101+ Resource Guide for Veterans

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Resource Guide for Veterans

The ultimate resource guide assists vets with their transition to civilian life

America depends on its military veterans and their families to keep us safe at home and around the world. But their sacrifices come at a cost; every day in the United States, 21 veterans commit suicide and another 50,000 veterans are homeless.

These unacceptable statistics inspired the creation of a new resource for military families entitled 101+ Resources for Veterans: The Ultimate Resource Guide.

Published in July, the new guide is the work of Washington, D.C.-based author and radio personality Jennifer Hammond in association with A Hero Foundation, aherofoundation.org, a nonprofit group based in Beverly Hills, California, formed to assist military veterans as they transition to civilian life.

101+ Resources for Veterans, which took two years to research and write, brings together nonprofit, for-profit and government resources that are available to veterans in such areas as employment, education, entrepreneurship, wellness, transitioning home after service, community and housing, GI support and scholarships, financial services and social services.

Already an Amazon bestseller, the book represents a way of giving back for Hammond, who was adopted by a military family as a teenager. Jennifer HammondShe credits that family with encouraging her to finish high school and obtain a scholarship to complete college and graduate school.

Hammond’s goal was to create a book that is more user friendly than the cumbersome annual directory produced by the Department of Veteran Affairs, which lists many inactive websites and organizations whose voice mail boxes are full or do not return phone calls. Her book aims to feature the most effective organizations and will be updated to keep it current.

Jennifer Hammond
Jennifer Hammond

Jennifer Hammond is an author, real estate professional, SiriusXM radio talk show host and advocate for veterans. She has brought veterans issues to light while interviewing seven congressmen on Capitol Hill for the Veterans Legislative Forum, the Veterans Homelessness Forum, and the Military Family Housing Forum for radio shows at SiriusXM, where she hosts her own radio program on real estate. Hammond has been featured on ABC, Bravo and HGTV’s Flipping Boston. She is the granddaughter and great-granddaughter of career Army soldiers.

Best Tech Majors for High Paying Jobs

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Business man pointing finger towards computer screen with a flash of light surrounding screen and his hands on the keyboard

Your military service has prepared you for a lot. You have a desirable skillset that can be used in any work environment, you’re entitled to generous financial aid, and you have a perspective that can positively contribute to the workforce.

What’s the best career for you to apply your skills?

If you’re one of the many veterans looking to return to school but unsure about what major to pick, consider majoring in a tech field. Tech jobs are not only high-paying, diverse, secure and consistently growing, but these fields have experience in veteran hiring and recruiting practices.

Here are some of the most popular tech majors for veterans:

Computer and Information Technology:
Information technology (IT) is the use of computers to create, process, store, retrieve and exchange all kinds of data and information. Employment in computer and information technology occupations is projected to grow 13 percent from 2020 to 2030, faster than the average for all occupations.

Popular Information Technology Careers:
■ IT Analyst
■ IT Technician
■ Data Scientist
■ Systems Analyst
Those in the information technology field make an average salary of about $97,430, which is higher than the median annual wage for all occupations by about $52,000.

Web Development:
Web developers create and maintain websites. They are also responsible for the site’s technical aspects, such as its performance and capacity, which are measures of a website’s speed and how much traffic the site can handle. Web developers may also create content for the site. Jobs in this field are expected to grow by 13 percent, about double the average rate for all other occupations.

Popular Web Development Careers:
■ Digital Design
■ Application Developer
■ Computer Programming
■ Front-End and Back-End Development
■ Webmaster
Web designers make an average of about $77,200 per year.

Database Management:
Database administrators and architects create or organize systems to store and secure a variety of data, such as financial information and customer shipping records. They also make sure that the data is available to authorized users. Most big-name companies utilize database administration, offering employment at companies of all backgrounds and environments. Jobs in this field are growing at a steady rate of about eight percent.

Popular Database Management Careers:
■ Database Engineer
■ Database Manager
■ Cybersecurity
■ Security Engineer
The average salary for database management is about $98,860 per year.

Software Development:
Software developers create computer applications that allow users to do specific tasks and the underlying systems that run devices or control networks. They create, maintain and upgrade software to meet the needs of their clients. Jobs in this field are growing extremely fast at about 22 percent.

Popular Software Development Careers:
■ Software Engineer
■ Full-stack Developer
■ Quality Assurance Analyst
■ App Developer
■ System Software Developer
The average salary for software development is about $110,140 per year.

Sources: Indeed.com, BLS,

Questions to Ask Before Selecting a School

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Female soldier with books on USA flag background

Before applying for the first college that comes to mind, consider your goals to determine what you need from higher education.

While most colleges and universities offer an excellent education, many factors can contribute to your overall experience.

Some universities may be in undesirable locations, not provide the full benefits you could receive as a veteran or might not have the best program for your desired major.

Is this school accredited?

