Best Jobs For Veterans 2018

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Best Jobs for Veterans

Eight of the best civilian jobs for transitioning veterans have been identified by one of the top job search sites, CareerCast. These include registered nurse, financial advisor, info security analyst and operations research assistant, among others.

“There are many benefits to hiring veterans,” says Kyle Kensing, online content editor, CareerCast. “The discipline, teamwork and leadership qualities emphasized in the military directly translate to the civilian workforce. Skills gained during military service are in high demand.”

Public and private sector efforts to recruit and employ veterans have paid major dividends in lowering the unemployment rate for veterans. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported in 2016 that of the approximately 21.2 million men and women with military experience, an unemployment rate that hovered near 10 percent just seven years ago has been cut almost in half.

The Veterans Opportunity to Work Act was designed for the Department of Labor to match veterans with career paths based on their responsibilities while in service. Private-sector companies are also launching their own hiring initiatives to match veteran job seekers with open positions.

Growing emphasis on technological skills in the military translate well to a growing market for IT professionals. Information Security is an area of growing importance in both military and government matters. Veterans who work specifically in IT security during their service can effectively translate their skills into government positions of the same nature.

Another area of emphasis in military service is healthcare. Nursing positions are also in demand for enlisted personnel, and many states allow veterans with experience as nurses in the military to apply that experience to civilian certification.

For those veterans looking to use their civilian careers to make a positive impact for others in the military, careers in management and finance offer great opportunities. Businesses tailoring their outreach to the veteran community are increasingly turning to veterans for management consultant and operations research analyst positions.
Financial advisor is the No. 1 most in-demand field in the CareerCast Veteran Network job database. Veterans with a background in mathematics and finance can work directly with military families to help them protect their investments and savings.

The improved employment landscape for veterans isn’t merely a boon to one section of the workforce. Veterans bring skills that greatly benefit employers, making them prime candidates in a variety of fields.

Here are eight of the best jobs for veterans:

Profession Annual Median Salary* Growth Outlook*
Financial advisor $89,160 30%
Information security analyst $90,120 18%
Management consultant $81,320 14%
Nurse practitioner $104,740 31%
Operations research analyst $78,630 30%
Registered nurse $67,490 16%
Sales manager $113,860 5%
Software engineer $100,690 17%

The best jobs for veterans were selected from the 200 professions covered in the Jobs Rated report as a good match based on their responsibilities and skills gained while in service.

Wages and projected growth outlooks through 2024 are from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
To read the full report, visit veteran.careercast.com/jobs-rated
Source: veteran.careercast.com/jobs-veterans

NASM Supports Military Families with Career Opportunities

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Young military couple kissing each other, homecoming

By Chris Billingsley

NASM (National Academy of Sports Medicine), a global leader in fitness education and certifications, supports military families – not only on days like the annual – Military Spouse Appreciation Day – but every day by providing 30% off all courses for military members and their families, as well as a free course on mental toughness.

Since 2017, NASM has been recognized as a Military Friendly School, and its Certified Personal Training (CPT) program is also eligible for military funding reimbursement.

Not only do NASM courses offer invaluable health knowledge, for military members and their spouses, NASM also offers flexible career opportunities perfect for a military family’s lifestyle, which can often include multiple moves and makes working in a traditional environment difficult.

Working as a NASM certified personal trainer, wellness coach, or nutrition coach offers the freedom to work wherever and whenever works best for your family, while offering the purpose and satisfaction that comes from helping others achieve their goals.

In fact, for those that want to coach virtually, now is the best time to get started. NASM is seeing a 23% uptick in graduates who are offering virtual services since 2017, with the online fitness industry projected to grow from $16.15 billion this year to $79.87 billion in 2026.

Military spouses looking for career opportunities can also apply MyCAA scholarship funding to specific programs, including a Group Fitness Instructor certification through AFAA (Athletics and Fitness Association of America).

Learners have many options for their course of study – whether they’re interested in offering clients nutritional support, fitness knowledge, or comprehensive wellness coaching. NASM even offers bundles of courses as well as specializations, such as virtual coaching, to help students create the best program for their career goals.

For more information on how NASM supports military members and their families, visit www.nasm.org/certified-personal-trainer/military-support.

