A bridge from the Navy to civilian life

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two student veterans are pictured in the center of a Raytheon warehouse background

Raytheon Missiles & Defense awards SPY-6 scholarships to US Navy vets.

Raytheon Missiles & Defense, a Raytheon Technologies business, has partnered with the Student Veterans of America to award two $10,000 scholarships to U.S. Navy student veterans.

The recipients are Francheska Salazar, a sophomore at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and Chris Ricks, who attends Harvard Business School in Boston, Massachusetts.

The scholarship, named for the Navy’s SPY-6 family of radars, helps veterans achieve their educational goals and succeed in their transition to civilian life. It is part of the company’s longstanding support for military veterans, which includes a $5 million commitment to SVA.

Photo: Francheska Salazar and Chris Ricks received the 2020 Raytheon Missiles & Defense SPY-6 scholarships offered exclusively to U.S. Navy student veterans pursuing an undergraduate or graduate degree.

A humanitarian at heart

Pride in service runs deep in Francheska Salazar’s family, as she is a fifth generation veteran, but her decision to enlist in the Navy extends beyond tradition.

“I realized how much each generation of my family sacrificed so I may have the privilege to have choices,” Salazar said. “I was not about to waste this opportunity.”

While serving 13 years in the military, Salazar deployed to Latin America on humanitarian missions that helped shape her career trajectory and life purpose.

“I want to be part of a team that works to find long-term solutions,” said Salazar, who aspires to work in immigration and human rights policy.

After separating from the Navy, Salazar used her GI Bill at a community college where she earned paralegal degrees. It left her with limited benefits to complete her bachelor’s degree and attend law school.

“The SPY-6 scholarship gives me peace of mind and hope,” she said.

A life of service

Chris Ricks wanted to be a part of something bigger than himself, so he joined the Navy’s Submarine Force.

“Every day on a nuclear submarine was something special,” said Ricks, an 8-year veteran. “Every sailor has a unique role in accomplishing the mission.”

The former sailor will use the SPY-6 scholarship to help pay for his MBA.

“I look at it as a long-term investment that will serve as a foundation for the next chapter of my life,” he said.

Ricks hopes to someday use artificial intelligence to improve the lives of others in agriculture, health, finance and education.

“My military experience has given me a passion to empower others, improve systems and solve problems with cutting-edge technology,” he said.

Source: Raytheon

99-year-old World War II veteran finally gets his medals

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Veteran Sgt. 1st Class Marvin Cornett sits tall in wheelchair on sidewalk in his military uniform

Shaky but sturdy, retired Sgt. 1st Class Marvin Cornett stood tall in a uniform he hadn’t worn in more than half a century to receive an overlooked award he’d been due since 1944.

Donning his “Eisenhower jacket,” a green, waist-length jacket worn by the famous general in the later stages of World War II, a garrison cap and matching trousers, Cornett was the center of attention at American Legion Post 84, in Auburn, California, Monday for an outdoor ceremony in which he finally received his Purple Heart and Bronze Star Medal.

Photo: WWII veteran Jimmie H. Royer attends the ceremony where he was awarded France’s Legion of Honor at VFW Post 346 in Terre Haute, Ind., Sunday, Sept. 29, 2019. Image Credit: Austen Leake/The Tribune-Star via AP

Cornett, 99, came in not an inch shorter or a pound heavier than in his fighting shape of three-quarters of a century past, when he stood 5-foot-2-inches tall and carried 110 pounds on his frame.

More than 77 years ago, after having helped capture Sicily, completing a nighttime combat jump in the rain and seeing heavy combat during the Allied invasion of Italy, Cornett was wounded during a combat assault at Amzio on Jan. 31, 1944, which pulled him from the front lines.

His wounds, severe enough to send him home, were listed in unit paperwork. But in the blur of wartime bureaucracy, they were lost.

Members of the 82nd Airborne, along with other active duty and retired military members, were on hand to see Cornett get the awards he was due at the outdoor ceremony in California. Maj. Gen. Christopher Donahue, commander of the 82nd Airborne Division, spoke with Cornett on a remote video call during the ceremony.

