Transitioning from Service to Startup

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You’ve reached a turning point in your military career. You’re transitioning from active duty to civilian and are considering business ownership as your next move.

Regardless of where you are in the entrepreneurial process—toying with a few business concepts or ready to execute your business plan—the SBA and its partner network are ready to support you.

Let your process begin with Boots to Business, a free entrepreneurship training course offered by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) through the U.S. Department of Defense’s Transition Assistance Program (TAP), and continue with free business counseling, mentorship, and even guidance on accessing capital for your business.

Ready for a smooth transition into business ownership? Here are a few ways you can get started.

  • Sign up for the Boots to Business course. Boots to Business is open to transitioning service members (including National Guard and Reserve) and their spouses on military installations worldwide. The course provides you with an overview of business ownership, including topics like market research, business financing, legal considerations, and additional resources to tap into throughout your entrepreneurial journey. Visit sbavets.force.com for a list of upcoming classes, then contact the transition office on your military installation to register for your desired course date.
  • Already completed your transition but still want to take the course? Boots to Business Reboot brings the course off military installations and into your community. Get in touch with your local Veterans Business Outreach Center (VBOC) for details on upcoming course dates.
  • Connect with your local VBOC. With locations across the nation, VBOCs can provide you with business advice/recommendations and connect you with other business counselors, training programs, and referrals in the SBA network.
  • Get involved in the entrepreneurial community by attending networking events to meet other veteran entrepreneurs. Also consider online communities, which can be found on Facebook, LinkedIn, and even Reddit. These private groups allow you to connect with other veteran entrepreneurs across the globe.

To learn more about the SBA’s veterans programs, visit sba.gov/veterans.

Veteran Entrepreneur Resources

Post Military Education – 5 Questions You Should Ask Before Going Back to School

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Post Military Education – Going back to school is one of life’s big choices. And like all major decisions, it might feel a little overwhelming — particularly if you’re just starting to navigate the civilian world again after military service.

Make it a little easier by breaking your decision down into smaller steps. If you’re on the fence about whether to continue your education, here are five questions you can ask yourself before taking the leap back into school.

 Happy military student in camouflage uniform and graduate cap standing on copy space background

What is my goal? (Or what do I want to be when I grow up?) 

This one tops our list for a reason. Once you have an answer to this critical question, you can start working backwards. Before you commit money and time to returning to school, think about what you hope to achieve by continuing your post military education and where you see your civilian career taking you. You don’t want to take courses without an endgame in mind because then you might end up with classes you don’t need.

If you’re not sure of your goal, consider the skills you mastered in the military and how they might translate to a civilian career. Evaluate your strengths using a test, like with the CareerScope Assessment at the Department of Veterans to identify potential job courses. See a career counselor or find someone in your field of interest to meet with or even shadow for a day. But you don’t have to do any of this alone. The VA also offers free career and educational counseling to those who are about to leave the military or who have recently transitioned.

 Veteran African Man Person Education. Army Soldier - Post Military Education

What should I study?

Once you’ve decided on a career path, it’s time to choose a program of study for your post military education. If you want to work at VA, you can pick from just about any program. As the largest integrated health care system in the nation, we employ hundreds of thousands of clinical and non-clinical staff across the country. We have job opportunities across the spectrum of careers, not just in health care.

 

Where should I go to school?

There are thousands of colleges in the U.S., ranging from two-year technical schools to four-year liberal arts schools. Narrow down your list by finding a school that offers the program you’re interested in and is located nearby if you plan to attend in person. You might also want to consider a school with an active veteran community and resources for former military for post military education.

 The soldier's military tokens are on dollar bills. Concept: cost - Post Military Education

Can I afford it?

We want to make sure the answer to this question is a definitive yes. As a veteran, you may be eligible to receive funding for some or all of your college, graduate school or post military education training program through the GI Bill — not to mention the generous scholarships, loan repayment and reimbursement and partner programs with colleges and universities that are available to VA employees. The VA National Education for Employees Program (VANEEP) scholarship even pays your salary and tuition while you pursue clinical licensure.

 

Do I have time? 

