Indian Motorcycle And Veterans Charity Ride Mark 7th Annual Motorcycle Therapy Adventure To Sturgis

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Group of motorcycle riders gather around two mororcycles and a disabled veteran with a prosthetic leg

Indian Motorcycle®, America’s First Motorcycle Company, today announced its continued support and sponsorship of the seventh annual Veterans Charity Ride (VCR) to Sturgis. The two have partnered with the initiative of “America Get Out & Ride” while using motorcycle therapy to support combat veterans’ transition to civilian life.

Many of the veterans joining the Veterans Charity Ride for the first time are amputees, paraplegics, or suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress and other issues veterans face after leaving the military. Each new veteran will pair with mentors who have already been through the Veterans Charity Ride program and receive one-on-one support to help their transition back to civilian life. The 2021 ride will include 16 total veterans – eight new, along with eight returning veterans who will serve as mentors.

“Veterans Charity Ride was designed to assist combat veterans who face challenges in their daily living and provide them with a support structure that will get them back outside and living life to the fullest,” said Dave Frey, Veterans Charity Ride Founder. “Many of our veterans used to ride motorcycles before their injuries and thought they never would ride again. Through support from companies like Indian Motorcycle and Champion Sidecar, we are able to get these vets back on bikes and enjoy the freedom of the open road.”

This year’s ride to Sturgis will start on July 28 in Moab, Utah where the group will take the trek through some of the nation’s most scenic backgrounds roads in the western United States. The group will stop and visit local communities along the route, such as Fort Collins, Colorado, where the group will be receiving an official proclamation and welcoming by the Mayor before arriving at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in South Dakota on August 6. Participants will be riding an assortment of Indian Motorcycle models, outfitted with Rekluse® auto clutch systems and custom-built Champion Sidecars for amputee and paraplegic veterans.

The 14-day adventure allows participating veterans the opportunity to push towards conquering their post-war challenges while out on the open road. Throughout the trip, veterans will also conduct team-building exercises allowing riders to share their service experience during the emotional and mind-detoxing motorcycle ride.

“We’re honored to support our U.S. veterans and contribute to suchGroup of motorcycle riders gather around two mororcycles and spectators on the sidelines noble cause like the Veteran’s Charity Ride,” said Aaron Jax, Vice President for Indian Motorcycle. “Riding can be one of the most therapeutic experiences, as we have seen first-hand the dramatic evolution and incredible growth from vets that have completed the VCR program.”

The Veterans Charity Ride to Sturgis was created by veteran Army Paratrooper Dave Frey and leverages the therapeutic effects of motorcycle riding to create an adventure of a lifetime for wounded and amputee combat veterans adjusting to post-war life.

To support the Veterans Charity Ride, donate, or to learn more visit VeteransCharityRide.org.

Riders can also follow along on Indian Motorcycle’s social media channels: Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, and Veterans Charity Ride’s social media channels: Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

ABOUT INDIAN MOTORCYCLE®

Indian Motorcycle is America’s first motorcycle company. Founded in 1901, Indian Motorcycle has won the hearts of motorcyclists around the world and earned distinction as one of America’s most legendary and iconic brands through unrivaled racing dominance, engineering prowess and countless innovations and industry firsts. Today that heritage and passion is reignited under brand new stewardship. To learn more, please visit www.indianmotorcycle.com.

REKLUSE® is a registered trademark of REKLUSE RACING, LLC

ABOUT VETERANS CHARITY RIDE

Veterans Charity Ride (VCR), started by veterans for veterans, is a non-profit organization that delivers Motorcycle Therapy and additional life changing, life-saving holistic programs specifically designed to assist wounded and amputee combat veterans with their needs and the issues they deal with on a daily basis. Helping our fellow veterans through outreach, action, activities, education and follow-up is what drives our organization. The end result of our program is a healthier and happier, more capable individual, who is now living life in a much better physical and mental condition, and able to help and support other veterans to do the same. Visit www.veteranscharityride.org to learn more and support this worthy cause.

Macy’s presents ‘United We Celebrate’ on 4th of July

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4th of July concept with Statue of Liberty and fireworks

(Macy’s) It’ll be a blast! Watch the nation’s largest fireworks show Sunday, July 4th at 8PM EST.

The 45th annual Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks will illuminate the Big Apple skyline with an electrifying light show full of bursting colors, jubilant music & feeling of positivity.

This year, we’re honoring America’s everyday heroes from communities across the country & the resilient spirit within us all. It’s our way of looking ahead with renewed hope for a brighter tomorrow.