Recounting Cornett’s wartime and post-war service — along with the anecdote that until a few years ago, the man still regularly did 100 pushups a day — Donahue made an offer.

“If you want to come back, come on back,” Donahue said. “We need men like you.”

Cornett served in Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 82nd Airborne.

“You represent everything that is great with this country. You represent everything that is great with paratroopers,” Donahue said. “You are the 82nd Airborne Division.”

Read the full article at Army Times.

Recruit Your Job Candidates Online

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Online recruiting is a vital strategy to make the most of your recruiting budget, and to access the best range of hiring candidates.  But it’s important to choose strategies that suit your organization, employment needs, and local workforce.

Here are some tips to recruit online effectively:

1) You can make a strong start by better understanding the labor pool of the potential workforce in your area. Study up on local demographics and reach out for personal assistance to your local American Job Center to connect with a Business Services Representative for help using online recruiting strategies.

2) You can reach a large share of qualified candidates in your area through free public job banks. Learn how to easily access your state’s job bank and how to post a job.

3) Education and training providers often seek out employers in their area for internships and employment for their students and graduates. Connect with your local schools and training programs, including local community colleges, universities, and short-term training programs to learn how to post jobs on their online tools, or connect with grads through social media.

4) Professional associations are a great source for finding qualified candidates. Learn how to connect to professional and industry associations to promote your job openings on their job boards.

5) Social media is a critical method for reaching candidates and communicating with them online. Social media platforms provide you with access to a very large pool of potential hiring candidates, whom you would likely never reach through more traditional means, and most are free to use. Learn how to get started using social media for recruitment.

There are specialized niche forums and groups for particular industries and occupations, such as GitHub for software developers, Warrior Forum for marketers, or Quora, a customizable site for shared posts on a wide variety of topics and projects. But for a broad recruiting source for all kinds of businesses, the top three social media sites are LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter.

Here’s a quick introduction to these major social media sites and tips on how to use them to find candidates:

LinkedIn

  • Create a LinkedIn profile for your company and promote your company culture to potential candidates
  • Search for candidates with the skills you’re looking for; use filters to narrow the list of candidates and view candidates’ education and work histories without requesting a resume
  • Post a job using the Jobs feature
  • Send a job opening using a “status” message
  • Post questions on recruiting issues

Facebook

  • Create a Facebook page for your company
  • Announce company news or job openings
  • Use a Facebook app (or Facebook’s new job function) to post jobs
  • Search for job candidates

Twitter

  • Create a Twitter handle and profile for your company
  • Search for (or follow) candidates with skills you’re looking for
  • Tweet information (company announcements, job openings, etc.)
  • Communicate with jobseekers who receive your tweets

Source:  CareerOneStop

What Should I Include in My Federal Resume?

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Whether you’re a current federal employee or new to the Federal Government, your resume is the primary way for you to communicate your education, skills and experience.

Before you get started

Read the entire job announcement. Focus on the following sections to understand whether or not you qualify for the position.

This critical information is found under:

  • Duties and Qualifications
  • How to Apply (including a preview of the assessment questionnaire)
  • How You Will be Evaluated

Make sure you have the required experience and/or education before you apply. Hiring agencies use the job announcement to describe the job and the required qualifications, including:

  • Level and amount of experience
  • Education
  • Training

What to include in your resume

Federal jobs often require that you have experience in a particular type of work for a certain period of time. You must show how your skills and experiences meet the qualifications and requirements listed in the job announcement to be considered for the job.

Include dates, hours, level of experience and examples for each work experience

For each work experience you list, make sure you include:

  • Start and end dates (including the month and year).
  • The number of hours you worked per week.
  • The level and amount of experience–for instance, whether you served as a project manager or a team member helps to illustrate your level of experience.
  • Examples of relevant experiences and accomplishments that prove you can perform the tasks at the level required for the job as stated in the job announcement. Your experience needs to address every required qualification.