Juggling a career, family life and school can be a delicate balancing act. Be sure you’re at the right place in your life to devote the time you need to your studies. It might be helpful to make a list of the time challenges you foresee and the resources you can put in place to help you manage them. Building this support system now can save you headaches down the road. At VA, you’ll find a culture of continuous learning with flexible work schedules, possible telework options and generous leave to help you manage going back to school.

 

Source: VAntagePoint Blog

 

The Journey Home

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Every year about 200,000 military service members transition from active duty to civilian life, with most of these valuable members of our communities experiencing significant and, at times, painful life changes.

While some return to their “home of record,” most will relocate to a new place offering meaningful employment or job-related education.

During reintegration, each veteran and their loved ones face unique challenges and circumstances. They need adaptable, customized support in vital areas, such as navigating VA services, education, employment, physical and emotional wellness, financial literacy and housing.

In 2018, the VA issued a report, The Military to Civilian Transition: A Review of Historical, Current, and Future Trends. More than 8,500 veterans, active-duty, National Guard and Reserve members and dependents identified their transition challenges:

  • Navigating VA programs, benefits and services 60%
  • Finding a job 55%
  • Adjusting to civilian culture 41%
  • Addressing financial challenges 40%
  • Applying military-learned skills to civilian life 39%

A Pew Research Center survey published in September 2019 indicates that 26 percent of veteran respondents found transitioning to civilian life was very or somewhat difficult. That percentage jumped to 48 percent for veterans who served after 9/11.

A military transitioning veteran at a job fair talking to a woman about future civilian employment
Photo Credit: 143d Sustainment Command

After years of high veteran unemployment, the tide appears to be turning, at least for finding a job. A Bureau of Labor Statistics report in April 2022 shows that veteran unemployment was 4.4 percent in 2021, compared with 5.3 percent for nonveterans. Unemployment for both white and Black veterans was lower than for their nonveteran counterparts. The picture continues to brighten, with veteran unemployment at 3.7 percent in April 2022, compared with 3.9 percent for the country.

Getting a job is just one challenge. Another challenge is keeping it or using it as a launchpad into a rewarding career. Pre-COVID-19 job attrition for veterans is alarming. Forty-three percent of veterans left their first civilian job within a year, and 80 percent before their second anniversary.

Civilian recruiters are increasingly better at matching a veteran’s former Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) in job placement. However, MOS assignment is driven not only by a service member’s Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) but also by the military’s needs.

In short, a veteran’s former MOS might not reflect current passions or career aspirations. Is there a way to improve job retention?

The National Veterans Transition Services, Inc. (NVTSI), or REBOOT for short, a San Diego nonprofit focused on reintegration, is collaborating with the scientific community to develop and test Job-Set, a smart app providing veterans a chance to be matched with actual jobs they qualify for that they might not otherwise find or consider. Using an artificial intelligence-based algorithm to help a user build a profile based on 600+ attributes, Job-Set finds matches in a database of millions of jobs by capitalizing on O*NET, the Credentialing Opportunities On-Line (COOL) program and the National Labor Exchange. Currently in beta testing, Job-Set is free for veteran and military spouse job seekers.

A military service member in camo carrying his daughter as he arrives home at an airport
Photo Source: Defense Visual Information Distribution Service

Reintegration delays cause problems. Homelessness, drug addiction, divorce and incarceration are symptoms of a disjointed support system for transitioning veterans. Today roughly 45,000 nonprofits and numerous federal, state and local government agencies offer support. Navigating through this huge network is both confusing and frustrating.

To help navigate the transition process, NVTSI recently transformed DoD’s Managing Your Transition Timeline manual into an app to help service members manage their transition as early as 24 months before their release. The app also connects users directly to participating local veteran service organizations for a warm hand-off.

In its White Paper After the Sea of Goodwill: A Collective Approach to Veteran Reintegration, published in October 2014, the Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff Office of Reintegration stated:

Written By Kate Karniouchina, Maurice Wilson and Jim Wong

“Now is the time to create a national structure — characterized by functional cooperation, cross-sector collaboration and an integrated network — to establish a no-wrong-door capacity that allows our country to reintegrate effectively veterans and their families as a matter of course.”

