Remembering America’s Military

LinkedIn
Memorial Day

Throughout American history, men and women have loved our country so deeply that they were willing to give their all to preserve its safety and freedom. On the last Monday in May, our nation honors the selfless heroes who gave their lives to defend the land we love and the freedoms we believe everyone deserves.

Memorial Day was first observed as Decoration Day on May 30, 1868. People visit cemeteries and memorials, and volunteers often place American flags on each grave site at national cemeteries. Often people decorate the graves of the Civil War soldiers buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

A national moment of remembrance takes place at 3:00 p.m. local time.

The custom of honoring ancestors by cleaning cemeteries and decorating graves is an ancient and worldwide tradition.

Ways to Honor Our Fallen Heroes
This tradition continues on Memorial Day when we reflect on the courage of service members who gave their lives for the freedoms we enjoy. Here’s what you and your family can do to remember these heroes this Memorial Day:

✪✪Display the flag—The U.S. flag is flown at half-staff from dawn until noon on Memorial Day. Some people also choose to fly the POW/MIA flag to honor prisoners of war and those missing in.

✪✪Visit a cemetery—Honor the memory of a family member or another veteran by putting flowers on their grave.

✪✪Join the national moment of silence—Pause wherever you are at 3 p.m. for a moment of silence to remember and honor the fallen.

✪✪Attend local parades—Many cities and towns have Memorial Day parades to remember those who gave their lives for our country.

✪✪Wear red poppies—Red poppies are worn on Memorial Day in honor of those who died serving the nation during war.

Source: militaryonesource.mil

Landing Home—Now on Amazon Prime

LinkedIn
landing-home-movie-poster

For many combat veterans, deployment doesn’t neatly end when their tour is up. The brain, once engaged at combat level, simply can’t turn off and pivot to the mundane details of civilian life in the time it takes to touch down on American soil. Returning home in any real way takes a different set of skills—skills that many veterans see as elusive at best. Maybe even impossible to attain.

To that end, “Landing Home” is a seven-part TV series that shares the compelling story of a veteran trying to adjust to civilian life after leaving the military. It deftly takes the audience into the mind of a combat soldier freed from duty but never free, pulls back the curtain on the lasting damage of war to the human psyche, and helps the viewer understand that returning home can represent only the beginning of a different kind of war.

Leaning into authenticity, the series includes more 20 veterans in cast and crew, many of whom saw action. Douglas Taurel plays Luke, an Army veteran who served in Afghanistan. While he decides to leave the military in order to be with his family, he soon realizes that this is much harder than he ever imagined. Something as simple as a birthday party for his five-year-old daughter can quickly become overwhelming and trigger his post-traumatic stress disorder.

“My goal with the project is to give people a true sense of the emotional and psychological effect war has on our veterans and why it’s so hard for them and their families to assimilate back into normal life,” Taurel said. “We owe our veterans and their families so much. We all need to understand the sacrifices our men and women in uniform make and what their families endure. We can never thank them enough.”

WATCH THE TRAILER!

Taurel is best known for his gripping one-man play, “The American Soldier,” which has performed in 16 cities and 11 states with notable spaces like the Kennedy Center, Off-Broadway, Library of Congress, and the American Legion’s National Headquarters to name a few. This play also touches on many aspects of war and explores the sacrifices and challenges our veterans and their families face as they return home from combat.

“Landing Home” is available on Amazon, Amazon Prime and Vimeo On Demand.

The TV series will help the civilian population understand what it means to serve our country. To let everyone know that veterans face an even bigger, sometimes hidden struggle to adjust to a normal way of life.
– Joe Reynolds / Vietnam Veteran

So wish the whole world especially every Veteran could see it. What your work, art, craft, talent represents is “Something that matters in life”…don’t ever forget or DOUBT that!
– John Caoli / Iraq Veteran

I just purchased your series Landing Home and already in just the first episode I can feel the resurfacing of what it felt like for me 29 years ago. That is when I came home from a war to begin fighting my own personal battle. I am honored to know you and honored by the work you do for us!
– Lynn Santosuosso / Iraq Veteran

About Douglas Taurel
Taurel has been nominated for Innovative Theater Award as well as the United Kingdom prestigious Amnesty International Award for this work with The American Soldier. He’s appeared in numerous television shows including The Affair, Mr. Robot, The Americans, Blue Bloods, Person of Interest, The Following, Damages, NYC 22, Believe, and Nurse Jackie. The Los Angeles Times said his work on Nurse Jackie, “Nurse Jackie gets her most fascinating character yet to date.”