Wells Fargo Launches Military Spouse Hiring Program, Designed to Onboard 100 New Employees Per Year for the Next Five Years

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By Yahoo! Finance

Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) recently announced its Military Spouse Homefront Heroes Hiring program, offering mid- to high-level remote, hybrid, and in-office career opportunities with a focus on portability for spouses of those actively serving. The new program is designed to onboard 100 new employees each year for the next five years.

Wells Fargo’s Military Spouse Homefront Heroes Hiring (HHH) program is now accepting interested candidates into its talent community in preparation for launching 100 open positions in early June 2022. The HHH program team will help prepare candidates and hiring managers for a virtual hiring event, assisting with resume development and interview training to help applicants articulate transferrable skills and potential employment gaps. The virtual hiring event will occur in August 2022, with a program start date of Sept. 12, 2022.

The announcement came in advance of Military Spouse Appreciation Day on Friday, May 6.

“The 24% unemployment rate for military spouses far exceeds the national average; this is largely a result of permanent change of station and the inability to have a portable career,” said Sean Passmore, head of Military Talent Strategic Sourcing and Enterprise Military & Veteran Initiatives at Wells Fargo. “There is no one-size-fits-all solution to military spouse un- or underemployment. The scale and complexity of HHH demonstrate our understanding of the unique career challenges faced by military spouses, and our commitment to helping solve the problem.”

Positions will be available in Human Resources, Consumer & Small Business Banking, Technology, Wealth & Investment Management, and Consumer Lending. Each line of business will host 20 roles, and new hires will begin the inaugural program on Sept. 12, 2022.

HHH is just one of several programs Wells Fargo has implemented to serve and employ the military community. Others include:

The Veteran Employment Transition (VET) Program: A nationwide, competitively paid 8+ week Spring and Fall internship for experienced talent that converts directly to a full-time role based on performance. Interns develop an understanding of the daily responsibilities of a full-time Wells Fargo employee, while networking and participating in special training opportunities.

Military Apprenticeships: A Department of Labor structured experiential training program that results in skills certification for applicants who do not initially meet qualifications for the non-apprentice equivalent role.

Boots to Banking: A Wells Fargo one-of-a-kind program designed to attract, prepare, and hire military talent into various career opportunities through military-specific hiring events. Pre- and post-event components include candidate and hiring manager preparation along with valuable resources for a successful transition.

Corporate Fellowship Program: In partnership with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Hiring Our Heroes Initiative, the program hosts military personnel within six months of separation for a 12-week fellowship experience to achieve full-time employment.

Applicants interested in joining the HHH talent community should visit the Military Spouse Homefront Heroes Hiring Program website.

Click here to read the full article on Yahoo! Finance.

Naval Base San Diego Hybrid Career Fair!

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Man holding a Job Fair sign

The Naval Base San Diego Hybrid Career Fair is coming to San Diego’s Scottish Rite Event Center, May 12, 2022.

FREE ADMISSION: Open to ALL branches of service active duty, reservists, veterans, family members and DoD employees.

May 12, 2022 @ 11:00 am – 1:00pm

We love helping our veterans to find employment opportunities after transitioning from the military, as well as their spouses.

You are invited to attend our upcoming career fair, attendance is free!

This is your chance to meet directly with hiring managers looking to HIRE Vets!

REQUIRED:

1. MUST Have Base Access

2. MUST WEAR MASK and Temperature Check before the event. Safety measures will be forced.

Event highlights

• Opportunity to meet face-to-face with local and national employers

• Onsite Interviews

• Network with key community resource providers

• Learn about military family benefits and more!

• Dress for success & bring plenty of resumes!

Title Sponsor: Honeywellhttps://careers.honeywell.com/us/en

Register Now And Also Get The Hybrid Details: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/naval-base-san-diego-hybrid-career-fair-sponsored-by-honeywell-tickets-180341154247

Check Out Our Job Board For Your Military Transition

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man wearing a military uniform on left and a suit on the right

Search for employment opportunities and connect with companies that are looking to hire veterans!

Before you start, some things to keep in mind:

Build Your Resume

The goal of a resume is to effectively summarize and highlight your qualifications in a way that will make the employer want to reach out and schedule an interview with you. These tips will help you build a resume that will stand out.

  • Collect your assets. Get a copy of your Verification of Military Experience and Training through the Department of Defense. The VMET document helps you prepare resumes and job applications quickly when you separate from service. Include essential components like contact information, job objective, summary of qualifications, employment history, education and training, and special skills.
  • Tailor your resume for the job. Translate everything into civilian terms and include volunteer experience.
  • Write a cover letter. Get the name of the person in charge of hiring, keep it to one page and always follow up.
  • Tap into resume-building tools. Check out Veterans.gov and VA.gov.