 

With this in mind, NVTSI created a prototype Center for Military Veterans Reintegration (CMVR). Designed to be owned and staffed by the local community, the first CMVR opened in Downey, Calif., in May 2022 as both a physical location and an electronic portal (Eco-Center) with easy access for veterans and their families in greater Los Angeles. The CMVR’s purpose is to spur public-private partnerships to streamline the journey home for veterans and ease the burden on loved ones.

All It Takes Is a Spark: Capital for Veteran-Owned VCs

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J.P. Morgan Asset Management announced a new initiative within its Project Spark program, aimed at providing capital to venture capital funds managed by emerging alternative managers that have served in the U.S. military.

In collaboration with JPMorgan Chase’s Military and Veteran’s Affairs division, the mission is to use the firm’s capital and network to close the funding gap for underrepresented managers and to strengthen the veteran ecosystem in the alternatives industry.

As part of the new initiative, the firm intends to commit an initial $25 million to five or more funds across a range of sectors and specialties, to be overseen by the Project Spark investment committee, which is comprised of diverse senior executives across J.P. Morgan Asset Management. The investments seek to support firms managing venture capital and other eligible, private funds founded by U.S. military veterans.

To launch this new activity, the firm along with Vets-In-Tech (ViT), gathered prospects at its first VetVC Summit, hosted at its world headquarters, featuring panel discussions, networking sessions and guest speakers, including JPMorgan Chase Chief Executive Officer, Jamie Dimon.

“Through Project Spark we have demonstrated our desire to directly impact representation of diverse managers in the alternatives industry and I’m excited to extend this to the veteran VC community,” said Jamie Kramer, Head of J.P. Morgan Asset Management’s Alternatives Solutions Group and the chair of the Project Spark Investment Committee. “Through our investments in funds managed by veteran-owned VC firms, we’re not only providing a capital commitment, but also seeking to create a network between the veteran community and the J.P. Morgan investment ecosystem.”

In 2011, JPMorgan Chase established its Office of Military and Veterans Affairs to promote veteran initiatives by weaving them into the fabric of how it conducts business. Focusing on careers, entrepreneurship and financial health, the firm supports veterans through both business-led initiatives like Project Spark, as well as philanthropic efforts and partnerships with top veteran service organizations around the world.

“This investment is a terrific example of how we are using the resources of our firm to lead the industry in creating access to venture capital for the veteran community,” said Mark Elliott, Global Head, Office of Military and Veterans Affairs, JPMorgan Chase. “When we leverage our partnerships across multiple lines of business and activate our global network, the economic opportunities we can create for the veteran community is so powerful.”

Another example of the firm’s commitment to veterans includes CEOcircle. In 2021, JPMorgan Chase Commercial Banking launched the year-long program for growth-stage businesses in partnership with Bunker Labs, a national nonprofit built by military veteran entrepreneurs with the mission of empowering other military veterans to become leaders in entrepreneurship and innovation. The program provides entrepreneurs with three key resources needed to help grow their businesses: targeted educational programming, peer-to-peer networking via monthly group meetings and financial expertise gleaned from a 10-week mentorship with JPMorgan Chase advisors.

For the 2021-2022 program, Bunker Labs and JPMorgan Chase worked with 40 businesses with 2021 projected annual revenue ranging from $1.5 to $105 million. The businesses, which averaged $13.9 million in annual revenue, represented a diverse array of industries including healthcare, marketing, data and information technology, staffing and recruitment and restaurants. The program is expected to double in size next year.

Source: JPMorgan Chase

The 1 in 60 Rule: How Remarkably Successful People Stay on Track to Accomplish Their Biggest Goals

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By Jeff Haden

On March 28, 1979, a sightseeing flight crashed into a mountain in Antarctica, killing all of the 279 people on board. An investigation determined that the crew had not been informed of a two-degree correction made to the plane’s flight path the night before, causing the plane’s navigation system to route them toward Mount Erebus instead of through McMurdo Sound.

Two degrees doesn’t sound like a lot, but in aviation terms, even one degree is huge.