Get excited for all the eye-popping pyrotechnics & dazzling drama you’ll experience when our show makes its highly anticipated return.

Top vocalists, the United States Army Field Band & Soldiers Choir & an orchestra’s cinematic sounds come together in a special salute to American bravery & optimism.

How do I get tickets to see Macy’s 4th Of July Fireworks?
Macy’s Fireworks is a free public event. Tickets are not for sale. Macy’s works closely with local agencies to provide more than two miles of public viewing space that gives spectators a front-row view. These locations, entry points & security details will be available in our “Where to Watch” section coming soon.

Where can I see the performers?
Macy’s incredible lineup of performers can be enjoyed by tuning in to our one-night-only NBC broadcast special, Macy’s 4th Of July Fireworks Spectacular, on Sunday, July 4, from 8pm-10pm ET/PT, 7pm-9pm CT/MT. Check local listings.

Watch the trailer!

Read more at Macy’s.com.

Normandy Commemorates D-Day With Small Crowds, But A Big Heart

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background with 3d texts, army helmet and remember and honor D-Day text

Article originally posted on NPR

When the sun rises over Omaha Beach, revealing vast stretches of wet sand extending toward distant cliffs, one starts to grasp the immensity of the task faced by Allied soldiers on June 6, 1944, landing on the Nazi-occupied Normandy shore.

Several ceremonies were held Sunday to commemorate the 77th anniversary of the decisive assault that led to the liberation of France and western Europe from Nazi control, and honor those who fell.

“These are the men who enabled liberty to regain a foothold on the European continent, and who in the days and weeks that followed lifted the shackles of tyranny, hedgerow by Normandy hedgerow, mile by bloody mile,” Britain’s ambassador to France, Lord Edward Llewelyn, said at the inauguration of a new British monument to D-Day’s heroes.

On D-Day, more than 150,000 Allied troops landed on the beaches code-named Omaha, Utah, Juno, Sword and Gold, carried by 7,000 boats. This year on June 6, the beaches stood vast and nearly empty as the sun emerged, exactly 77 years since the dawn invasion.

For the second year in a row, anniversary commemorations were marked by virus travel restrictions that prevented veterans or families of fallen soldiers from the U.S., Britain, Canada and other Allied countries from making the trip to France. Only a few officials were allowed exceptions.

At the U.K. ceremony near the village of Ver-sur-Mer, bagpipes played memorial tunes and warplanes zipped overhead trailing red-white-and-blue smoke. Socially distanced participants stood in awe at the solemnity and serenity of the site, providing a spectacular and poignant view over Gold Beach and the English Channel.

The new monument pays tribute to those under British command who died on D-Day and during the Battle of Normandy. Visitors stood to salute the more than 22,000 men and women, mostly British soldiers, whose names are etched on its stone columns. Giant screens showed D-Day veterans gathered simultaneously at Britain’s National Memorial Aboretum to watch the Normandy event remotely. Prince Charles, speaking via video link, expressed regret that he couldn’t attend in person.

On June 6, 1944, “In the heart of the mist that enveloped the Normandy Coast … was a lightning bolt of freedom,” French Defense Minister Florence Parly told the ceremony. “France does not forget. France is forever grateful.”

Most public events have been canceled, and the official ceremonies are limited to a small number of selected guests and dignitaries.

Denis van den Brink, a WWII expert working for the town of Carentan, site of a strategic battle near Utah Beach, acknowledged the “big loss, the big absence is all the veterans who couldn’t travel.”

“That really hurts us very much because they are all around 95, 100 years old, and we hope they’re going to last forever. But, you know…” he said.

“At least we remain in a certain spirit of commemoration, which is the most important,” he told The Associated Press.

Continue on to read the full article on NPR.

Armed Forces Bank Announces New Partnership with A Million Thanks to Send Thank You Letters to Military Members Serving Around the World

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table decorated in military colors inside bank lobby with Armed Forces Bank banner on it

Armed Forces Bank (AFB), a full-service military bank committed to serving those who serve since 1907, recently announced a new partnership with A Million Thanks to send thank you letters to military members serving around the world. A Million Thanks is a national organization that collects and distributes letters of support and thanks directly to active duty, reserve and veteran military men and women. AFB was recently named the official financial services partner for A Million Thanks.

Beginning May 17 during National Military Appreciation Month, AFB branch locations will become official A Million Thanks “Send A Letter” collection sites with drop boxes available for bank clients and community members to send notes of appreciation. Drop boxes will be available in each of AFB’s 26 locations across the country and in 80 branch locations of Academy Bank, AFB’s sister bank.

