U.S. Air Force’s Heritage Flight to perform flyover for Super Bowl LII

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Heritage Flight

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Air Force Heritage Flight is scheduled to perform the flyover at the start of Super Bowl LII in Minneapolis, Minnesota, February 4.

The Heritage Flight will consist of one F-16 Fighting Falcon, two A-10 Thunderbolt IIs and one P-51 Mustang flying in formation over U.S. Bank Stadium. This is the first time the Heritage Flight team will conduct a flyover for a Super Bowl, and it will be broadcast live on NBC and in U.S. Bank Stadium from multiple vantage points, including an in-flight perspective from a camera mounted on the P-51 Mustang.

The United States Air Force Heritage Flight Program presents the evolution of United States Air Force air power by flying today’s state-of-the-art fighter aircraft in close formation with vintage aircraft, dramatically displays Air Force history, and proudly supports our Air Force’s recruiting and retention efforts. As part of the Heritage Flight program, the Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation honors the sacrifices of those who have served or are currently serving in the Air Force through participation in these flight displays.

The teams representing the Air Force in the Heritage Flight for Super Bowl LII are the F-16 Viper Demonstration Team from Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, the A-10 Thunderbolt Demonstration Team from Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona and a vintage P-51 Mustang flown by pilot Steve Hinton from the Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation, California founded by chairman Dan Friedkin.

FATHER SOLDIER SON—WATCH THE TRAILER!

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FATHER SOLDIER SON promo poster featuring three side views of a child, teen and father in uniform

Duty. Country. Family. From The New York Times comes a documentary 10 years in the making. FATHER SOLDIER SON releases globally on Netflix this month.

This intimate documentary from The New York Times follows a former platoon sergeant and his two young sons over almost a decade, chronicling his return home after a serious combat injury in Afghanistan.

Originating as part of a 2010 project on a battalion’s yearlong deployment, reporters-turned-filmmakers Catrin Einhorn and Leslye Davis stuck with the story to trace the longterm effects of military service on a family.

At once a verité portrait of ordinary people living in the shadow of active duty and a longitudinal survey of the intergenerational cycles of military service, FATHER SOLDIER SON is a profound and deeply personal exploration of the meaning of sacrifice, purpose, duty and American manhood in the aftermath of war.

FATHER SOLDIER SON releases globally on Netflix July 17.

Directed and Produced by:
Leslye Davis & Catrin Einhorn

WATCH THE TRAILER!

2020 NCOA Military Vanguard Award Recipients

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NCOA seal-and logo

The Military Vanguard Award of the Non Commissioned Officers Association is awarded annually to a single member from each of the Armed Services who has distinguished himself or herself through acts of heroism.

The selection is done through a rigorous nominating and screening process within each of the military services.

These awards commemorate and honor an enlisted Medal of Honor recipient from each branch of service.

As it says on Military service is based on a sense of duty, on the assumption that the common good is more important than the individual.

The actions meriting the receipt of the 2020 NCOA Military Vanguard Awards personify the spirit and intent of this most prestigious recognition.

 
 
Recipients of NCOA’s 2020 Military Vanguard Awards were announced via a Zoom Meeting on June 24.

Read the accounts of the heroic actions of our 2020 Military Vanguard Award recipients:

SSG BENJAMIN J. ROBERTS – US ARMY https://ncoausa.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/VG-Story-USA.pdf
US ARMY Vanguard Award

 
 
SSGT SAMUEL S. MULLINS – US MARINES https://ncoausa.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/VG-Story-USMC.pdf
US MARINE Vanguard Award
 
 
SO1 MARK T. PALMER – US NAVY https://ncoausa.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/VG-Story-USN.pdf

 
 
CMSGT JAMES M. TRAFICANTE – US AIR FORCE https://ncoausa.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/VG-Story-USAF.pdf
US AIR FORCE Vanguard Award
 
 
EM2 DANIEL M. PETERS – US COAST GUARD https://ncoausa.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/VG-Story-USCG-1.pdf
US CG Vanguard Award

Foundation Trains Shelter Canines as Service Dogs for Disabled Veterans

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service dog trainer pictured with service dog in his arms

Miracles happen every day at CAMO Foundation, and the angels who perform them are the 4-legged variety. Dedicated to providing service dogs specifically trained for the unique needs of disabled veterans, the nonprofit organization in Palm Beach Gardens, FL is the only organization in the country that uses mature dogs rescued from local pounds.