Example:

Program Analyst GS-343-11
January 2009 – Present
40 Hours/Week
$63,000/Year

Experience/Accomplishment

Include volunteer work and roles in community organizations

Don’t limit yourself to only including paid work experience. Include relevant volunteer work or community organizations roles that demonstrate your ability to do the job.

  • Use numbers to highlight your accomplishments
  • Use numbers, percentages or dollars to highlight your accomplishments–you can find this information in things like your performance reviews, previous job descriptions, awards and letters of recommendation.

When explaining your accomplishments:

  • Include examples of how you saved money, earned money, or managed money.
  • Include examples of how you saved or managed time.

Examples:

“Improved efficiency of document processing by 25% over the previous year.”

“Wrote 25 news releases in a three-week period under daily deadlines.”

“Managed a student organization budget of more than $7,000.”

“Wrote prospect letter that has brought in more than $25,000 in donations to date.”

These statements show in concrete terms what you accomplished.

Customize your resume

You should tailor your resume to the job announcement rather than sending out the same resume for every job. Customizing your resume helps you match your competencies, knowledge, skills, abilities and experience to the requirements for each job. Emphasize your strengths and include everything you’ve done that relates to the job you’re seeking. Leave out experience that isn’t relevant.

Use similar terms and address every required qualification

Your experience needs to address every required qualification in the job announcement. Hiring agencies will look for specific terms in your resume to make sure you have the experience they’re seeking.

For example, if the qualifications section says you need experience with “MS Project” you need to use the words, “MS Project” in your resume.

Organize your resume to make it easy to understand

You need to organize your resume to help agencies evaluate your experience. If you don’t provide the information required for the hiring agency to determine your qualifications, you might not be considered for the job.

  • Use reverse chronological order to list your experience–start with your most recent experience first and work your way back.
  • Provide greater detail for experience that is relevant to the job for which you are applying.

Show all experiences and accomplishments under the job in which you earned it. This helps agencies determine the amount of experience you have with that particular skill.

  • Use either bullet or paragraph format to describe your experiences and accomplishments.
  • Use plain language– avoid using acronyms and terms that are not easily understood.

 

Be concise

Hiring agencies often receive dozens or even hundreds of resumes for certain positions. Hiring managers quickly skim through submissions and eliminate candidates who clearly are not qualified. Look at your resume and ask:

  • Can a hiring manager see my main credentials within 10 to 15 seconds?
  • Does critical information jump off the page?
  • Do I effectively sell myself on the top quarter of the first page?
  • Review your resume before you apply
  • Check your resume for spelling and grammatical errors and have someone else, with a good eye for detail, review your resume.

Important facts about the federal hiring process

The Federal Government does have a standard job application. Your resume is your application.

Hiring agencies use the job announcement to describe the job and list the required qualifications and responsibilities.

After applying, the hiring agency uses the information in your resume to verify if you have the required qualifications stated in the job announcement.

Once the hiring agency has determined who is qualified, they may use other assessments such as interviews or testing to determine the best qualified applications.

Source: usajobs.gov

General Lloyd Austin Chosen as Biden’s Secretary of Defense

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Headshot of Army General Lloyd Austin III, commander of the US Central Command

By Natalie Rodgers

Retired General Lloyd Austin has been chosen as the United States’ Secretary of Defense under President Joe Biden, making him the first black person to hold the position.

Before earning his four-star general rank and officially retiring in 2016, General Austin led the command on various historical events. He served in the U.S. Army for almost 41 years, spending much of his time as a General and commanding officer. After working for the Pentagon as the Chief Joint Operations Division for two years, Austin oversaw issues in Iraq; overseeing Operation Iraqi Freedom and the combat aspects of Operation New Dawn.

Photo Credit: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images

In 2010, Austin became the Commanding General of the United States Forces in Iraq and played an integral part in handling negotiations between the United States and Iraq governments.

In 2011, Austin was nominated to be the Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Army (VCSA), where handled the organization’s budget and improved upon issues concerning suicide, mental health, and disability. From there, he took on the commanding position of the United States Central Command (CENTCOM) under President Barack Obama’s nomination, making him the first black man to ever serve in the role.