“Our partnership with A Million Thanks is a natural extension of our long-standing commitment to support the bravery and dedication of our military service members and their families,” said Don Giles, President of Armed Forces Bank. “We’re honored to join forces with the inspiring mission of A Million Thanks by offering our clients and the communities we serve a convenient way to send notes of gratitude directly to those who are protecting and defending our country.”

Armed Forces Bank will also offer an opportunity to send digital messages via its website at www.afbank.com/message-your-appreciation/a-million-thanks. Since 2004, A Million Thanks has collected and distributed nearly 11 million letters to military service members.

“Now with the Armed Forces Bank partnership, we have the opportunity to significantly expand our efforts with our ‘Send A Letter’ drop boxes in their branches across the country,” said Shauna Fleming, founder and CEO of A Million Thanks. “A handwritten letter is a simple, but powerful gesture that anyone can do to express his or her appreciation for our military’s courage, sacrifice and dedication. The response to the letters is often quite emotional. The letters provide a morale boost, not just to one service member, but often to the entire unit.”

table decorated in military colors inside bank lobby with young man filing out a card to drop in boxArmed Forces Bank’s Long-Standing Military Commitment

With its headquarters in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, AFB has been dedicated to serving military service members and their families for more than 110 years. Approximately 35% of AFB Associates have some type of military affiliation either by spouse, retired themselves or their children. AFB’s dedication to the military has included many leadership initiatives and awards.

  • AFB was named “Distinguished Bank of the Year” by the Department of the Army and Navy in 2019 and has recently received nine nominations from the Army, Navy and Air Force for the 2020 award. Nominated by the Command Leadership at military installation around the country, the award recognizes AFB’s leadership in serving military service members and their families with a vast array of banking services, installation support and financial education.
  • For the past eight consecutive years, AFB also has earned the “Military Saves Designation of Savings Excellence” by the Association of Military Banks. The program helps service members and their families save money, reduce debt and build wealth.
  • AFB is a founding partner of the Military Spouse Employment Partnership. MSEP connects military spouses with hundreds of partner employers committed to recruit, hire, promote and retain military spouses for long-term, portable careers with advancement opportunities.

“At Armed Forces Bank, we celebrate the contributions and sacrifices made by military spouses. They are the backbone of military families. As a spouse of a 20-year Army retiree, that hits home,” said Jodi Vickery, EVP and Director of Military Consumer Lending. “Our partnership with A Million Thanks gives us another important way to actively express our gratitude for the many sacrifices military men and women endure.”

In support of Military Appreciation Month in May, AFB associates around the country are embarking on Random Acts of Kindness to show appreciation to servicemembers, such as spontaneous help to pay for a fill-up at the gas pump or handing out gift cards to make groceries a little less expensive for service members and their families.

“Every day, it is an honor to serve our active and retired military service members and their families in every way we can,” Giles added. “No matter where they are stationed or deployed around the world, AFB is dedicated to expressing our appreciation by making everything from banking solutions to financial advice valuable, convenient and personal.”

About Armed Forces Bank

Armed Forces Bank (AFB), founded and headquartered in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, is a full-service military bank committed to serving those who serve since 1907. As part of a family of banks with over $1.2 billion in assets, AFB provides affordable, personal and convenient banking and financial services to both active and retired military and civilian clients in all 50 states and around the world. Armed Forces Bank has more on-base locations than any military bank in the country with 26 locations. Armed Forces Bank is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Dickinson Financial Corporation, a $3.5 billion bank holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo. AFB’s sister bank, Academy Bank, is a full-service community bank with over 80 branch locations in Arizona, Colorado, Kansas and Missouri. For more, visit www.afbank.com.

About A Million Thanks

Founded in 2004, A Million Thanks is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization dedicated to supporting the U.S. Military. A Million Thanks provides support and appreciation to our active and veteran military men and women through sending letters and granting betterment of life wishes, as well as providing higher education scholarships to their children. For more, visit www.amillionthanks.org.

Memorial Day Freebies for Veterans & Military Members

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Memorial Day freebies and discounts offer

By Natalie Rodgers

As part of Military Appreciation Month and Memorial Day, several businesses and organizations across the country are offering free and discounted services to current and veteran military personnel this month.

Check out our list below to see the ways in which others are supporting and appreciating our troops. Unless otherwise specified, these deals apply to all branches of the military for active-duty, retired, and veteran members.