The brainchild of Mike Lorraine, a professional dog trainer with 20 years experience, the foundation is located on a picturesque farm in south Florida, co-owned by Lorraine and a local area businessman, Joe Mullings. Their mission is simple: Provide military veterans who are physically or emotionally challenged with shelter dogs who have the right qualities—intelligence, focus, drive—to be service animals.

Yes, shelter dogs! Most service dogs are raised as puppies. However, Lorraine believes that there’s a certain fearless, stoic quality that makes select shelter dogs the perfect match for injured combatants. You might say that they’ve both seen conflict and survived.

One of CAMO’s biggest success stories so far is 26-year-old Matt Kleemann, a former Navy diver who specialized in underwater repairs on submarines. While driving home along a snowy road, he swerved to avoid a deer and plunged over a cliff. When he awoke, he was paralyzed from the chest down. Wheelchair-bound, he says, “The original plan was for me to just get my dog, Charlie Brown, but Mike saw potential in me. So, I started to come down every day.” Today, Matt serves as a mentor to visiting veterans.

Continue on to CAMO Foundation to learn more.

Meet the Active Pearl Harbor Veteran that Just Turned 100

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veteran witha huge grin in a shriners hat waving with U.S. flag in the background

On the morning of December 7, 1941, in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Adone “Cal” Calderone had just finished his breakfast aboard the USS West Virginia, when his ship was attacked by eight torpedoes and four bombs from a Japanese air raid.

The 21-year-old soldier was trapped and wounded on the ship from the attacks, taking shrapnel to the face along with other injuries. “The doctors wanted to keep me longer,” Calderone said of his injuries, “I wanted to get back out there.”

Calderone would go on to serve the Navy for a total of six years.

Now a World War II veteran and a survivor of the Pearl Harbor bombings, Calderone resides in Stark County, Ohio, where he just celebrated his 100th birthday.

Calderone enjoys music, driving, staying active, and sharing his experiences from the war. “Dad really gets around,” Calderone’s son, Greg, told Stars and Stripes. “It’s amazing that he’s 100 years old.” Calderone’s 100th birthday officially makes him the oldest known living Pearl Harbor survivor.

“If feels good to be 100,” Calderone said, “It’s so nice, very nice.” Calderone spent the day celebrating with about a dozen of his family members and friends, including his wife of 75 years, Carrie, at a surprise birthday gathering in front of his house.

When asked what the secret was to his 100 years, Calderone gave a smile and reported without hesitation, “Good wine.”

Air Force general confirmed as first black chief of a U.S. military service

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General Charles Q. Brown in uniform

The Senate on Tuesday confirmed Gen. Charles Q. Brown to be the next Air Force chief of staff, making him the first African American leader of a military service as the Pentagon and the country grapple with a raft of racial issues.

The confirmation also makes Brown the second African American officer to sit on the Joint Chiefs of Staff since Chairman Gen. Colin Powell.

The 98-to-0 vote was a blowout approval for the four-star general. Vice President Mike Pence presided over the historic vote.

President Donald Trump, who nominated Brown in March, hailed the general on Twitter.

“My decision to appoint @usairforce General Charles Brown as the USA’s first-ever African American military service chief has now been approved by the Senate,” Trump said, though the tweet came before the confirmation vote. “A historic day for America! Excited to work even more closely with Gen. Brown, who is a Patriot and Great Leader!”

Brown’s nomination had been in the works for months, yet the vote came amid nationwide protests following the death of George Floyd in police custody. Top Air Force officials led the way in speaking out over the past week and calling for dialogue on racism. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Kaleth Wright, the service’s top enlisted leader, became the first senior military official to speak out, and was followed by outgoing Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein.