Upon his retirement in 2016, Austin worked on the boards of large name companies such as Raytheon Technologies, Nucor, and Tenet Healthcare. He also runs his own operating firm.

Outside of his professional and official positions, Austin has been known to care for Gold Star Families, the loved ones of military personnel who passed away in service. It is highly believed that Austin’s extensive experience in the field and his understanding of the cost of life are two of the main reasons why he was nominated for the position by President Biden. Austin, much like previous Secretary of Defense, Jim Mattis, will need be waived from a law calling for a seven-year gap between service and the position.

Source: Washington Post and Wikipedia

10 Ways to Land That Civilian Job

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man in a suit smiling looking confident

You’ve proven your commitment, discipline and resourcefulness in the military world. Now it’s time to trade in your experience for a great job. Just like everything, it’s all about readiness and attitude.

Start early. Be prepared. Go for it.

  1. Verify yourself. Your Verification of Military Experience and Training, or VMET, summarizes your skills, knowledge and experience, and suggests civilian equivalent job titles. To obtain a copy of your VMET, visit the milConnect website.
  1. Get a career assessment. You have considerable strengths and skills. Now, how can they be applied to a civilian job? A career assessment can point the way. Contact your local transition assistance office and ask your counselor how you can be set up with a career assessment free of charge.
  1. Translate your experience. Your military licenses or certifications might not be recognizable to the civilian world. Learn how to translate your training and experience into skills employers recognize with Credentialing Opportunities Online, or COOL. Visit the Defense Visual Information Distribution Service website to learn more and locate your service branch’s COOL website.
  1. Get out there. Take advantage of every resource and opportunity: recruiters, military transition offices, veteran service organizations, online information. Utilize and grow your network. Contact your nearest employment office or private employment agencies (make sure you know who’s paying). Check internet job sites, such as LinkedIn, Indeed and Glassdoor – but watch it. Get recommendations for trustworthy sites.
  1. Tap your transition assistance office. Take an employment workshop. Get referrals for employment agencies and recruiters, job leads, career counseling and computer access for online job searches. Transition assistance offices have a wealth of services. You can also visit the Department of Labor’s Transition Assistance Program website for more resources.
  1. Look good online. Employers check social media almost immediately when they’re thinking of hiring. Do you need to remove material that makes you look like a bad hire? Get a professional email address or headshot? How about creating or updating your profile on LinkedIn?
  1. Hit the job fairs. This is one-stop shopping. Meet potential employers, pass out resumes and interview on the spot, all in one place. Look sharp and practice your interview skills beforehand. Learn about upcoming job fairs and who will be there at your transition office as well as online. Check out CareerOneStop’s tips for creating or updating your resume.
  1. Go from military to Fed. Find civilian jobs online with the federal government through the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. You can also create an account and build your resume at USAJobs.gov. Brush up on federal hiring with FedsHireVets.gov.
  1. Network, then network some more. Networking is one of the most effective of all job search tools. You’ve made a lot of great connections during your time in the service. Transition is the right time to start putting them to work. Get in touch with friends and fellow veterans. It’s just a good thing anyway to re-establish friendships as you transition.
  1. Take advantage of your status. Many organizations are committed to helping veterans find a good job. Look for groups with programs for service members such as:

U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Hiring Our Heroes initiative

Soldier for Life

Marine for Life

Military Officers Association of America

Non-Commissioned Officers Association

United Service Organizations

Your military experience is valuable to many employers. Not many people have your proven work ethic and dedication. Like everything, finding the right job is a matter of being prepared and doing the work. You’re in the military. You know how to make that happen. And there are lots of people and resources who want to back you up.

Source: MilitaryOneSource

US Department of Labor launches new monthly series of workshops to provide employment assistance to transitioning military spouses

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The U.S. Department of Labor has launched a new monthly series of career workshops to provide employment assistance to transitioning military spouses. Participation is free and classes are open to all transitioning military spouses.

The launch follows a successful pilot program in October 2020.