Shopping:

  • Blanquil: 40% off all items
  • Eyemart Express: 20% off with verified military ID
  • Home Depot: 10% off on Memorial Day with verified military ID
  • Jiffy Lube: 15% off for all services year-around
  • Kohl’s: 15% off every Monday in May for all military personnel and their families with verified military ID
  • Levi’s: 15% off with verified military ID
  • Moosejaw: 20% off full priced items with verified military ID
  • MONI Smart Security: 10% off their first 12 months of service during the month of May
  • The North Face: 10% off your order for all military personnel, their spouses, and their dependents.
  • Oakley: 50% off select products
  • Pep Boys: 10% off services and parts
  • Reebok: 30% off
  • Samsung: Various discounts across appliances with Samsung’s military discount program
  • Sherwin-Williams: 15% off for all military personnel and their spouses with a verified military ID
  • T-Mobile: 50% off Magenta rate family lines for military personnel and their families
  • Under Armour: 15% off your purchase on Memorial Day, special Veterans dedicated items are also available for purchase.
  • Zappos: 10% off entire orders for military personnel

Food and Drink:

  • Chick-fil-A: 10% off for all service members with a verified military ID
  • Cold Stone Creamery: 10% off for all service members
  • Denny’s: Varying discounts between 10% and 20% off at varying locations
  • El Pollo Loco: 15% off with verified military ID
  • Friendly’s: Various discounts with verified military ID
  • Fuddruckers: 15% off with verified military ID
  • Home Chef: 50% off for all service members, teachers, first responders, and medical personnel.
  • Hooters: 20% off all takeout orders for military personnel, healthcare workers, and first responders
  • Jersey Mike’s: 10% off your order
  • IHOP: 20% off your meal at select locations
  • Ninety Nine Restaurant: All military personnel will receive a free entrée with the purchase of another meal
  • Outback Steakhouse: 10% off for military personnel and their families with verified military ID
  • Pizza Hut: 10% off your order in-store with verified military ID
  • Sweet Frog: 15% off every Monday in May
  • Vineyard Vines: 15% off most products with verified military ID

Experiences:

2021 Memorial Day Schedule of Major Events

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Memorial Day and Honor words on a flowing American flag

Originally posted on MilitaryBenefits.com

Memorial Day began sometime after the Civil War with both formal and informal ceremonies at graves and ceremonies for the soldiers who had fallen in battle. Many places claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day in 1866, including Waterloo, New York and both Macon and Columbus, Georgia. On May 5, 1868, the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR), a Union veterans organization, established Decoration Day, May 30, as a time for the nation to decorate the dead with flowers. Arlington National Cemetery held the first large observance later that year.

By the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held throughout the country on May 30. Over time, the Army and Navy adopted policies for proper observances, and state legislatures passed proclamations designating the day. After World War I the day was expanded to honor those who died in all American wars, and in 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday to be celebrated on the last Monday in May.

2021 Memorial Day Schedule of Major Events

Virtual Memorial Day Events

  • Veterans Legacy Memorial (VLM)
  • Create a Free Remembrance Plaque
    • Together We Served is inviting any Veteran or Family Member to create a Remembrance Military Service Plaque, at no charge, to remember an Active Serving or Veteran Soldier, Sailor, Marine, Airman or Coastguardsman who is now Deceased.
  • National D-Day Memorial – 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. est on Mon. May 31st
    • The Memorial will honor and remember those who gave their lives to the cause of freedom with a virtual online event. On-site visitors get free admission 10AM – Noon and can view the ceremony from a screen in the Bobbie G. Johnson pavilion.
  • New Jersey Vietnam Veterans Memorial Remembrance Day Ceremony – Online at 11:00 a.m. EST on Monday, May 31st
  • Vietnam Veterans Memorial – Online at 1:00 p.m. EST on Monday, May 31st
    • The 2021 Memorial Day Ceremony will be a live webcast. A small in-person ceremony will take place limited to 250 guests. Spots must be reserved in advance.
  • Virtual National Relay
    • Carry The Load’s Memorial May Campaign, in partnership with the VA, brings awareness to the service and sacrifice of our military, veterans, first responders and their families. Start or join a team or participate as an individual.
  • Wear Blue to Remember/Team Red White and Blue (RWB)
  • Parade of Heroes – 8 a.m. PT May 31

Check with your local veterans organizations, monuments, military bases and local governments for events. There are many virtual runs, ceremonies and observances being held locally throughout the U.S.

Memorial Day Events

Call ahead or check online for any in person events due to current circumstances.