Brown, who is currently the commander of Pacific Air Forces, delivered an emotional message Friday about his experience as a black airman.

In addition to becoming the first African American service chief, Brown will be the most senior African American Pentagon leader since Powell chaired the Joint Chiefs from 1989 to 1993.

“I’m thinking about how full I am with emotion, not just for George Floyd but for the many African Americans that have suffered the same fate as George Floyd,” Brown said. “I’m thinking about a history of racial issues and my own experiences that didn’t always sing of liberty and equality.

“Without clear-cut answers, I just want to have the wisdom and knowledge to lead during difficult times like these,” Brown said of his nomination to be the service’s top officer. “I want the wisdom and knowledge to lead, participate in and listen to necessary conversations on racism, diversity and inclusion.”

Continue on to Politico to read the complete article.

The Combat Patch for the New Frontline

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circular patch with angel's wings with the text CAM at the top that stands for COVID Angel of Mercy

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, medical professionals and healthcare workers have been at the frontlines to treat those effected by the virus.

As more and more medical personnel sacrificed their time and health for others, Army veteran Jacob Neal began to see the situation in a similar way to a battlefield.

Wanting to show his gratitude for those in the medical field, Neal decided to create a patch to honor healthcare workers, similar to the combat patches worn in the military. The patch features a medical professional dressed like an angelic being holding a stethoscope and a caduceus.

Neal has also created an additional patch for medical support staff, such as janitorial staff. Since the release of his patch, Neal has received orders from across the United States, the United Kingdom, and Afghanistan.

Along with the patches, Neal also created a scholarship fund for families of medical professionals who lost their lives in the fight against COVID-19. Half of all the profits made from the patches is donated to the scholarship fund while the other half is used for Neal to order and ship more patches.

“None of this goes to me getting rich,” Neal said of his new business, “I am just trying to tribute to this new set of heroes.”

Veteran Families Carry a Military Sense of Duty into Their Civilian Work

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famility portrait of mom dad and two children smiling

When his son, Mike, served as a surface warfare officer in the U.S. Navy, Mike O’Sullivan Sr., a former Navy P-3 pilot and 1973 United States Naval Academy graduate, used to talk about how important it was that the equipment on ships work well. Now, both naval veterans work at Raytheon, helping to make the tools and systems members of the military depend on today. Their sense of mission is personal, and deeply rooted in their service experience.

“My dad and I both wanted to do our part to make a good company even better,” O’Sullivan Jr. said. “There is a lot of pride for a father to know his son is continuing the personal mission of service.”

The O’Sullivans are in good company. Raytheon employs more than 10,000 veterans, including other multi-generational families who developed their sense of mission in the military and now carry it over to their work for Raytheon.

The younger O’Sullivan currently works as a program manager for the Patriot missile program. He is also the new vice president of communications for the employee group Raytheon Employee Veterans Network, or RAYVETS. O’Sullivan Sr. retired from his position of senior manager, Supply Chain Capture, in 2014.

Following in Their Mother’s Footsteps
Brenda Boorda retired from the Navy as a commander and has now worked at Raytheon for 17 years. A vice president for Mission Assurance, she also serves as the RAYVETS global president.

Her three sons—Aaron, Andrew, and Phillip—have followed in their mother’s footsteps, coming to Raytheon after serving in the military. Aaron and Andrew served in the U.S. Army; Phillip served in the Marine Corps.

“Being in a family steeped with military tradition, service is like a calling,” said Phillip Boorda, who works in Mission Systems & Sensors. “I carry over the mindset of service into the work I do for Raytheon, where I continue to be part of something bigger than myself.”

His mother encouraged her sons to consider Raytheon first when they left the military for civilian careers. She has helped them transition into their new jobs, translating their skills into their work at Raytheon, a service she has performed for many veterans.

Her sense of duty is deeply ingrained. Boorda came from a military family and married into another military family. After college, she joined the Navy, just as her father, who served aboard diesel submarines, had.

“His uniform has always hung proudly in his closet—even until this day,” Boorda said. “His immense pride for his work resonated with me.”
Now she supports other veterans, often face-to-face, sometimes through virtual mentoring, via Raytheon’s partnership with American Corporate Partners and the Society of Women Engineers.

