my way up the ranks while moving around the country: in South Carolina, I worked as an assignment editor for WIS-TV; in Kansas, as a television news reporter for WIBW-TV; in Missouri, as an anchor for KMBC; in Washington, D.C., as a multi-platform reporter for ABC.

During that time, I remained in the Reserve, reporting to units that corresponded with each new location, participating in training exercises and taking military courses. In 2008, while I was in Kansas, I deployed to Baghdad for the first time for a year, serving as a historical ambassador at Camp Slayer in Victory Base Complex.

Initially, finding out I was being deployed was a shock, but I also knew that that’s what I signed up for. I had about a month to pack everything up, tell my employer, then take off. My employer was very understanding; we even did a lot of stories about me leaving: the process and the steps you have to take to put your civilian life on hold before deploying to another country.

Being away from home was hard at first; it was lonely. What I tried to keep in mind during that year was not to become complacent. While deployed, I volunteered with the Iraqi Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, which was the most meaningful experience to me; they were so aware that they were in the middle of a war—they knew why we were there—and still, they just had so much joy. I could never get over that.

A lot of the luxuries that we have here, you don’t have over there. I realized that I don’t need much, as long as I have my health and my routine.

Eventually, when I returned home, I settled into my current role as an ABC News national correspondent, covering stories that range from military issues—including the murder of Vanessa Guillén, a 20-year-old U.S. soldier who went missing in April 2020 and was later found to have been killed by fellow solider Aaron David Robinson inside an armory at Fort Hood, Texas—to mental health crises in Latinx communities to Miss USA cheating allegations.

Balancing two careers at the same time has been challenging, but my time in the military is also what helped me in the news business. Anything can be thrown my way, and I’m just like, “Everyone calm down, we can do this. It’s okay.”

Read the complete article originally posted on Women’s Health Magazine here.

U.S. Veterans Magazine Wins Two Awards in One Week

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Tonya Kinsey smiles while holding award in her hands

U.S. Veterans Magazine, the premier resource magazine for transitioning service members, service-disabled veterans, veteran business owners and their spouses and families, has been awarded two prestigious awards in just one week.

The first award was received on November 7th from Veterans Legal Institute (VLI). Each year, VLI reviews the contributions given by their partners and chooses a group to recognize for their continual support of veterans. This year, U.S. Veterans Magazine was the recipient of VLI’s Community Partner of the Year award for its dedication and contribution to veterans.

The second award was received just a few days later, on November 9th from the National Veteran Business Development Council (NVBDC). Every year, the Board of Officers at NVBDC reviews the activity of their corporations, members, certified veterans and partners, and recognizes individuals and groups for their dedication to going above and beyond to support veterans. This year, U.S. Veterans Magazine and its Partnerships Division Lead, Tonya Kinsey, were the recipients of the Media Partner of the Year Award.

“I am extremely proud of the work U.S. Veterans Magazine is doing through important organizations that value our veterans and give them vital resources when they most need them,” Kinsey stated of the honor, “I have worked closely with both organizations to help them expand their platform and highlight their stories.  We truly value their partnerships and are honored to have received recognition from both organizations!”

“We are so honored to receive these awards from these two veteran-focused organizations,” U.S. Veterans Magazine Publisher and Founder, Mona Lisa Faris, said of the awards. “Our partnership with each of these organizations works so well because our mission statements align. We were created to help veterans advance and both VLI and the NVBDC have the same goal.”

About U.S. Veterans Magazine

U.S. Veterans Magazine (USVM) is the premier resource magazine for transitioning service members, service-disabled veterans, veteran business owners and their spouses and families. USVM is the link between the qualified students, career and business candidates from the ranks of our nation’s veteran organizations, educational institutions, corporate America and the federal government. We provide our readers with relevant and timely information about employment, recruitment, supplier diversity, education, wellness and benefits. We recognize the immense value veterans offer as employees, and link job seekers with companies eager to hire them. Our publication connects entrepreneurs with opportunities to grow their businesses, and for those seeking educational prospects and scholarships, we share the information they need to support their academic success. Visit our official website at https://usveteransmagazine.com/

About Veterans Legal Institute (VLI)

Veterans Legal Institute® (VLI) is an organization that provides pro bono legal assistance to homeless, disabled, at risk and low-income service members with opportunities for healthcare, housing, education, employment and more. VLI is dedicated to help current and former service members foster a sense of self-sufficiency for the future. To learn more, visit their official website at https://www.vetslegal.com/

About the National Veteran Business Development Council (NVBDC)

The National Veteran Business Development Council (NVBDC) is the original Veteran-Owned Business Certification organization developed by veterans, for veterans. The NVBDC is dedicated to providing credible and reliable certifying authority for veteran-owned businesses of all sizes to ensure that valid documentation exists for veteran status, ownership and operational control. The organization even offers a FASTRACK process, allowing businesses who are already certified with other certifiers to qualify for Veteran-Owned Business Certification in as little as 30 days. To learn more, visit their website at https://nvbdc.org/

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