  • VA National Cemeteries
    • Each VA national cemetery will conduct a brief wreath laying ceremony, accompanied by a moment of silence and the playing of Taps. Ceremonies will not be open to the public but will be Live Streamed and posted here as they appear on May 25.
    • Other public events typically associated with Memorial Day at national cemeteries, including group placement of flags at gravesites, will not take place. However, all VA national cemeteries will be open Memorial Day weekend from dawn to dusk for public visitation.
    • Visitors are also urged to consider visiting Friday, Saturday or Sunday to avoid possible crowds on Memorial Day. Families may continue the tradition of placing flowers and small American flags at their Veteran’s gravesite.
    • While the department can’t hold large public ceremonies, VA will still honor Veterans and service members with the solemn dignity and respect they have earned through their service and sacrifice. VA Secretary Robert Wilkie
    • See the National Cemetery Administration (NCA) announcement for more details.
  • Arlington National Cemetery, Washington D.C.
    • Flags In – Thursday, May 27, 12:00 p.m.
    • National Memorial Day Observance at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier – Monday, May 31, 11:00 a.m.
  • Air Force Memorial – TBD, Washington D.C.
  • Dallas Memorial March, Dallas, TX
    • Sunday, May 30th at 12PM – Monday, May 31st at 1:30PM
    • Decorate your cars and show the families of those who have fallen that they will not be forgotten.
  • Fleet Week – Memorial Events New York City, NY.
    • Fleet Week 2021 will be virtual and runs May 26-31, 2021
    • Parade of Ships – Cancelled
    • 10th Annual Veterans Appreciation Day & Memorial Tribute Event – Cancelled
    • Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Memorial Day Observance – Cancelled
    • Intrepid Memorial Day Commemoration – Cancelled
  • 153rd Gettysburg Memorial Day Parade & Ceremonies – Memorial Day, May 31, 12:00 p.m. ET, Gettysburg, PA. Cancelled.
  • National Memorial Day Concert – Sunday, May 30, 8 p.m. ET, West Lawn of U.S. Capitol.
    • Broadcast on PBS
  • National Memorial Day Parade – Memorial Day, 2 p.m., Washington D.C. Cancelled.
    • It will be replaced by a televised event, The National Memorial Day Parade: America Stands Tall.
  • National Veterans Memorial & Museum – May 28 – May 31, 2021, Columbus, OH
    • Special Memorial Day Events begin on Friday May 28th and run throughout the weekend.
    • Memorial Day Remembrance Ceremony Monday, May 31 10AM – 11AM
  • Navy MemorialCancelled, Washington D.C.
    • Rolling Thunder Ceremony
    • First Reserve Assn. Ceremony
    • NDW Wreath Laying Ceremony
  • President Lincoln’s CottageCancelled – Monday, 10 am., Washington D.C.
  • World War II MemorialCancelled – Monday, 9 a.m., Washington D.C

Find a Memorial Day ceremony near you, 120+ VA National Cemetery events across the country. 2021 events will be added as announced.


Memorial Day Activities & Events to Honor Those Who Died

  • Visit cemeteries and memorials.
  • Attend Memorial Day ceremonies.
  • Volunteer to place an American Flag on each grave in national cemeteries.
  • Observe a minute of silence at 3:00 PM, local time.
  • Attend a Memorial Day parade, festival, fair or concert such as the National Memorial Day Concert.
  • Run for charity on Memorial Day weekend.
  • Volunteer to support events such as the National Memorial Day Parade.
  • Donate to veterans and military support groups.
  • Wear Blue.

National Moment of Remembrance

The National Moment of Remembrance is an annual event that asks Americans to pause for a moment of silence for a minute at 3:00 pm on Memorial Day. The 3 pm time was chosen, because it is the time when many Americans are enjoying their freedoms on the national holiday. It is intended to be a unifying act of remembrance for Americans of all ages. The National Moment of Remembrance Act became law in the year 2000.

There are many ways to observe the National Moment of Remembrance, both formally and informally. The moment of silence can be observed more formally at places such as a veterans cemetery, park, picnic ground and can include playing ‘Taps’, the military bugle call that reflects on the glory of those who have shed blood for us. A bell can also be rung at the beginning and end of the one minute of remembrance. If you are driving and unable to stop you can turn on your headlights for a minute.

Read more: https://militarybenefits.info/memorial-day/#ixzz6voCJbKFY

Remembering the Fallen on Memorial Day

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Remember and honor words with flag in background for Memorial Day observance

By Kat Castagnoli, Managing Editor, U.S. Veterans Magazine

In our day-to-day lives, it’s all too easy to take the freedoms and luxuries we enjoy for granted. But, as any serviceman or woman, veteran, military spouse or family will tell you, freedom doesn’t exist without sacrifice.