That’s why pilots are taught the 1 in 60 rule, which states that after 60 miles, a one-degree error in heading will result in straying off course by one mile.

Which means the lake you planned to fly over could turn out to be a mountain.

Keep in mind the 1 in 60 rule isn’t just a navigation aid; it’s a mental framework designed to reinforce the importance of making constant course evaluations and corrections.

If you don’t, the farther you go, the more off course you end up.

Which makes the 1 in 60 rule a great mental framework for accomplishing your own goals.

The 1 in 60 Rule in Action

We all have dreams. The people who accomplish their dreams don’t just dream, though. They create processes. They build systems. They establish routines that keep them on track and ensure they reach their ultimate goal.

Oddly enough, they don’t obsess over their goals. They obsess over their processes because greatness results partly from inspiration but mostly from consistent, relentless effort.

And they stay on course because they constantly evaluate their progress and make smart corrections to their process.

Want to turn a dream into a reality? Follow this simple process.

  1. Start with an extremely specific goal.

The further off course you start, the further off course you’ll wind up. That’s why setting a specific goal is so important.

Say you want to get in better shape and be healthier. “Be healthier” sounds great, but it’s too vague. How will you know when you’re “in better shape,” much less, “healthier”?

“Lose 10 pounds in 30 days” is a specific, objective and most critically, measurable goal. You know exactly what you want to accomplish, which means you can create a process designed to get you there. You can create a solid diet plan. You can create an effective workout plan.

You can monitor your progress and make smart course corrections.

Or say you want to grow your business. “Increase revenue” sounds great but is too vague. “Land five new customers this month” is specific, objective and measurable. You know exactly what you want to accomplish, which means you can create a process designed to get you there.

Bottom line? You can’t set an accurate course until you know exactly where you want to go.

  1. Then, forget your goal.

Maintaining a laser-like focus on a goal is critical.

Or not.

One of the biggest reasons people give up on huge goals is the distance between here, where you are today, and there, where you someday hope to be. If you did only $10,000 in sales last month and your target is $1 million in sales per month, the distance between here and there seems insurmountable.

That’s one reason most incredibly successful people set a goal and then focus all their attention on creating and following a process designed to achieve that goal. The goal still exists, but their real focus is on what they do today.

And making sure they do it again tomorrow.

Because consistency matters: What you do every day is who you are.

And who you will become.

  1. Focus on your process. 

Health care providers are taught to check medications three times before delivering to patients. Not because the process itself is complex.

But because the consequence of error is so great.

The same is true for you; the consequence of “error,” in terms of time, effort, money, etc., when you don’t achieve a goal can be considerable. (And depressing: No matter how often you hear “fail fast, fail often,” failure still pretty much sucks.)

Pilots use the 1 in 60 rule to remind themselves to constantly monitor their progress and make quick course corrections.

You also know where you want to go. But you’ll never get there if you don’t regularly monitor and revise your plan based on your progress.

And if you don’t start out on the right path, remember, the 1 in 60 rule states that starting out, one degree off means winding up one mile off 60 miles later.

So don’t just correct your course along the way. Create and follow a process that is proved to work. Pick someone who has achieved something you want to achieve. Deconstruct his or her process.

Then follow it, and along the way, make small corrections as you learn what works best for you.

That way, when you travel your own version of 60 miles, you’ll arrive precisely where you hoped to be.

Jeff Haden is a keynote speaker, ghostwriter, LinkedIn Influencer, contributing editor to Inc., and the author of The Motivation Myth: How High Achievers Really Set Themselves Up to Win.

A Strategic Partnership Gets Veterans in Film Production

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Tyler Perry, winner of the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, poses in the press room during the Oscars

Since relocating to the former Fort McPherson Army base in Atlanta in 2015, Tyler Perry Studios has become an even-greater force in the entertainment and commercial production industry, promising enormous employment potential for military veterans in Georgia.