The workshops are part of the department’s Transition Assistance Program series targeted at helping military spouses plan and prepare for their job search in pursuit of their employment goals. Offered by the department’s Veterans’ Employment and Training Service, the workshops are part of the Transition Employment Assistance for Military Spouses’ curriculum.

Registration is now open for the following February classes:

  • Marketing Me: Focuses on using marketing techniques in a job search. Explores networking opportunities and uses multiple resources to develop an action plan.
  • Your Next Move: Reviews online resources provided by the department to define and explore career opportunities. Shows how spouses can use labor market research to choose a career path or develop a job search plan.
  • Career Credentials: Defines professional credentials and their importance, illustrates pathways for credentialing and identifies license and credential portability resources.
  • Resume Essentials: Designed to help spouses create the most effective resume possible with guidance from trained facilitators, and to learn how to evaluate resumes and understand job application techniques.

VETS will offer the workshops monthly, and has scheduled the first workshops from Feb. 16 through Feb. 19. The agency is offering them virtually. Register and review a full schedule of classes.

A cooperative effort among the department’s Veterans’ Employment and Training Service and the departments of Defense, Education, Homeland Security and Veterans Affairs, the Small Business Administration, and the Office of Personnel Management, the Transition Assistance Program provides information, tools and training to service members and their spouses in preparation for a return to civilian life. Approximately 200,000 men and women transition from U.S. military service to civilian life annually.

Source: DOL

Kellie Pickler, Wilmer Valderrama Named USO Global Ambassadors

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In honor of its 80th anniversary, the United Service Organizations (USO) has named country singer and actress Kellie Pickler, and producer, actor and activist Wilmer Valderrama as USO Global Ambassadors.

USO tour veterans Pickler and Valderrama will help lead the effort for Americans, united in spirit and action, to give more than thanks to the military community.

“We are honored to have these two longtime advocates come on board as USO Global Ambassadors,” said J.D. Crouch II, USO CEO and president. “Kellie and Wilmer have seen firsthand the importance of the USO mission and the impact it can have when we express the nation’s gratitude to our Armed Forces. We hope their continued support will invite more Americans to join them in honoring service members and their families.”

As USO Global Ambassadors, Pickler and Valderrama will support the organization’s Give More Than Thanks initiative, a campaign encouraging all Americans to find actionable ways to express their gratitude for the service and sacrifice of our troops and their families. Throughout the year, Pickler and Valderrama will participate in events and entertainment engagements for service members, raise awareness of our military’s needs and share ways Americans can help the USO give more than thanks.

Pickler and Valderrama have dedicated their time and talents to give back to service members and their families throughout their careers, including touring together in 2018 for the annual USO Holiday Tour with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Ways Pickler and Valderrama have served with the USO include:

Kellie Pickler

  • First tour in 2007 to Iraq
  • 12 USO tours visiting 13 international locations (Afghanistan, Germany, Iraq, Kosovo, United Kingdom, Iraq, Kuwait, Bahrain, Kyrgyzstan, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Norway) and a ship at sea; and three domestic locations
  • Five USO Holiday Tours with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (2008, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2018)
  • USO Military Virtual Programming (MVP) session with husband, Kyle Jacobs, broadcast worldwide to 34 locations in the U.S., Qatar, Guam and Japan
  • Recipient of Department of Defense Spirit of Hope Award, Operation Troop Aid Chris Kyle Patriot Award and USO of North Carolina Heart for the Warrior Award

“I am honored to join the USO as a Global Ambassador for their 80th anniversary of supporting America’s military, especially in support of this campaign encouraging all Americans to give more than thanks,” shares Pickler. “The USO has allowed me so many opportunities to serve those who serve us, and this is another way I can help shine a light on something that matters … supporting our servicemen, servicewomen, their families, and letting them know we don’t take what they do for granted.”