Find the Right Civilian Career

Your military experience is valuable to many employers, but it’s up to you to get out there and sell it. Start with these tips:

  • Get in touch with friends and fellow veterans. Organize your contacts and connections.
  • Tap into the services of your transition assistance offices. Get referrals for employment agencies and recruiters, job leads and career counseling.

And besides our job board, take advantage of the many job fairs, of which many are virtual:

Hiring Our Heroes career events for transitioning service members, veterans and military spouses.

DAV Job Fairs

American Legion Job Fairs

Recruit Military Job Fairs

  • Look for veteran-friendly companies. Many organizations are committed to helping veterans find a good job. Look for programs such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Hiring Our Heroes initiative. Check out organizations like Soldier for Life, Marine for Life, the Military Officers Association of American, Non-Commissioned Officers Association or Enlisted Association, and United Service Organizations. Also, see the HIRE Vets Medallion Award for a list of organizations committed to veteran hiring, retention and professional development.

Get started with your job search today!

How to recruit and retain veteran employees

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black female soldier working on a laptop

Military veterans make outstanding employees who hold skills and assets that transfer over to any workspace. The question is, how can you not only attract veteran employees to your business but encourage them to stay in their position.

Consider these four simple yet effective steps:

Use Military Networks

Sometimes, posting a generic job post to a popular job search website isn’t enough to attract the veteran candidates that would be right for your company.

Utilize veteran networks, career fairs, and spaces to attract and educate yourself on how to best employ veteran candidates.

Employers can utilize an abundance of resources and organizations to help them get started on their journey.
 

Some helpful organizations include:

  • The American Legion
  • American Job Center
  • National Labor Exchange
  • Rallypoint.com
  • Indeed.com (special paid features)
  • Hiring our Heroes

Many of these organizations additionally include information on attending veteran career fairs where you can speak to potential employees in person and discover what their assets, needs, and skillsets are. The more veteran connections you make, the more likely you will find candidates or references that you can utilize in your workspace.

Meet their Standards

Veterans are extremely loyal to an organization. What is good for your veteran population is also good for any employee. However, if the environment does not meet veterans’ needs, they tend to leave an organization quicker than their non-veteran counterparts. Veterans are often interested in:

  • A challenging/engaging opportunity.
  • Clearly stated expectations of the position.
  • A known pathway for advancement in the current position and organization.
  • A mentor (preferably a veteran) on arrival and an onboarding program to ease integration and adjustment to the organization’s culture.
  • Clear and open verbal and written communication — veterans are accustomed to in-person communication from leadership.
  • Career professional development.
  • Impact on the organization — veterans want to know what they are doing has “meaning.”
  • Compensation and benefits.

Transitioning from the field to the workplace can be difficult for any military veteran. Remember to be patient, considerate, and empathetic to the needs and experiences of your veteran employees.

Know the Lingo

Many veterans have the experience you are looking for in an employee; however, it may translate differently when their specific skill set is written on paper. For example, if you are looking for a Marketing Manager, you’re not likely to find a military veteran who holds that exact title on their resume. However, titles such as an Enlisted Accessions Recruiter, Psychological Operations Specialist or Recruiter are all positions that a veteran could have held and learned the same experience. Utilizing the translators found on websites such as careerstop.org can help you find the military job titles that match your civilian job needs.

Provide Specialty Resources

Providing a space where veterans can have extra support in their transition is one of the most valuable things you can do not only to attract but keep your veteran employees. Providing on-site training, creating veteran affinities and ERGs, establishing veteran mentorship programs, and ensuring that your leadership team is educated to the needs of your veteran employees are all added resources that will ease the anxieties of military transition. The more comfortable and supported you can make veteran employees feel, the stronger your employees and team can become.

Every veteran will have different experiences and difficulties in the workplace, but ensuring that you provide a safe, supportive environment is one of the best things you can do to attract and retain veterans.

Source: Department of Labor, Berkshire Associate, CareerOneSt

What Makes a Résumé Great? Science, and a Résumé Expert, Has the Answer

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Human resource manager looking at many different cv resume and choosing perfect person to hire. HR concept on virtual screen.