Carrying Service into Community
Along with its work for the veterans at Raytheon, RAYVETS supports veterans’ organizations in local communities. It’s part of the deep commitment Raytheon has made to help members of the military, veterans and their families.

Raytheon received the Platinum Medallion Award from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Honoring Investments in Recruiting and Employing American Military Veterans medallion program, or HIRE Vets, for its efforts to recruit, employ and retain veterans. It is the only veteran hiring award at the federal level.
Being in a company that employs veterans helps in the transition process to civilian careers, according to Boorda. “Affiliating with others who have shared experiences and goals is a great development experience,” she said.

Sailor Saves Young Man’s Life

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2nd Class Dylan Bryant in Navy Uniform smiling standing on Navy Ship

Every Navy sailor is trained to respond to life-threatening situations, from basic first aid to emergency cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR); on the ship out at sea there are no ambulances or fire fighters to call. Each sailor is a first responder, receiving continuous training until it all becomes muscle memory.

On his usual route home on June 3, Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Mechanical) 2nd Class Dylan Bryant, native of Springfield, Missouri, a recruiter assigned to Navy Talent Acquisition Group Philadelphia, suddenly needed to put the life-saving skills he learned in the Navy to use.

As he was pulling into his apartment complex at Springfield Farms, Bryant noticed an oddly parked vehicle with two men standing near. Like any good motorist assuming it was car troubles, Bryant pulled over and asked if he could offer any assistance.

“I rolled down my window and asked them if everything was okay,” recounted Bryant. “After they both shook their heads ‘no,’ I asked if there was anything I could do to help when one of them looked up and asked me: ‘Do you know CPR?’”

What Bryant didn’t see initially, was a young man, unconscious and breathless, lying on the other side of the vehicle, while his friend, a girl named Kiyana, was trying her best to revive him. In that instant the training, that muscle memory kicked in.

“As soon as I heard ‘Do you know CPR?’ I threw my car in park and ran to the other side of the vehicle,” said Bryant. “I asked her [Kiyana] to step aside and informed her I was CPR qualified, and I would do everything I could to help.”

He continued CPR for 5 or 6 minutes until the local fire department and emergency medical technicians arrived on the scene.

“The entire 5 – 6 minutes seemed like the longest time in my life, as I was trying to keep count of the compressions in my head, and alternating with the breaths,” recalled Bryant. “Later EMTs told me that if I hadn’t performed the CPR when I did, he may not have made it through.”

As EMTs took over, the young man regained consciousness, and Bryant learned his name – Dominique. Bryant doesn’t know what caused the man to become unresponsive, nor which hospital he was taken to, but he feels honored to have been able to render much needed aid and save Dominique’s life.

“Something that Bryant said to me just stuck out, he simply said: ‘I was just in the right place at the right time’,” said Chief Electronics Technician Sean Jenkins, Bryant’s leading chief petty officer at Navy Recruiting Station Hagerstown. “But that’s just the type of person he really is, he wants to make sure that everyone around him is doing well and everyone is ok. I am glad that he was ‘in the right place, at the right time,’ because when you save a life, you are not just saving that one life, you are saving every life that that person has touched.”

NTAG Philadelphia encompasses regions of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and West Virginia, providing recruiting services from more than 30 talent acquisition sites with the overall goal of attracting the highest quality candidates to ensure the ongoing success of America’s Navy.

Source: Navy Outreach

New Movie Portrays Life of Military Wives

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Group of more than a dozen women standing together on stage clapping their hands while singing

A feel-good celebration from director Peter Cattaneo (The Full Monty), Military Wives is inspired by the true story of the first Military Wives Choir.

The film stars Kristin Scott Thomas (The English Patient, Four Weddings and a Funeral), Sharon Horgan (“Catastrophe,” Game Night), with Jason Flemyng (“Jamestown,” Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button), and Greg Wise (Sense and Sensibility, “The Crown”).