Wilmer Valderrama

  • First tour in 2007 to Germany
  • Eight USO tours visiting nine international locations (Germany, Poland, South Korea, Afghanistan, Djibouti, Greenland, Norway, Bahrain, Iraq) and a ship at sea; and three domestic locations
  • One USO Holiday Tour with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in 2018
  • More than 40 USO performances
  • USO MVP session broadcast worldwide to 13 installations in the U.S., United Arab Emirates, Germany, Japan, Italy and Iraq

“Touring with the USO has been one of the proudest moments of my career because it has given me the chance to pay my respect and personally express my gratitude to our servicemen and women,” Valderrama said. “I feel honored to now serve as a USO Global Ambassador, to help others understand how important it is to support the military and encourage Americans to follow our heroes example in becoming a more united community in a more united nation.”

Generations of Americans have answered the call to step up, serve and sacrifice. Wherever they are deployed or stationed—on the front lines overseas or the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic response at home—the USO stands by our heroes in uniform. Since 1941, the USO has been a resource for more than 40 million individuals, from providing morale-boosting entertainment to delivering millions of care packages.

To learn more about ways to give more than thanks, visit USO.org/morethanthanks. Follow the USO’s Give More Than Thanks campaign and join the conversation using the hashtag #MoreThanThanks on social media.

About the USO:

The USO strengthens America’s military service members by keeping them connected to family, home and country, throughout their service to the nation. At hundreds of locations worldwide, we are united in our commitment to connect our service members and their families through countless acts of caring, comfort and support. The USO is a private nonprofit organization, not a government agency. Our programs, services and entertainment tours are made possible by the American people, support of our corporate partners and the dedication of our volunteers and staff. To join us in this important mission and learn more about the USO, please visit USO.org and follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram.

Meet the bomber pilot who will be leading the Super Bowl flyover

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Sarah the female bomber pilot close up image of her in military uniform smiling

By Jennifer Holton Fox29 Philadelphia

Captain Sarah Kociuba has a pretty impressive resume. She’s a B-2 instructor pilot, has flown more than 90 combat missions, and has more than 1,700 flying hours in five different aircraft.

Come Sunday, she’ll be adding “Super Bowl flyover flight lead.”

“It is very exciting, I am very humbled,” she told FOX 13. “We are certainly doing our prep for it.”

Kociuba, call sign “Gucci,” will lead a formation in her B-2 Spirit, along with a B-1B Lancer and a B-52 Stratofortress. She says a lot of planning helps missions like these come together.

“We’ve been working for weeks making this plan very precise, so that we can execute it,” she said. “So we’ll all brief together, and plan together, and make this rejoin happen.”

The military flyover on Super Bowl Sunday is planned down to the second.

The bombers are coming from three different bases in the Dakotas and Missouri. It’s a mission that takes coordination, and precision timing.

First, they’ll meet up in a whiskey area – that’s military jargon for “restricted airspace” – before the pass over Raymond James Stadium and Super Bowl LV.

“We will rejoin very low altitude, very high speed and very close together in this whiskey area, and then we’ll work our timing, and then do the flyover,” she explained.

The entire flight will take about seven or eight hours round trip because the Air Force is including training in the sortie. That means Kociuba won’t return to base until long after the fourth quarter ends.

“I’m not going to get to watch the game, so I hope there’s no spoilers before I land,” she added. “I’m going to have to watch it afterwards!”

Read the complete article on FOX29 News Philadelphia

Soldier is Seeking Support to Help Save Her Rescued Puppy From Being Left Behind

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US Soldier holding her puppy while sitting on the ground

When one person tries to pay for the expenses to bring a rescued soldier’s dog back to the US from overseas it’s a costly endeavor.

When 1,000 people come together and each chip in just $5 it’s a total game changer. With a small donation like that they can help to change the life of the soldier who has adopted the dog, and help ensure that the dog will live a healthy and safe life in land of the free.

“We absolutely want to help bring PupPup back to America. These overseas rescues are extremely challenging and have a high cost,” explains Robert Misseri, co-founder of Paws of War. “If we don’t step in to save these dogs and cats, the soldier is forced to leave behind an animal they rescued from a bad situation. An animal they deeply love left behind can become subject to abuse, neglect and unfortunately death. It sounds harsh but that is the truth on the ground for our hero soldiers.”