“Cooperation with this powerful studio at the center of Atlanta’s burgeoning place in motion picture, television and commercial production is huge for Vets2Set and provokes us to launch a major recruiting effort in the South,” reports David Cohen, president and co-founder of Vets2Set. “When employers enrolled in our organization search our database to staff a production, we want them to find production assistants matching their every need from Covid Compliance Officers to disciplined and well-trained veterans familiar with electronics, flying drones, driving trucks, security and construction, among other skills. The majority of our veterans live in New York and California, but the opportunities in the South are tremendous now thanks to Tyler Perry.”

Cohen hopes to recruit new candidates in the Atlanta area in part through cooperation with Vetlanta, an organization providing veterans with business networking services.

Chief Operating Officer of Tyler Perry Studios, Robert Boyd II and President of Original Programming, Angi Bones, spoke with Cohen to discuss how Vets2Set operates and within a few days, the studio was signed up and ready to hire.

Tyler Perry Studios occupies 330 acres in the city of Atlanta, offering 12 state-of-the-art sound studios and a large backlot with prepared sets for a baseball field, farmhouse, prison yard, bank and the White House, among others. Creative options are endless, and the opportunity for career development for veterans is extensive. Cooperation with Vets2Set is a logical extension of Tyler Perry’s commitments and successes as a writer, actor, producer, director and philanthropist. Tyler Perry Studios joins more than 200 other employers working with Vets2Set to launch military veterans in civilian careers in production. Other cooperating producers include Walt Disney Television, Warner Brothers, MLB Network, NBCUniversal, RSA Films, Shutterstock Studios and advertising agencies, including BBDO Atlanta.

When staffing a shoot, cooperating producers have access to the contact details and skills profiles of hundreds of military veterans around the country. The Vets2Set database can be searched by zip code, state, city and skills. Producers then hire military veterans to fill already budgeted positions the same way they would hire any other production assistants. The contact between employer and veteran is direct. As a not-for-profit organization, Vets2Set takes no fees for developing and promoting use of its database but rather runs entirely on volunteer labor and donations from corporate sponsors and private donors.

Military veterans and media employers can enroll in this veteran employment program at vets2set.org. For further information contact pbernabeo@vets2set.org.

Source: Vets2Set

From Military to the Workforce: Building Your Resume

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Resumes provide a historical snapshot of your experience, knowledge and skills. Recruiters should be able to review your resume and understand the work you have done, the length of your experience and your capabilities within a matter of minutes.

Resumes should encapsulate your experience as briefly as possible. Quantifying your experience can make them easier for recruiters to understand.

What’s in a resume? All good resumes include some standard information:

  • Contact information
  • Work experience
  • List of technical skills
  • Education
  • Job-related training
  • Languages
  • Affiliations
  • Professional publications
  • Honors and awards
  • Veterans’ preference
  • Level of clearance held

Contact Information

The first section of a cover letter should include your contact information, such as your name, address, preferred phone number and personal email address.

Work Experience

Your most recent experience should be listed first, and the rest of your experience should be listed in reverse chronological order. Experience typically includes the company or agency you worked for, the position you held, the dates you worked there and highlights of your responsibilities.

Unless you have not been working for very long, you have no reason to detail the jobs you held early in your career. Focus on your most recent and relevant positions.

Highlight any accomplishments or results of your work that will be relevant to the position, such as those that:

  • Required extra effort
  • You completed independently
  • Demonstrated expertise
  • Received recognition

These should emphasize results you produced, dollars generated or saved, percentage improvements in performance, the extent to which you exceeded goals in the past or organizational turnarounds you created.

List of Technical Skills

Technical skills can vary widely from methodologies to software or hardware. Technical skills do not often require explanation and can be listed by name; however, you must qualify your experience with each so that recruiters know your level of understanding of these skills. For example, a recruiter that is interested in process improvement will know about Six Sigma (a business management and process improvement methodology), so you will not have to explain it, but if you listed that, you should state what level belt you are and how long you have been practicing. The same rule applies to word processing and programming tools or hardware, such as servers.

Education

Your education information should only include pertinent facts such as:

  • Name of the institution where you earned your highest degree
  • City and state of the institution
  • Date you graduated or received the degree
  • Specific degree earned
  • Minors or double majors

If you attended college or a technical school but did not receive a degree, you should state how long you attended and your field of study. However, you must be clear that you did not receive a degree. If you did not attend college or a vocational school, you would include information about your high school education or GED. List your most recent degree first. If you are still enrolled in an institution, list it. Do not forget to include the anticipated date of graduation and the degree expected.