He was commissioned by the Library of Congress to write, create and perform his second solo show, An American Soldier’s Journey Home which commemorates the ending of the First World War and tells the story of Irving Greenwald, a soldier in the 308 Regiment and part of the Lost Battalion. He has performed the play twice at the Library of Congress.

Wounded Army Corporal Inspires Boston’s Wounded Vet Run

LinkedIn
Vincent Mannion-Brodeur in his army uniform on the field

By Kellie Speed

When Jeff and Maura Brodeur received the devastating call that would change their life forever— that their only son had been critically injured in Iraq and may not make it—they never could have imagined how far he would come today.

U.S. Army Private Vincent Mannion-Brodeur was just 19 when he was deployed to Iraq where he served as a Parachute Infantryman in the B-2-505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division and Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, Honor Guard.

On March 11, 2007, the Massachusetts native was checking a house for insurgents when an improvised explosive device detonated, killing his sergeant and leaving him with deep shrapnel wounds that ravaged his upper torso. In addition, his left arm was nearly blown off and he sustained a traumatic brain injury that required the removal of his cranium and part of his frontal lobe.

As a courageous recipient of the Bronze Star and Purple Heart, Vincent, who retired as a corporal, became the inspiration behind Boston’s Wounded Vet Run, a motorcycle run that honors wounded veterans of New England.

“Ten years ago, Vincent was the first recipient of the Boston Wounded Vet Run, which was used to supplement a VA Special Adaptive Housing Grant he earned that took two years of paperwork to complete,” said Jeff Brodeur, Vincent’s father and an Army veteran himself, adding that Vincent will be honored once again this year at the tenth annual Boston’s Wounded Vet Run being held in September.

Vincent Mannion-Brodeur holding an award
Vincent Mannion-Brodeur holding an award

“He was in a wheelchair at the time so we used that money to put in new stairs and a new walkway. We used the funds raised to make modifications for accessibility to the outside of our home. It’s really nice to have him being honored again on the run 10 years later because it all started with Vincent and Andy (Biggio) who is the founder.”

Since Boston’s initial event a decade ago, the motorcycle runs have increased in popularity, now becoming available in major cities nationwide raising money to provide assistance to severely wounded veterans like Vincent to improve their quality of life. All proceeds from the runs go directly to veterans to assist with housing modifications or mobility and transportation needs, including wheelchairs and cars, along with other basic requirements.

After surviving a yearlong coma, lengthy hospital stays, 47 surgeries and years of rehabilitation to relearn the simplest of tasks—from walking and talking to eating and showering—Vincent and his family have become an inspiration. Overcoming all odds after being told he might never be able to walk or talk again, Vincent, who can often be found smiling, saying, “God bless America,” still faces lifelong daily challenges but that hasn’t broken his fun-loving spirit.

His parents, who are both veterans, fought successfully to become the first on the East Coast—and one of the first families in the nation—to have their son transferred to a private medical facility to continue his care, paving the way for many other wounded soldiers.

Vincent Mannion-Brodeur holding an award with his doctor
Vincent Mannion-Brodeur holding an award with his doctor

The Veterans Administration initially wanted to transfer Vincent to its Tampa trauma facility but his parents were concerned over the level of care he would receive. “Boston has some of the best hospitals in the nation and we won approval for Vincent to receive private care for his severe TBI at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital instead of having to go to a Veterans Administration facility,” said Jeff, an Army veteran and also the National President of the Korean War Veteran’s Association. “The polytrauma hospitals back then didn’t offer the specialized care that we knew Boston could provide.”