By Jeff Haden

As the old saying goes, you can’t win a race in the first lap, but you can definitely lose one. The same is true with résumés: Even the greatest résumé won’t, on its own, cause you to hire someone — but a relatively poor résumé will almost always get tossed into the “no” pile.

Fair or unfair, that’s the reality.

And also, the problem, because whom you decide (and, just as important, don’t decide) to interview helps determine whom you hire — and as a result, determines the skills, talent, and expertise of the people around you.

So, if it all starts with a résumé, how do you define a “good” résumé? Or better yet, a “great” résumé?

Science can partly answer the question. In 2016, researchers at the University of Michigan conducted a study “systematically examining the impression management (IM) content of actual résumés and cover letters and empirically testing the effect on applicant evaluation.”

Or, in non-researcher-speak, tried to figure out what does and doesn’t work when it comes to crafting a résumé that lands a job interview.

In general terms, a little self-promotion (think a few superlatives like “excellent” and “outstanding”) is good; a lot is not. So is a little ingratiation (think “I would love to be a part of such an awesome team” or “I would love to contribute to such a worthwhile mission”); a lot is not. As with most things, moderation is key.

Helpful, but only to a point. While what a candidate has done is interesting, what you care about most is what the person you hire can do.

And to determine that, you also need a story.

According to Brian Brandt, a certified professional résumé writer who specializes in crafting résumés for people seeking finance, technology, logistics, biotech, and pharmaceutical positions, “A résumé should be built from the candidate’s journey but pointed to his or her future. A résumé that scrolls the past is a document that elicits the wrong kinds of questions.” (More on that in a moment.) “The best résumés show the capacity to go where the candidate wants to go.”

Which, if you craft your job postings properly, will align with what you need the employee you hire to accomplish.

According to the University of Michigan research, what you ask for in a job posting is largely what you will get. Use lots of superlatives in your job postings, and most candidates will respond with lots of superlatives. Talk a lot about mission and purpose and culture, and you’ll get plenty of ingratiation.

The better approach? Imagine you’re looking for a person who has accomplished specific things; a great résumé — and great candidate — describes what the candidate has done and tells a story that indicates their development and growth supports what you need them to actually do.

“The best résumés are never just reflections of accomplishments and achievements,” Brian says. “They’re well-curated documents that move the conversation to second- and third- interview turf.”

And that’s where the “questions” issue comes into play. Some résumés spark the wrong kinds of questions: “Does the candidate possess the right attributes?” “Does the candidate have the right experience?” “Does the candidate possess the work ethic, interpersonal skills, and cultural fit?” Those questions indicate doubt.

The right questions? “That’s amazing; how did she do that?” “That was an interesting career move; I wonder why he shifted to a different functional role?” “Most operations managers didn’t spend their college summers working on archaeology digs; I wonder how that all ties together?”

According to Brian, those are the kinds of stories a great résumé tells.

Because they answer the questions you most need answered — and will want to ask more about during job interviews. Whether the candidate’s actual accomplishments show they are capable of achieving what you need them to achieve. Whether the candidate displays values similar to those your organization embraces.

Whether the candidate displays the tangible and less tangible skills, attributes, and qualities you need most.

A great résumé provides the initial answers; job interviews provide the deeper, more substantive answers.

So, what should you look for in a résumé? According to Brian, a great résumé tells a story that doesn’t make you ask whether the candidate might be able do the job.

A great résumé leaves you wanting to know not whether, but just how well, the candidate will do the job.

If you don’t find yourself wondering that…then it’s not a great résumé.

The Benefits of Hiring Veterans

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black professional male smiling, giving the thumbs up sign

Numerous positive outcomes result from military service. As an employer, you can benefit from the training and experience a veteran brings to the workforce.

Military personnel and veterans have been vetted by their training. All members of the military complete basic training, which is designed to “break an individual down” and then train them back up. Basic training varies by branch but includes intense physical training, academic and skills training, and socialization into that branch’s culture. When you hire a veteran or member of the military, the training you supply is built on top of a foundation that has already been set in the military. Military service instills strong values, selfless service, and loyalty — desirable attributes in an employee.

Military service results in the acquisition of numerous skills, training, and experiences that would benefit any company or agency.