Job-Related Training

You have most likely received a significant amount of job-related training through the military. Provide details on the training and courses that you took throughout your career. List only the training that has enhanced your experience and skills, which will be of immense value in your new position. If the course title is not descriptive or is unfamiliar, summarize or briefly describe the course to potential resume evaluators. Don’t assume the resume evaluator will understand the terms in your resume. If there is any doubt, convey the meaning.

Languages

If you include languages on your resume, state your level of fluency (such as novice, intermediate or advanced). Do not overstate your level of proficiency. If your fluency is very limited, it is probably not worth listing the language.

Affiliations

Your professional affiliations can relate your past work and your current job profile if you are working in the same field. On a resume, they inform recruiters that you have a professional interest beyond your day-to-day job.

Emphasize current contributions and provide some details to explain your abilities within precise areas. It is recommended that you not include any political affiliations since hiring managers or an agency may fail to judge you enthusiastically. If you decide to include them anyway, be tactful in describing your involvement.

If you have a lot of affiliations on your resume, recruiters may view you as an overachiever. Consider including only the most relevant ones or splitting them into career-related and community-related categories.

Professional Publications

List your publications in reverse chronological order. Only list those publications that relate directly to your career goal or the position you are applying for. Potential employers may attempt to track down your publication, so make sure the titles and your authorship are verifiable before including them.

References

Be prepared to provide references if requested. References are typically people who can verify your employment and vouch for your performance. A potential employer always thinks that a provided resume is up-to-date. If your references are not up-to-date when the resume is reviewed, your out-of-date list may harm your credibility or frustrate your recruiter.

Honors and Awards

Awards can tell a potential employer that previous employers or other organizations valued your accomplishments. The fact that you or your team received formal recognition for your efforts is a good indicator of your skills and work ethic.

Additional Information

Any information that does not fit in the other resume subject areas but is worth highlighting for a recruiter because of its relevance to the position or because it helps you stand out as a qualified candidate can go in this catch-all area.

Source: VA for Vets

Success Takes Work

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Though achieving NVBDC Veteran Owned Business Certification requires some work, our process will clearly guide you through the various steps necessary to accomplish this task much faster than you could accomplish it on your own.

Our certification was designed to meet the highest corporate supplier diversity standards as practiced by the NMSDC (National Minority Supplier Diversity Council) and WBENC (Women Business Enterprise National Council). As we have been telling the applicants, “It is not enough that you’re a Veteran; you have to show up and run the company,” says Keith King, Founder and CEO. In the supplier diversity language, “showing up” translates to “operational control and authority.”

No corporation that we know accepts self-certification of a minority- or woman-owned business. Why would they do it with Veterans? Why would a Veteran even expect that they don’t have to prove their status? The NVBDC does not accept DD214s from the applicant. The applicant must request that their DD214 military records be sent directly to the NVBDC. The DD214 takes a highly-trained person to read and determine if that person meets the various statutory and regulatory legislation standards to be called a Veteran.

With over $2 billion in contracts awarded to NVBDC service-disabled and Veteran-owned businesses per year since 2017, it is difficult to just feature one company.

HOWEVER, HERE ARE A FEW SAMPLES OF WHAT OUR VETERANS WRITE US:

ATLANTA, March 31, 2022 — Digital Marketing Agency Joseph Studios Passes Rigorous Veteran Certification. The organic marketing firm is proud to be successfully vetted by the National Veteran Business Development Council (NVBDC).

After a rigorous process, Joseph Studios — Atlanta’s leading digital marketing firm — was awarded an official certification from the National Veteran Business Development Council (NVBDC) as a Veteran-Owned Small Business (VOB). The accreditation reassures other brands and VOBs that Joseph Studios is a reliable ally and validates our position as a VOB.