That is why, on the last Monday in May, we here at U.S. Veterans Magazine urge you to take a moment and remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice in service to our country. On Memorial Day, we pay tribute to the fallen soldiers who gave their all so we could enjoy all we have – and whose efforts we will never forget.

Ensuring that the stories of these brave servicemembers are being told in Hollywood is something 30-year acting and Air Force veteran Jon Huertas is passionate about. This month’s cover, who is perhaps best known as Miguel Rivas on the widely acclaimed NBC show, This Is Us, created his own production company called WestSide Stories in order to, “shine a light on the other people who volunteer their lives in service of this country,” Huertas says. “For me personally, having an active-duty member of the uniformed services or a veteran with a positive portrayal of that type of character is paramount to each and every one of our stories.” Read more about this talented LatinX actor, producer and veteran on page 68.

Kat Castagnoli headshot

Helping veterans with their transition into civilian life is one way we like to honor and support them. For example, showing them ways to hone their unique skills after service like on page 10. Or tips on what they should know well ahead of their transition on page 20.

If you’re a veteran and are looking to start your own business, learning how to find the right entrepreneurial fit page 36 and start smart page 34 can make all the difference to your success.

We owe a debt of gratitude to those who risked everything to defend our country and keep us safe. So, not just on Memorial Day, but every day, we are thankful for their service and their sacrifice.

Kat Castagnoli
Managing Editor, U.S. Veterans Magazine

Armed Forces Day – Military Appreciation Month

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Armed Forces Day

In the United States, Armed Forces Day is celebrated on the third Saturday in May. It falls near the end of Armed Forces Week, which begins on the second Saturday of May and ends on the third Sunday of May (the fourth if the month begins on a Sunday, as in 2016).[16]

First observed on 20 May 1950, the day was created on 31 August 1949, to honor Americans serving in the five U.S. military branches – the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Air Force and U.S. Coast Guard – following the consolidation of the military services in the U.S. Department of Defense. It was intended to replace the separate Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard Days, but the separate days are still observed, especially within the respective services.[17]

The first Armed Forces Day was celebrated by parades, open houses, receptions and air shows. The United States’ longest continuously running Armed Forces Day Parade is held in Bremerton, Washington. In 2019 Bremerton will celebrate the 71st year of the Armed Forces Day Parade.

Because of their unique training schedules, National Guard and Reserve units may celebrate Armed Forces Day/Week over any period in the month of May.

On 19 May 2017, President Donald Trump reaffirmed the Armed Forces Day holiday, marking the 70th anniversary since the creation of the Department of Defense.[18][19][20]

Aside from the Armed Forces Day the Armed Forces and the National Guard Bureau are honored on the following days:

  • 29 March: Vietnam Veterans Day (All US Military Branches)[21]
  • Last Monday of May: Memorial Day
  • 14 June: Flag Day and Army Day (United States Army)
  • 4 August: Coast Guard Day (United States Coast Guard)
  • 18 September: Air Force Day (United States Air Force)
  • 13 October: US Navy Birthday (United States Navy)
  • 27 October: Navy Day (United States Navy)
  • 10 November: Marine Corps Birthday (United States Marine Corps)
  • 11 November: Veterans Day
  • 13 December: National Guard Day (National Guard of the United States)

Source: Wikipedia

Parachuting with a Purpose: Local US Marine Corps Veteran BASE Jumps to Raise Awareness of Veteran Suicide

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us marine lands his parachute in grassy area near mountain

The number of service men who were killed in action in 2019 is the same number of veterans who die by suicide each and every day.

Pittsburgh Veteran Tristan Wimmer returned to the skies of his hometown to bring attention to this national crisis.

On Jan. 30, 2021, Wimmer teamed up with other Veterans to complete 22 BASE jumps — 22 is symbolic of the 22 United States Active Duty and Veterans who succumb to suicide each day.

The jumps were held as part of the 2nd Annual 22Jumps event at Camelback Mountain in Phoenix, AZ, beginning 6 am (MST) and continued throughout the day.

Wimmer’s brother took his own life in 2015 after sustaining a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Iraq while serving in the United States Marine Corps. The event, 22Jumps, started last year as a tribute to his brother, but quickly drew local and national media attention, as well as support from the brain injury, mental health, and Veterans’ communities, and countless families affected by Veteran suicide. In the past year, Wimmer’s effort, 22Jumps.org, has grown into a nationwide initiative, with Veterans pledging to plan and participate in future events throughout the U.S. and all funds raised supporting Cohen Veteran Bioscience (CVB), a nonprofit biomedical research organization that is dedicated to fast-tracking precision diagnostics and tailored therapeutics for brain trauma, a major risk factor for suicide.