Their steadfast determination in finding the best care and rehabilitation for their son paved the way for the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010, authorizing the Veterans Administration to, “establish a wide range of new services to support certain caregivers of eligible Post 9/11 Veterans.” The additional benefits offered to families of veterans now include a monthly stipend, health care coverage, and travel expenses (including lodging and per diem) while accompanying veterans undergoing care, respite care and mental health services and counseling.

Even Out of Uniform, Service to Country Continues

LinkedIn
Allen West giving a speech

By Annie Nelson

In my journey with our military and veteran communities, I have had the honor of befriending several amazing people. One of those men is former Army Lieutenant Colonel and US Congressmen Allen West. Lt Col West is such a wonderful man. He is a leader, speaker, author, former Congressmen and is now running for the position of head of the GOP (Republican Party) for the state of Texas.

Through Facetime we sat down and discussed a few topics to share. Mind you, it was just a few weeks ago that Lt Col West was in a terrible motorcycle accident going 75 mph. As an avid motorcyclist who has spent the last 35 years riding, he is truly a walking miracle today.

AN: After retiring from the Army was your transition difficult?

LCW: When I transitioned from the military to civilian life, it was a bit harder for me. We relocated to South Florida and I had to get plugged in to new surroundings, find veterans to connect with and get that veteran bond going. It’s easier if you retire and stay close to a military installation where you keep the bond of brotherhood/sisterhood. I think it’s so important for those of us who have served to stay plugged into our community after service. We support each other and have a bond like no other.

AN: How did you decide to run and win for Congress?

LCW: While living down in Florida, I was actually challenged by my friend, Donna, who said, “Just because you are not serving in the military does not mean you are done with your service to this country. You need to run for Congress and continue serving out of uniform.” So, it began. I feel it’s very important for veterans to run for office. We need veterans to lead this country! We took an oath and that is for life, so what better way to continue to serve once we are out of uniform.

AN: What was the biggest challenge serving in Congress?

LCW: The biggest challenge was knowing that the people you serve with do not necessarily follow the same values, ethics and integrity that you are used to in the military. That was the toughest part of the job and you never get used to it. It can be very enticing to be in Congress. Most look into the light and forget why they’re there and what they are supposed to be doing, which is representing the people. People head to Washington, DC as one person and, after being there a short time, become a typical politician.

AN: What was most rewarding in your years in Congress?

LCW: For me, there were rewarding times while serving when I was able to help veterans, look up their records, get awards given that were overlooked, etc. Truly helping my constituents out—that was the most rewarding part of the job.

AN: How do you feel about the current climate in the country?

LCW: I feel we are in an ideological war in this country today. We are a country ruled by law and order. Right now, we are being run by mob mentality and we must get a handle on it! We have not done a very good job with that. I like to use the analogy of the child throwing a tantrum in the grocery store. If you do not immediately discipline that child and demand that behavior to stop, you will always have a child throwing a tantrum.

AN: Where do you see yourself in the next 5-10 years?

LCW: Proverbs 3: 5-6 “Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him. and he will make your paths straight.” That would have to be my answer. I was just in a motorcycle accident going 75 miles an hour. We are doing this interview just 3 short weeks later. Everyone that knows motorcycles knows with an accident going 75 mph I should be dead. I am a walking miracle. So, I will continue to follow His path for my life staying true to God, Country and the state of Texas.

AN: What advice would you share with men/women about to transition from their service?

LCW: I would say first and foremost that you must stay plugged in to the veteran community. If you stay local or move away, get connected with veterans in your community. We as older veterans need to do better as well as be mentors for our newly transitioned brothers and sisters. I truly feel this is the first line of defense in the suicide epidemic we are facing now. The bond of the military brotherhood/sisterhood is strong and one that must carry you through your life.

AN: Where is the best place for people to follow you and what you are up to?

LCW: My website of course ~ and we are on other social media as well:

Click here for the Old School Patriot’s Website

Click here for Allen’s Instagram:

Click here for Allen’s Twitter:

Click here for Allen’s Facebook:

Thank you to Lt Col West and thank you to anyone who has worn the uniform for our great USA!