“Like our clients, we want to provide a brighter future for our community,” said Daniel Klein, IRR Army Captain (O3) and CEO of Joseph Studios. “By displaying that our business is Veteran-owned, we can assure our clients of our commitment to outstanding service while opening doors for other Veterans looking to transition into civilian life.” With their commitment to empowerment and social responsibility, all while providing the highest standard of service, Joseph Studios is proud to be officially certified as an NVBDC Veteran-Owned Business.

NVBDC Creates Win-Win Relationships:
The NVBDC system Keith and his team have in place, the relationships they cultivate, the tools they share and the knowledge you gain as a member works! The NVBDC member corporations want to work with Vets. They spend the money to be able to hire Vets, and when you put the work in – you get work. This month we received a master’s Service Agreement from JLL for J.P. Morgan Chase and an RFI from Pfizer. Sending a big thank you to the NVBDC Team!”

John J. Piekarski, U. S. Navy Veteran & President | ALLY Construction Services

JOE PAMELIA COLLECTIONS

I just wanted to let you know WE ARE A WALMART SUPPLIER AS OF YESTERDAY!! Excited, scared, overwhelmed but very proud of all of us. Just went live on Walmart Marketplace in the U.S. and soon to be on Walmart Globally. Soon to be on Amazon.com U.S. and then Amazon Globally.

Joe Pamelia, CEO | Joe Pamelia Collections

For more samples of what your fellow Veterans have to say about being NVBDC certified go to: nvbdc.org/certified-success-working-it.

To date, NVBDC has the support of over 140 corporations of all sizes helping NVBDC Certified Veteran Businesses with access and opportunities to become a part of their supply chain. Tier 1 Suppliers are being evaluated and held accountable to capture and report their Veteran spend as part of the process. NVBDC Certified Service-Disabled and Veteran-Owned Businesses (SD/VOBs) are gaining the advantage with new markets and new opportunities that will open a massive new range of potential business through our NVBDC Corporate Members.

NVBDC regularly receives direct requests from our corporate members regarding their current opportunities. We provide the detailed capability information from our NVBDC-certified SD/VOBs that match these corporate procurement opportunities. This alerts the SD/VOBs that their information has been shared with our corporate members.

“The NVBDC views entrepreneurship as another form of employment and believes that helping our Veterans succeed in business helps them, their families and the communities in which they reside,” said NVBDC founder and CEO Keith King.

We are excited to announce that NVBDC has signed a Strategic Alliance Memorandum with the SBA (Small Business Administration). The United States Small Business Administration and the National Veteran Business Development Council are joining together to uphold a common mission: to help start, maintain and expand Veteran businesses. The two organizations will work together in the spirit of cooperation and open communications, with the primary goal of meeting the needs of the Veteran business community.

For more information and to learn how to become an NVBDC Certified SD/VOB please feel free to reach out to NVBDC by visiting our website: nvbdc.org or contacting us directly: (888) CERTIFIED.

The National Veteran Business Development Council (NVBDC) is a non-profit organization providing nationally recognized certification, training, networking and advocacy for Veteran small business entrepreneurs in the federal and commercial market. NVBDC’s goal is to ensure Veterans are procurement ready and have enhanced access to opportunities to start, operate, sustain and grow competitive and strong businesses serving Federal agencies and other corporate contractors. NVBDC will continue to fight to eliminate Veteran business “ineligible contracts.” NVBDC continues to work with the SBA to support Veteran businesses with opportunities made directly to them, for them!

Source: NVBDC

NASM Supports Military Families with Career Opportunities

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By Chris Billingsley

NASM (National Academy of Sports Medicine), a global leader in fitness education and certifications, supports military families – not only on days like the annual – Military Spouse Appreciation Day – but every day by providing 30% off all courses for military members and their families, as well as a free course on mental toughness.

Since 2017, NASM has been recognized as a Military Friendly School, and its Certified Personal Training (CPT) program is also eligible for military funding reimbursement.

Not only do NASM courses offer invaluable health knowledge, for military members and their spouses, NASM also offers flexible career opportunities perfect for a military family’s lifestyle, which can often include multiple moves and makes working in a traditional environment difficult.