Veterans in the General Workplace:

No matter the position, veterans are equipped with an array of strengths that translate into any job space, including:

  • Working well in a team. Teamwork is considered an essential part of daily life and is the foundation on which safe military operations are built.
  • Having a sense of duty. Responsibility for job performance and accountability for completing missions are something to take pride in.
  • Experiencing self-confidence. Holding a realistic estimation of self and ability based on experiences is expected of each service member.
  • Being organized and disciplined.
  • Possessing a strong work ethic. In the military, the mission always comes first.
  • Having the ability to follow through on assignments, even under difficult or stressful circumstances.
  • Possessing a variety of cross-functional skills, such as extensive training on computer programs and systems, interacting with various people with different skills to accomplish a task, and coordinating and troubleshooting problems in novel and known conditions.
  • Being able to problem solve quickly and creatively.
  • The ability to adapt to changing situations.
  • Naturally following rules and schedules.

Veterans Make Strong Leaders

Military service teaches and cultivates leadership skills that translate smoothly into the roles of supervisor, manager, and other “high up” positions. These skills include:

  • Taking responsibility for self and actions
  • Making sound and timely decisions
  • Setting the example
  • Understanding and accomplishing assigned tasks
  • Being dependable
  • Cultivating abilities to meet a variety of challenges
  • Being disciplined

Veterans are Educated

After completing their service, veterans have easier access to educational and training resources. This means that in tandem with their hands-on experience in the military, they are typically more educated in their craft. These skillsets often manifest as:

  • Technical and tactical proficiency in a variety of skills
  • Technical education for a specific military occupational specialty

Veterans are Mature

Military service can result in personal growth and positive emotional experiences that foster a sense of respect and maturity that might not be seen otherwise. Veterans often exhibit:

  • Enhanced maturity
  • Self-improvement
  • Knowing oneself better (e.g., strengths, capabilities, areas for improvement)
  • Strengthening of resilience
  • Positive transformations following trauma or situations of extreme stress
  • Improved coping skills
  • Pride (e.g., in self, unit)

Veterans Understand the Importance of a Team

Veterans are taught the importance of interpersonal skills and relationships in professional and personal settings. They are often more knowledgeable about working productively on a team with different opinions, personalities, and behaviors than those without military experience. Veterans are especially good at:

  • Creating camaraderie and deep friendships
  • Interpersonal maturation
  • Working well in teams and understanding the importance of cooperation
  • Looking out for the welfare of the team

Hiring a veteran will not only allow you to gain employees who are dedicated, lead naturally, develop an array of job skills, but are some of the greatest assets your company can have to better your company.

Source: VA.gov

Diversity in the Healthcare Industry, at Every Step

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Abbott and Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) recently announced a $37.5 million initiative to empower diverse small businesses to help create a more diverse healthcare supply chain. The initiative will provide diverse small-business owners with the tailored solutions, support and resources they need to grow, compete and create jobs – enabling greater diversity in healthcare and a more inclusive supply chain for Abbott and other healthcare companies.

This work advances Abbott and LISC’s shared commitment to create a more diverse healthcare industry and generate jobs and stronger economies in underinvested communities.

This funding opportunity is open to qualified diverse small businesses and offers support through:

  • Growth capital: interest-free capital to help businesses overcome hurdles to expansion, such as investing in management systems to comply with regulatory and environmental requirements
  • Business loans: flexible, affordable loans that would not typically be available through conventional lenders
  • Tailored coaching and technical assistance: targeted, customized support, including help with fulfilling investment and loan requirements and identifying and addressing specific business challenges

Eligible diverse small businesses for program participation and funding must be:

  • Diverse-owned, defined as those that are majority owned by people of color (including Black, Latino, Asian and Native Americans), women, veterans, people with disabilities, people who identify as LGBTQ, and other historically underrepresented groups;
  • In business for more than two years and are based in the U.S. with an annual revenue of $250,000 or more; and
  • Focused on manufacturing nutrition, diagnostics, medical devices or other health technologies, or offering business-to-business products and services that the healthcare industry can use.
  • Sole proprietors are not eligible for the program.

For more information about this initiative, please visit the LISC site. And to learn more about Abbott’s work to support a more diverse supply chain, visit Abbott’s site.

Plans for the World’s Tallest Flagpole and Most Comprehensive Veterans Memorial to be Unveiled in Maine

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Flagpole of Freedom logo

The Park will create thousands of jobs and catalyze year-round economic opportunity

WHAT: Born from a desire to advance unity and patriotism in America, the founder of Wreaths Across America, Morrill Worcester, will unveil Flagpole of Freedom Park – an apolitical project 12 years in the making.