Empowering Veterans at the Seventh Annual Warrior Community Integration Symposium

LinkedIn
Sal Giunta and Clint Romesha

By Jim Lorraine, President and CEO of America’s Warrior Partnership

The Warrior Community Integration Symposium has served as an annual gathering for the past seven years to empower communities to empower veterans, their families and caregivers.

Our team at America’s Warrior Partnership is transforming this year’s event into a free and virtual experience from August 25 – 27 that is open to all who wish to attend.

Sessions and panels will cover topics ranging from best practices for veteran-serving nonprofits to inspirational presentations from well-known veterans. Our goal is for every attendee to walk away with a greater understanding of how they can help make their community a more empowering environment for veterans.

Many presentations will focus on the transition from military to civilian life, and few individuals better embody the possibilities for veterans than our keynote speaker this year: Navy Lt. Cmdr. and NASCAR driver Jesse Iwuji. Iwuji graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy and was deployed for a total of 15 months to the Arabian Gulf on two Naval Warships, and after transitioning to the Naval Reserves, he debuted in the NASCAR Truck Series where he had a Top 25 finish. Outside of racing and his Navy service, LCDR Iwuji owns a drag racing events company and a trucking business.

At the Symposium, Iwuji will share how he has managed the transition from active-duty service to professional sports and business management. His presentation will shine a light on the wide range of career and lifestyle choices that veterans can consider for their civilian lives. The diversity of possibilities for veterans is also reflected in the influential leaders who will introduce each event session, including:

  • Gary Sinise, Chairman and Founder, Gary Sinise Foundation
  • William McRaven, ADM (Ret.), The University of Texas at Austin, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs
  • Mike Linnington, LTG (Ret.), CEO, Wounded Warrior Project
  • Douglas Petno, CEO of Commercial Banking, JP Morgan Chase & Co.
  • Harriet Dominique, Senior VP, Corporate Social Responsibility and Community Affairs, USAA
  • Catharine Grimes, Director of Corporate Philanthropy, Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation
  • Mike Hall, Executive Director, Three Rangers Foundation

Medal of Honor Fireside Chat

Another session aiming to inspire attendees is a fireside chat that Fox News anchor Jon Scott will lead with Medal of Honor recipients Sal Giunta, Clint Romesha and Kyle White. Each of these men served in the U.S. Army during the War in Afghanistan, and they will share how their military experience affected the decisions they made upon transitioning to their civilian lives. Their conversation will highlight the value that veterans can bring to their communities even after their service ends.

Empowering Women Veterans

The Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) will lead a panel discussion on the evolving needs of women veterans, with leaders of WWP teams ranging from Physical Health and Wellness to Government and Community Relations contributing their insights. The panel will empower community organizations to better understand how they can collaborate with women veterans to create more effective services and programs.

Veteran Purpose

Harriet Dominique of USAA will introduce a session on the importance of veteran voices, including how veterans can be leaders within the workforce and broader community. Mission Roll Call Executive Director Garrett Cathcart will moderate the discussion with former Green Beret and NFL player Nate Boyer, Medal of Honor recipient Flo Groberg, and LinkedIn Head of Military and Veteran Programs Sarah Roberts. The group will focus on how veterans can make their voices heard on social issues and empower their community to overcome any adversity.

Veterans in the Workplace

Multiple sessions at this year’s event will cover workplace, employment and entrepreneurship topics for veterans. Misty Sutsman Fox of the Institute for Veterans and Military Families at Syracuse University will moderate one of the first of these sessions with a focus on helping communities build stronger entrepreneurship ecosystems. Additionally, Douglas Petno, CEO of Commercial Banking at JP Morgan Chase & Co., will introduce a panel discussion diving into the many facets involved with empowering veterans to thrive in the workplace, from initial recruitment to their long-term career progression.

The full Symposium agenda breaks down each of these panels and other sessions that will take place over the course of the week. The agenda and information on how to register to virtually attend the event at no cost are available at AmericasWarriorPartnership.org/Symposium.