This year, Wimmer hopes to raise a symbolic $22,000 through his 22Jumps Facebook fundraiser. Donations can also be made at: www.cohenveteransbioscience.org/22-jumps/

22Jumps.org founder and veteran Tristan Wimmer stated-

“TBIs disproportionately effect servicemen and women. I personally know dozens of Veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and emotional management issues – many of whom have succumb to suicide. The effects of those deployments linger long after returning home. I’m honored to fundraise for CVB, an organization that recognizes the need to develop new treatment options for the millions of Veterans and civilians who suffer from TBIs and other mental health issues to finally combat the epidemic of Veterans suicide. To move forward, Veterans need more advocates like CVB, and we need more science that embraces the complexity of this Veteran-heavy disease.”

Fast facts about TBIs and Veteran suicide:

  • 19% of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans reported a probable TBI during deployment.
  • Veteran suicides make up a disproportionate—14 percent—of total suicides in America.
  • TBI and PTSD have taken an enormous toll on Veteran populations. With more than 2.7 million men and women deployed to support combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2001, the likelihood and burden of these brain diseases will only increase.

If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, contact the Veterans Crisis Line at 1-800-273-8255 to receive free, confidential support and crisis interventional available 24/7/365.

Donations: https://www.cohenveteransbioscience.org/22-jumps/

About 22Jumps
www.22Jumps.org

The rate of suicide among veterans is at an all-time high — 22 per day, according to 2012 US Dept. of Veteran Affairs study. Yet, despite this soaring statistic, scant public funding is allocated to the problem. 22Jumps was founded in 2019 by Tristan Wimmer, Infantryman and Scout Sniper in 2nd Battalion 1st Marines, in response to his brother Kiernan Wimmer’s own suicide. Kiernan was a recon and MARSOC marine who served one tour in Afghanistan and one tour in Iraq. In 2006, Kiernan sustained a massive TBI that diminished his quality of life and contributed to his decision to commit suicide.

About Cohen Veteran Bioscience
www.cohenveteransbioscience.org/

Cohen Veterans Bioscience (CVB) is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) research organization dedicated to fast-tracking the development of diagnostic tests and personalized therapeutics for the millions of Veterans and civilians who suffer the devastating effects of trauma-related and other brain disorders. CVB is harnessing the power of biotechnology (including neuroimaging, ‘omics, and biosensors) in combination with high-performance computing and data analytics to understand the underlying mechanisms of brain trauma and discover new ways to improve treatment for all patients.

Rolling Stone And Philip Morris International Celebrate Veterans With Rolling Stone Salute To Service

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Rolling Stone promo for Salute to Service event

Kicking off this Veterans Day, November 11, Rolling Stone is proud to pay tribute to our veterans and troops with Rolling Stone Salute To Service, presented by Philip Morris International.

This three-part panel and performance series celebrating Veterans will include deep discussions on the progress that has been made to more inclusively support them, and performances by top artists in support of Veterans and their service.

Each of the three conversations, brought to viewers through a virtual screening experience, will be moderated by Rolling Stone’s Jamil Smith, Jerry Portwood and Joseph Hudak and include exclusive appearances from today’s top talent and representatives from top Veterans associations.

Participating talent includes Trace Adkins, Lea DeLaria, Justin Moore, S.G. Goodman, and Michael Ray. Participating Veterans organization representatives includes Julz Carey (AVER) Joe Chenelly (AMVETS), Donna Brock (U.S. Army Women’s Foundation), Ken Falke (Boulder Crest), Justin Brown (The Nimitz Group), Margaret Harrell, PhD (Bob Woodruff Foundation) and more…

To register for the events and for more information, visit rollingstonesalutetoservice.com.