Working as a NASM certified personal trainer, wellness coach, or nutrition coach offers the freedom to work wherever and whenever works best for your family, while offering the purpose and satisfaction that comes from helping others achieve their goals.

In fact, for those that want to coach virtually, now is the best time to get started. NASM is seeing a 23% uptick in graduates who are offering virtual services since 2017, with the online fitness industry projected to grow from $16.15 billion this year to $79.87 billion in 2026.

Military spouses looking for career opportunities can also apply MyCAA scholarship funding to specific programs, including a Group Fitness Instructor certification through AFAA (Athletics and Fitness Association of America).

Learners have many options for their course of study – whether they’re interested in offering clients nutritional support, fitness knowledge, or comprehensive wellness coaching. NASM even offers bundles of courses as well as specializations, such as virtual coaching, to help students create the best program for their career goals.

For more information on how NASM supports military members and their families, visit www.nasm.org/certified-personal-trainer/military-support.

Wells Fargo Launches Military Spouse Hiring Program, Designed to Onboard 100 New Employees Per Year for the Next Five Years

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By Yahoo! Finance

Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) recently announced its Military Spouse Homefront Heroes Hiring program, offering mid- to high-level remote, hybrid, and in-office career opportunities with a focus on portability for spouses of those actively serving. The new program is designed to onboard 100 new employees each year for the next five years.

Wells Fargo’s Military Spouse Homefront Heroes Hiring (HHH) program is now accepting interested candidates into its talent community in preparation for launching 100 open positions in early June 2022. The HHH program team will help prepare candidates and hiring managers for a virtual hiring event, assisting with resume development and interview training to help applicants articulate transferrable skills and potential employment gaps. The virtual hiring event will occur in August 2022, with a program start date of Sept. 12, 2022.

The announcement came in advance of Military Spouse Appreciation Day on Friday, May 6.

“The 24% unemployment rate for military spouses far exceeds the national average; this is largely a result of permanent change of station and the inability to have a portable career,” said Sean Passmore, head of Military Talent Strategic Sourcing and Enterprise Military & Veteran Initiatives at Wells Fargo. “There is no one-size-fits-all solution to military spouse un- or underemployment. The scale and complexity of HHH demonstrate our understanding of the unique career challenges faced by military spouses, and our commitment to helping solve the problem.”

Positions will be available in Human Resources, Consumer & Small Business Banking, Technology, Wealth & Investment Management, and Consumer Lending. Each line of business will host 20 roles, and new hires will begin the inaugural program on Sept. 12, 2022.

HHH is just one of several programs Wells Fargo has implemented to serve and employ the military community. Others include:

The Veteran Employment Transition (VET) Program: A nationwide, competitively paid 8+ week Spring and Fall internship for experienced talent that converts directly to a full-time role based on performance. Interns develop an understanding of the daily responsibilities of a full-time Wells Fargo employee, while networking and participating in special training opportunities.

Military Apprenticeships: A Department of Labor structured experiential training program that results in skills certification for applicants who do not initially meet qualifications for the non-apprentice equivalent role.

Boots to Banking: A Wells Fargo one-of-a-kind program designed to attract, prepare, and hire military talent into various career opportunities through military-specific hiring events. Pre- and post-event components include candidate and hiring manager preparation along with valuable resources for a successful transition.

Corporate Fellowship Program: In partnership with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Hiring Our Heroes Initiative, the program hosts military personnel within six months of separation for a 12-week fellowship experience to achieve full-time employment.

Applicants interested in joining the HHH talent community should visit the Military Spouse Homefront Heroes Hiring Program website.

Click here to read the full article on Yahoo! Finance.

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Upcoming Events

  1. City Career Fair
    January 19, 2022 - November 4, 2022
  2. The Small Business Expo–Multiple Event Dates
    February 17, 2022 - December 1, 2022
  3. Multiple Hire GI Hiring Events During June-December!
    June 21, 2022 - December 8, 2022
  4. REBOOT WORKSHOP – VIRTUAL
    September 12, 2022 @ 8:00 am - January 20, 2023 @ 5:00 pm
  5. Americas Warrior Partnership 9th Annual Symposium
    October 4, 2022 - October 6, 2022