About the Author

Jim Lorraine is President and CEO of America’s Warrior Partnership, a national nonprofit that empowers communities to empower veterans. The organization’s mission starts with connecting community groups with local veterans to understand their unique situations. With this knowledge in mind, America’s Warrior Partnership connects local groups with the appropriate resources to proactively and holistically support veterans at every stage of their lives. Learn more about the organization at www.AmericasWarriorPartnership.org.

Photo: Sal Giunta (left) and Clint Romesha

America Salutes You and Perfect Technician Academy Team Up For Veteran Community

LinkedIn
america salutes you logos

Since 2016, America Salutes You has been one of the year’s most anticipated concert events, previously featuring superstar performers such as Billy Gibbons, Cindy Lauper, Warren Haynes, Nancy Wilson, Trace Adkins, Andra Day, Stephen Stills and more.

The 2020 concert is set to take place this fall in Nashville, Tennessee at one of the nation’s most renowned music venues, The Grand Ole Opry House, and promises to be the organization’s largest and most star-studded concert yet with the help of one of their new sponsors, Perfect Technician Academy.

Perfect Technician Academy, a veteran-focused trades training school based out of Weatherford, Texas, and America Salutes You entered into a partnership for 2020 in an effort to push forward both organizations’ shared mission of giving back to and supporting America’s veteran community.

The nationally televised event has served to raise tens of thousands of dollars in public contributions to benefit a continuously growing number of organizations across the country working to aid and protect our military veterans and their families.

“Less than one percent of our population serves to make the world safe for the rest of us. Teaming up with and combining resources with Perfect Technician Academy is one way that we can help give back to the men and women who have paid the ultimate price on our behalf,” says Bob Okun, CEO of America Salutes You.

90% percent of all money raised through the fundraiser will be granted to nonprofit organizations benefiting veteran needs, including healthcare, mental health services, housing, education, jobs and career services, legal, financial readiness and much more.

The popularity and recognition behind America Salutes You, while due largely to the broadcast concerts, is primarily owed to the generous sponsors and individuals throughout the United States that resonate with the cause of the organization.

Donations will be raised via text and online fundraising during the broadcast, with all funds raised going to the America Salutes You Campaign. So, be sure to tune in this fall to enjoy a concert spectacular unlike any you’ve witnessed before and show your support.

About America Salutes You

The mission of America Salutes You is to honor and raise awareness of our veterans, service members, first responders and their loved ones. Together, with the backing of a wide variety of sponsors, partners, and celebrities, America Salutes You has become a premier veteran organization and an unrivaled television event.

SOURCE America Salutes You, LLC

Army Sergeant Seeks Help to Bring Two Rescue Dogs Back to America

LinkedIn
Army Sergeant in uniform playing outside in a dirt area with her two dogsdogs

Being stationed overseas when you are in the military can leave you longing for home. One of the great things that happen to soldiers is when they are able to befriend a stray dog.

Sergeant Corina Kimball knows all too well the joy that it brings while she is there. But she also knows the heartache of having to leave them behind when it comes time to returning to the U.S., which has made her desperate to get them back home with her. She’s turned to Paws of War, because they have helped many soldiers relocate their dogs when it was time to head back to the states.

“We know how important these relationships are to our soldiers and how the dogs help them get through challenging times,” explains Robert Misseri, co-founder of Paws of War. “We also know how important it is that they get to bring the dogs home with them. We make it our mission to ensure that it happens, but we can’t do it alone. We need the public to help contribute to this mission if we are to be successful with it.”

Kimball, who has now made it back home to the US, is eagerly waiting for her dogs to join her. While stationed overseas, she found two stray dogs who would roam around, struggling to survive. They were malnourished and afraid of people. Over time, they came to trust her, and the three of them formed a strong bond. She fell in love with the two dogs, which she named Cinnamon and Pepper, bonding and finding companionship with them.

The remote Army base where Kimball was stationed is located in area of the world that can be dangerous for stray dogs. She knows that by leaving the dogs behind they are being put in a dangerous situation and their future will be bleak. She is desperate to have the two dogs make their way from overseas to her home, where they can live out the rest of their life in a loving family.