Conversations will include:
• Salute to Minority Veterans (November 11, 12pm PT/3pm ET)
o Moderated by Rolling Stone editor Jamil Smith, this conversation will focus on the increasing number of women, minorities and LGBTQ Veterans and their experience and the mirrored experiences of minority talent and their personal journeys.
o Talent includes: Jamil Smith, Lea DeLaria, Julz Carey (AVER), Donna Brock (U.S. Army Women’s Foundation)
• Veteran Mental Health Awareness (November 19, 12pm PT/3pm ET)
o Led by Rolling Stone editor Jerry Portwood, this roundtable will discuss the need for increased awareness and response to veteran mental health as well as the role this conversation takes in the national dialogue on mental health.
o Talent includes: Jerry Portwood, Justin Moore, Michael Ray, Ken Falke (Boulder Crest), Justin Brown (The Nimitz Group)
• Veteran Advocacy and Support (December 1, 12pm PT/3pm ET)
o Facilitated by Rolling Stone editor Joseph Hudak, tune in to hear a lively discussion regarding modern day Veteran support, the current Veteran experience in America as well as personal stories from guests on their involvement in the cause. Sign up here (link) to attend these meaningful discussions around today’s service-member experience.
o Talent includes: Joseph Hudak, Trace Adkins, Joe Chenelly (AMVETS), and Margaret C. Harrell, PhD (Bob Woodruff Foundation)

5 Important Facts About Veterans Day

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group of military supporters gathered holding signs that say thank you

Veterans Day is a well-known American holiday, but there are also a few misconceptions about it — like how it’s spelled or whom exactly it celebrates.

To clear some of that up, here are the important facts you should know.

Veterans Day does NOT have an apostrophe.

A lot of people think it’s “Veteran’s Day” or “Veterans’ Day,” but they’re wrong. The holiday is not a day that “belongs” to one veteran or multiple veterans, which is what an apostrophe implies. It’s a day for honoring all veterans—so no apostrophe needed.

Veterans Day is NOT the Same as Memorial Day.

A lot of Americans get this confused, and we’ll be honest—it can be a little annoying to all of the living veterans out there.

Memorial Day is a time to remember those who gave their lives for our country, particularly in battle or from wounds they suffered in battle. Veterans Day honors all of those who have served the country in war or peace—dead or alive—although it’s largely intended to thank living veterans for their sacrifices.

It was originally called Armistice Day, commemorating the end of World War I.

World War I officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919. However, the fighting ended about seven months before that when the Allies and Germany put into effect an armistice on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month.

For that reason, Nov. 11, 1918, was largely considered the end of “the war to end all wars” and dubbed Armistice Day. In 1926, Congress officially recognized it as the end of the war, and in 1938, it became an official holiday, primarily a day set aside to honor veterans of World War I.

But then World War II and the Korean War happened, so on June 1, 1954, at the urging of veterans service organizations, Congress amended the commemoration yet again by changing the word “armistice” to “veterans” so the day would honor American veterans of all wars.

For a while, Veterans Day’s date was changed, too, and it confused everybody.

Congress signed the Uniform Holiday Bill in 1968 to ensure that a few federal holidays—Veterans Day included—would be celebrated on a Monday. Officials hoped

President Dwight D. Eisenhower signing the bill with several male onlookers
President Dwight D. Eisenhower signs HR7786, June 1, 1954. This ceremony changed Armistice Day to Veterans Day

it would spur travel and other family activities over a long weekend, which would stimulate the economy.

For some inexplicable reason, the bill set Veterans Day commemorations for the fourth Monday of every October.

On Oct. 25, 1971, the first Veterans Day under this new bill was held. We’re not sure why it took three years to implement, but not surprisingly, there was a lot of confusion about the change, and many states were unhappy, choosing to continue to recognize the day as they previously had—in November.

Within a few years, it became pretty apparent that most U.S. citizens wanted to celebrate Veterans Day on Nov. 11, since it was a matter of historic and patriotic significance. So, on Sept. 20, 1975, President Gerald Ford signed another law (Public Law 94-97), which returned the annual observance to its original date starting in 1978.

Other countries celebrate it, too, in their own ways.

World War I was a multinational effort, so it makes sense that our allies also wanted to celebrate their veterans on Nov. 11. The name of the day and the types of commemorations differ, however.

Canada and Australia both call Nov. 11 “Remembrance Day.” Canada’s observance is pretty similar to our own, except many of its citizens wear red poppy flowers to honor their war dead. In Australia, the day is more akin to our Memorial Day.

Great Britain calls it “Remembrance Day,” too, but observes it on the Sunday closest to Nov. 11 with parades, services and two minutes of silence in London to honor those who lost their lives in war.

Source: defense.gov

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Upcoming Events

  1. Women in Federal Law Enforcement (WIFLE)
    August 16, 2021 - August 19, 2021
  2. New Directions for Veterans “Veterans Valor” Golf Classic
    August 16, 2021
  3. WIFLE Annual Leadership Training
    August 16, 2021 - August 19, 2021
  4. Annual VetsWhatsNext Golf Tournament
    September 3, 2021
  5. Commercial UAV Expo Americas, Las Vegas
    September 7, 2021 - September 9, 2021