Inspired by the popularity of the Military Wives Choir, Military Wives is loosely based on the real story of a small of group of women who banded together and sparked a worldwide movement that now serves more than 2,300 people across the U.K. and in British military bases abroad.

Producer Rory Aitken was introduced to the phenomenon through choirmaster and broadcaster Gareth Malone’s popular BBC television series, “The Choir: Military Wives,” which documented the creation of the second Military Wives Choir in 2011.

“I was unexpectedly moved by it,” says Aitken. “It did what the best movies do. It punched you in the gut. What they did in that documentary was uncover a small section of society that one might never think about, but who actually go through a difficult time in service for the rest of us. And harness the power of music to pull themselves up. It is really extraordinary.”

Producer Ben Pugh was given the documentary by Aitken and immediately felt the material would lend itself to the big screen. “The combination of a real-life struggle of these wives and partners, that is given a voice through the choir, felt completely universal.” he said.

Director Peter Cattaneo admits he came to the project knowing almost nothing about the lives of military families. “I was excited by a concept that would allow me to explore a way of life that has rarely been seen on the big screen, as well as make a film with music and singing at its core,” he recalls.

Two actresses on the set of the movie with one on the piano and the other with hands raised in song
PHOTO-BLEEKER STREET MEDIA

It was essential to the filmmakers that Military Wives accurately portray the daily lives of women whose partners are abroad risking their lives in service to their country. “Our screenwriter Rachel Tunnard met with and communicated with a group of wives to get details and anecdotes about their world,” says Cattaneo. “She had some quite intense and moving exchanges with them that brought a lot of reality into the script.”

As Cattaneo started meeting real military wives, he discovered two rich themes at the heart of the narrative: A fragmented group of people coming together through song, and the idea of women who are expected to “keep calm and carry on” finding their voices. “We got to know some very courageous and candid military wives who shared personal stories that were humbling, sometimes harrowing, and often hilarious,” he says. “I was struck by their honest, down-to-earth humor and I became determined to fill the film with this kind of comedy.”

The women’s satisfaction with the final screenplay became evident, he says, when several asked to appear in the film as extras. “In the scene where all the soldiers are going off to war, we used as many of them as we could. So when you see that scene, remember that those are real military families saying goodbye.

Military Wives movie poster with name of movie ans and two stars of the movie standing back to back smiling“Although the characters and much of the story is fictionalized, every effort was made to honor the huge sacrifices real military families make every day,” says Producer Piers Tempest. “I think the best films have a deep truth in them, and that’s what we felt about this story.

Nobody talks about them, but military wives are—forgive the pun—the unsung heroes of the armed forces.”

Watch the trailer on YouTube!

Available on Hulu, Amazon Prime, Google Play and more.

Operation Airdrop

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Operation Airdrop image with a red white and blue parachute centered in between the words

Operation Airdrop was held on Memorial Day, Monday, May 25th, in Fort Worth and Arlington, as a combined effort between the Airpower Foundation, The All Veteran Group, Fort Worth Oral Surgery, Baylor Scott & White, Armed Forces Bowl, Lockheed Martin, Classic Chevy, Harris, JPS, Tarrant Regional Water District, Bell Fort Worth Alliance Airshow, Alliance Aviation Service, The Vintage Flying Museum, The Texas Rangers, The City of Fort Worth, and The City of Arlington.

Mike Elliott, President of the All Veteran Group and a retired U.S. Army Golden Knight, performed a parachute demonstration with his team over the city of Arlington, and a tribute on the ground in Fort Worth due to weather.

Colored smoke traced the sky as they parachuted over the city of Arlington symbolizing the loving appreciation we all feel for our healthcare workers, first responders, and our fallen military heroes.

The Airpower Foundation relies on the generous donations of our sponsors and supporters to continue our mission in support of all who serve and their families.

 

Please visit AirpowerFoundation.org and consider making a donation.

Providing Business, DVBE. Employment & Educational Opportunities For Veterans

Rutgers

Rutgers-Camden

Verizon

Verizon Wireless

Central Michigan

   
*Please be sure to check event websites for latest updates on postponements or cancellations due to COVID-19 precautions.