“Timing is crucial in a situation like this,” added Misseri. “Without Sgt. Kimball there to care for Cinnamon and Pepper the dogs are in a dangerous situation. Together, we can make bringing the dogs back to Montana a reality for this soldier.”

While relocating a dog from overseas to the USA is possible, it’s not easy and it’s not cheap. Paws of War works with other local animal organizations to ensure the mission takes place and that the dog is legally and safely brought to live with the soldier they are helping. Those who would like to make a donation to help relocate the dogs can log online:

pawsofwar.networkforgood.com/projects/online/campaign.

Paws of War rescues dogs, provides them with proper training, and then pairs them with veterans, all free of charge. They also help soldiers bring their dog back to America after serving overseas. Those who would like to learn more about supporting Paws of War and its mission can go online to: pawsofwar.org.

About Paws of War

Paws of War is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) charitable organization that provides assistance to military members and their pets. To learn more about Paws of War and the programs provided or to make a donation visit its site at: pawsofwar.org.

“DESERT ONE” Opens Friday, August 21!

LinkedIn
Desert One military helicoper on the ground with people nearby

New York, NY – 40 years later, one of the most daring military rescue attempts in U.S. history is coming to the big screen.

Greenwich Entertainment will release the acclaimed documentary feature “Desert One” from two-time Academy Award® winner Barbara Kopple (“Harlan County USA” and “American Dream”) on Friday, August 21. The documentary feature, produced by HISTORY®, recounts the April 24/25, 1980 thrilling attempt to rescue 52 US citizens who were taken hostage by Iranian revolutionaries in Tehran.

The film includes a wealth of unearthed archival sources, as well as intimate interviews with President Jimmy Carter, Vice President Walter Mondale, Ted Koppel, former hostages, journalists, and Iranian student revolutionaries who orchestrated the take-over of the American Embassy in Tehran. Evocative new animation and never before heard satellite phone recordings of President Carter talking to his generals as the mission unfolds, bring audiences closer than anyone has ever gotten to being on the inside for this history making operation.

“Desert One” is the story of Americans working together to overcome the most difficult problem of their lives. When radical Islamists take fifty-two American diplomats and citizens hostage inside Iran, Carter secretly green-lights the training for a rescue mission. America’s Special Forces soldiers also find themselves in uncharted territory, planning a top-secret rescue of unprecedented scale and complexity.

Driven by deep empathy toward the kidnapped Americans, the heart-pounding and unforeseen events the rescue team participated in will forever unite them.

WATCH THE TRAILER!!

OFFICIAL WEBSITE

RedWhiteandCool Program Draws Vets into Refrigeration Industry

LinkedIn
Five RedWhiteandColl founders stand in line together smiling

The Refrigerating Engineers and Technicians Association (RETA) and Smithfield Foods, Inc. are pleased to announce RedWhiteandCool, an initiative focused on recruiting, training and hiring transitioning military veterans into the natural refrigeration industry as refrigeration technicians.

“There is a shortage of skilled labor in our country, and the commercial and natural refrigeration industry is not exempt,” said Lois Stirewalt of RETA. “There are currently more than 40,000 jobs open nationally for refrigeration technicians. At the same time, many veterans remain unemployed once they transition to civilian live. RedWhiteandCool is taking action to address this very issue.”

The RedWhiteandCool program will work hand in hand with the Department of Defense and transitioning military personnel, family members and veterans to recruit them into the commercial refrigeration industry. The partnership, administered by RETA’s non-profit arm— RETA-Training Institute (RETA-TI)—in conjunction with the Department of Defense SkillBridge program, is the organization’s newest Career Skills Program (CSP).

Transitioning military veterans met with program staff during an information session in February to learn more about the training program and refrigeration industry. Participants will receive certification testing at the end of the program and have the opportunity to interview for a career with Smithfield Foods as part of the company’s veteran hiring initiative.

“Supporting the men and women who have served our country is core to who we are as an American company,” said Keira Lombardo, executive vice president of corporate affairs and compliance for Smithfield Foods and president of the Smithfield Foundation. “We owe a debt of gratitude to our veterans; this training and transition program is just one way we demonstrate our appreciation.”