This Park will become the only place in the country to honor all 24 million American veterans in one location.

Standing taller than the Empire State Building, the Park will fly the world’s largest American flag from the tallest flagpole in the world, symbolizing the commitment and sacrifice veterans make to protect America’s freedom.

The Park will humanize key milestones that have shaped American history and will feature immersive educational experiences and living history museums. Phase 1 will open on July 4, 2026 – America’s 250th birthday.

Located in Columbia Falls, the large-scale project will catalyze economic development for the State of Maine, creating an estimated 8,000+ year-round jobs and $27M in tax revenue.

WHEN: Tuesday, March 29, 2022 11:00 a.m. Eastern

WHERE: Livestream link

WHO:

  • Morrill Worcester, Founder & Chairman of the Board, Flagpole of Freedom
  • Senator Marianne Moore (R), Washington County Maine
  • Chris Gardner, Washington County Commissioner
  • Tony Santiago, Chair, Columbia Falls Select Board
  • Tim Gatz, Maine Tourism Alliance
  • Maine State Chamber of Commerce
  • Tricia Thurston, American Legion, Department of Maine

DETAILS: Flagpole of Freedom Park: https://www.flagpoleoffreedom.com/launch/

5 of the Best Traits for Improved Leadership

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If you were to ask one hundred different people what the best leadership qualities were, you are more than likely to get an abundance of different answers.

While some people think leadership thrives off of authority and determination; others might look to compassion and humility as more admirable traits. But when you’re getting ready to put yourself into the mindset of being an effective leader, you have to remember what it was like to be the employee. What was always the most helpful to you when you needed your boss, coach or mentor? What did you wish they would have done in your time of need?

Here are some traits you should always be building upon to be the best leader you can be:

Confidence

In any setting where you are working towards a goal, people want to know that their leaders are confident in their decisions and know what is best for the group. Whether it be large scale projects or implementing smaller strategies to gauge success, have confidence in every decision you make and ensure your decisions are worthy of that confidence. If you don’t think an idea will work or that you have the ability to lead your team, your employees will be even less inclined to believe in the idea. You set the tone for the ins and outs of the company’s responsibilities, so make sure you are confident in your abilities and in your team.

Adaptability

Sometimes plans don’t go in the way you hoped due to unforeseen or unpredictable circumstances. This is just a part of life whether in the field or in your personal life. Instead of acting out of fear or impulse, take a breath, open your mind and decide how you’ll take the next steps. The workplace is always changing, stay on top of the trends to make sure you’re prepared when things don’t go quite your way. Your team is looking to you for guidance in times like these and being calm and thinking fast is of the upmost importance.

Personable

Being personable doesn’t mean being your employee’s best friend, but it does mean being approachable and understanding. It can be easy to get in a power-backed mindset where you forget what it’s like to be an employee yourself. Remember that you are not just your team’s boss, but their fellow co-worker, and you should create a professional, yet personable relationship to foster trust. What does their job entail? How can you help their efficiency? What do your employees enjoy doing once they clock out? When employees are able to trust their boss, they will feel comfortable providing feedback, being honest in all aspects and informing you of accidental errors in the workplace.

Open-Minded

Culture is defined by its ever-changing nature, which means the way that “things used to be done” will be likely to change. This doesn’t mean that one way is necessarily better than the other, it’s just a different approach than what you might be used to. Keep an open-mind to change and consider other viewpoints as being alternatives to the norm rather than challenges, and even if an idea appears to be blatantly incorrect or difficult to understand, try to put yourself in the other person’s shoes. Why do they want to go with this specific ideal? Why are they passionate about this belief? What is their point of view?

Communication

This may sound cliché, but communication is critical to the workplace in all aspects and can always be improved upon. For leaders specifically, it’s important to relay what your expectations and goals in a way that is clearly understood. Miscommunication is bound to happen at least once, but use the mistake as an opportunity to improve upon how this mistake can be avoided in the future. In the same way relaying your needs is important, it’s also important to listen attentively when your employees come to you for updates on projects or to communicate their own needs or concerns. The ability to give and receive information will decrease opportunities for misunderstandings, simple mistakes and frustration on both sides.

Becoming an effective, respected leader in the workplace can seem daunting or even overwhelming, but you are never alone and can always learn from your mistakes. No one becomes great at something overnight, so remember to stay respectful to others and the rest will fall into place.

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    January 19, 2022 - November 4, 2022
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