PupPup is a puppy that Army Sergeant Char, who is stationed overseas, fell in love with and rescued. Her mother was a stray dog who hung around the base and ended up giving birth to a litter of puppies trying to hide them from danger. The dog was moved to a safer place, giving her the ability to care for her babies. On several occasions the soldier’s had to hide the dog and her puppies from many potential deadly threats.

While all the other puppies were quick to warm up to the soldier’s, one stayed hidden. She was too shy and afraid to come out. Sgt. Char was immediately drawn to the one that was so shy, she focused her love and attention on this little pup trying to help the puppy get comfortable and ensure she was being fed. She ended up gaining the trust of the dog she named PupPup, and they formed a loving bond. Now that Sgt. Char is scheduled to head back to the US, she can’t bear the thought of having to leave her dog behind. She knows PupPup won’t survive. Sgt. Char is still the only person PupPup will go to.

“I’m desperately asking Paws of War to help me bring my beautiful helpless PupPup back to America with me because I can’t stand the thought of leaving her behind,” says Sgt. Char. “This spot can be very harsh to dogs and I fear she will die if she is left behind. Plus, we have formed such a strong bond that means everything to me. I can’t turn my back on her and would be forever grateful for the help to get her home.”

The only way Paws of War can successfully bring PupPup back to America to live with Sgt. Char in a loving forever home is with financial help from people in the community. Paws of War is asking for donations to help cover the costs of bringing this special dog home. They are urgently accepting donations so they can save this dog and help this soldier.

To see get more information or make a donation, visit the site: https://pawsofwar.networkforgood.com/projects/122504-pup-pup.

Paws of War has helped numerous soldiers to bring their rescued animals back to the U.S. However, this year the mission is more challenging to pull off. The pandemic has added additional quarantines, medical treatments and challenges transporting animals from remote locations. There are a severely limited number of flights coming into the U.S., especially those allowing dogs. Plus, flights from overseas are costly, and there is a lot of red tape that needs to be addressed and logistics to overcome.

Paws of War helps soldiers bring their rescued dogs and cats back to America after serving their country overseas through it’s War Torn Pups and Cats program. Those who would like to learn more about supporting Paws of War and its mission can go online to: http://pawsofwar.org.

About Paws of War

Paws of War is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) charitable organization that provides assistance to military members and their pets. They rescue cats and dogs in the U.S. and overseas. They train dogs to be service, support and companion animals for veterans and first responders. To learn more about Paws of War and the programs provided or to make a donation visit its site at: http://pawsofwar.org.

Air Force Veteran Becomes New Mexico’s First Senator

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Air Force Veteran Senator Harold Pope Jr. poses outside wearing a suit and tie and smiling

By Natalie Rodgers

In his first-ever political race, retired Air Force Captain and Democratic Candidate Harold Pope Jr. became New Mexico’s first black Senator against Republican opponent and longtime Senator, Sander Rue.

Senator Pope will be representing New Mexico’s 23rd district, making the coronavirus and the need for public education the focal points of his platform.

Before being elected into the Senate, Pope balanced his military service with his college studies, serving as a dental technician in the Air Force by day and taking classes at night. After earning his degree in biochemistry, Pope went on to serve in the Air Force for over twenty years, mainly working as a security cooperation officer, a program manager and a chemist.

His military experience, along with his extensive work in non-profit organizations and his time working in education, helped to shape Pope’s focal points for his platform: community and education. Throughout his campaign, Pope advocated heavily for the importance of public education, healthcare, and race issues–a heavy contributor in his campaign,

“We have to see other people in those positions and see people that look like us,” Pope told the Coloradoan. “We really have to see people that look like us or came from our situation.”

Though the first black Senator for New Mexico, Pope was not made aware of his potential status until later in his campaign.

“I just want to set the example and take a lot of pride in it,” Pope said of his representation, “but because I am the first, I don’t want to be the last. I just want to be that voice and have that seat at the table.”

While in office, Pope is hoping to expand upon his platform in addition to help foster a more inclusive community in New Mexico.

Source: Coloradoan and Popefornm.com

Providing Business, DVBE. Employment & Educational Opportunities For Veterans

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