For more information, please visit: www.RETA.com and/or www.smithfieldfoods.com

Photo:
Bruce Owens, Director, Infrastructure Engineering (Smithfield Foods); Clarence Scott, Talent Acquisition Specialist (Smithfield Foods); Lois Stirewalt (RETA); Jim Barron (RETA executive director); Troy Vandenberg, Military Talent Acquisition Manager (Smithfield Foods)

Marine Corps Marathon canceled for first time in 45-year history because of pandemic

LinkedIn
large group of Marine Corps marathon runners

The COVID-19 pandemic has claimed yet another event for long-distance running enthusiasts.

The Marine Corps Marathon, with its picturesque course that takes runners through some of the most historic parts of Arlington, Virginia, and Washington, D.C., will not be held in person in 2020 for the first time in its 45-year history. The main event had been scheduled for Sunday, Oct. 25.

“We explored various approaches to safely execute a live event and held numerous meetings with Marine Corps leadership, local government and public health officials,” said Rick Nealis, director of the Marine Corps Marathon Organization (MCMO) in a statement. “We understand this is disappointing news for many, but we could no longer envision a way to gather together in compliance with safety guidelines.”

Race organizers will instead offer participants opportunities to register and complete distances for certification via the Marine Marathon website.

“Health and safety are our top priorities during this challenging time,” said Libby Garvey, Arlington County Board Chair. “The Marine Corps Marathon is a treasured event and tradition in our community that Arlingtonians look forward to each year. As we celebrate the race’s 45th anniversary this year, we will be enthusiastically and virtually cheering on each runner. We can’t wait to welcome these dedicated athletes and fans back to Arlington in person in 2021.”

Continue on to USA Today to read the complete article.

Navy Announces First Black Female Tactical Aircraft Pilot in 110 Years of Aviation

LinkedIn
Lt. Madeline Swegle standing in front of NAVY aircraft in uniform smiling

Lt. Madeline Swegle is soaring to new heights in the U.S. Navy as she will soon become the service’s first Black female fighter pilot.

UPDATE:

The US Navy’s first Black female tactical aircraft pilot, Lt. j.g. Madeline Swegle, received her “wings of gold” on Friday, marking a historic milestone for naval aviation.

Swegle was named a naval aviator and awarded her gold naval aviator wings with 25 classmates during a small ceremony at Naval Air Station Kingsville in Texas, according to the Navy.

“I’m excited to have this opportunity to work harder and fly high performance jet aircraft in the fleet,” Swegle said. “It would’ve been nice to see someone who looked like me in this role; I never intended to be the first. I hope it’s encouraging to other people.”

Recently, the Chief of Naval Air Training congratulated Swegle on Twitter for “completing the Tactical Air (Strike) aviator syllabus,” praising her with a “BZ,” meaning Bravo Zulu or well done.

“Swegle is the @USNavy’s first known Black female TACAIR pilot and will receive her Wings of Gold later this month. HOOYAH!” the tweet read.

Along with the message, the post included two pictures of Swegle wearing her pilot’s uniform.

In one of the images, Swegle smiles next to a T-45C Goshawk training aircraft and in another photo, she is seen exiting the plane after completing her undergraduate syllabus.

According to military newspaper Stars and Stripes, the Virginia native graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 2017.

Swegle is currently assigned to the Redhawks of Training Squadron 21 in Kingsville, Texas, and will be awarded her wings of gold during a ceremony on July 31, according to the Navy.

Rear Adm. Paula D. Dunn, the Navy’s vice chief of information, also applauded Swegle on social media, writing that she is “very proud” of the graduate. “Go forth and kick butt,” she wrote.

Swegle’s sister shared the post on Twitter, writing, “Just my older sister being a boss everyday of her life.”

“Proud of her doesn’t even cover it,” her sibling added.

Continue on to People to read the complete article.

Providing Business, DVBE. Employment & Educational Opportunities For Veterans

Clover Medical

Clover Medical

Verizon

Verizon Wireless

Central Michigan