Accreditation is a process where a recognized group (an accreditor) looks at a school’s education program and decides whether it meets an acceptable quality standard. When choosing your school, you’ll want to confirm that it meets this accreditation status. If you attend a school that does not meet that accreditation status, you may be unable to transfer to a different school or obtain the specific courses you need to graduate. Schools that are not accredited are also not eligible to utilize federal funding programs.

What type of institution is this?

You have some options regarding the types of schools you might consider. A college or university might be a public, nonprofit (sometimes called “private”) or for-profit institution. The category can affect what you might be able to study and how much you’ll pay. Your post-9/11 GI Bill benefits make you an appealing candidate — especially to for-profit schools. Still, you’ll want to ensure that the school is more interested in giving you the education you need than the funds they receive from your enrollment. Typically, schools are differentiated by the following:

Public and nonprofit universities:

  • Usually accredited
  • Not owned by an individual or business
  • Offer a variety of majors
  • Strive to help students learn

For-profit universities:

  • Not always accredited
  • Owned by a person or business
  • Often focuses on a few majors or areas of study
  • Money driven

Does this school cover my needs for my major?

Start by researching the “top schools” for your major of interest to narrow down a list. Many schools may offer the major you want to pursue, but not all of them will have the same resources, training and opportunities you’ll need to get the best education possible. Look into your area of focus at the schools you’re interested in and see which ones offer the most extensive benefits.

How else does this school compare?

Just because a school offers your desired major or has the best program for your future career doesn’t mean the school is the best fit for you. Some schools produce more graduating students, have higher acceptance rates and better utilize your GI Bill benefits than others. Compare your top schools to see which one can best accommodate all of these needs. Some other things to consider:

  • What is the graduation rate at this school?
  • Will my GI benefits cover all of the costs?
  • Are there opportunities for internships?

Does this school offer the Yellow Ribbon Program?

The Yellow Ribbon Program can help you pay for the higher out-of-state, private, overseas or graduate school tuition and fees that the Post-9 /11 GI Bill doesn’t cover. Depending on your educational and career goals, choosing a school that utilizes the Yellow Ribbon Program may be the best move to save you money and find an institution that understands the needs of veterans. To find a list of schools offering the Yellow Ribbon Program this year, visit va.gov, and search for Yellow Ribbon.

How will this school support you as a veteran?

As a veteran, you have life experiences that not everyone else can relate you. Your college campus is going to be a place where you’ll be spending a large portion of your time. Why not make it a place that meets more than your educational needs? Look into the kinds of veteran programs and supports that your school offers. Do they have a chapter of the Student Veterans of America? Do other veterans attend this school? What kinds of extracurricular activities or clubs do they have? This might not seem like the most critical aspect of choosing a school but having a support system can be extremely helpful regardless of the educational path you decide to take.

Sources: Federal Trade Commission Consumer Advice, Military Consumer, VA

Free Resume Guide for Veterans

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Switching careers takes courage. And veterans know a thing or two about courage. But when military personnel finish serving their country and look to re-enter civilian life, they need more than just strong nerves to make the transition to a new career. Finding a job demands practical strategies. According to a Pew Research Center study, 95% of veterans seek employment after serving in the military.

26% of veteran respondents, however, found shifting from the military to the civilian lifestyle to be somewhat difficult.

One of the biggest struggles for veterans is creating a compelling military to civilian resume that’s going to help them get a job that’s well-paid and enjoyable.
 
 
Learn everything you need to know to create a compelling veteran resume, including:

  • Military to Civilian Resume Example
  • How to Write a Military Veteran Resume (8 Simple Steps)
  • Free Military to Civilian Resume Template
  • Essential (Free) Job-Search Resources for Veterans

Read on for your free resume guide, complete with sample resumes at https://novoresume.com/career-blog/military-veterans-resume.

Veteran Entrepreneur Resources

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The soldier's military tokens are on dollar bills. Concept: cost

SBA offers support for veterans as they enter the world of business ownership. Look for funding programs, training, and federal contracting opportunities.

Devoted exclusively to promoting veteran entrepreneurship, the OVBD facilitates the use of all U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) programs by veterans, service-disabled veterans, reservists, active-duty service members, transitioning service members, and their dependents or survivors.

SBA programs provide access to capital and preparation for small business opportunities. They can also connect veteran small business owners with federal procurement and commercial supply chains.

The Veterans Business Outreach Center Program is an OVBD initiative that oversees Veterans Business Outreach Centers (VBOC) across the country. This small business program features a number of success stories and offers business plan workshops, concept assessments, mentorship, and training for eligible veterans.

Funding for veteran-owned small businesses

You can use SBA tools like Lender Match to connect with lenders. In addition, SBA makes special consideration for veterans through several programs.

Veteran entrepreneurship training programs

SBA programs feature customized curriculums, in-person classes, and online courses to give veterans the training to succeed. These programs teach the fundamentals of business ownership and provide access to SBA resources and small business experts.

Government contracting programs for veterans

Every year, the federal government awards a portion of contracting dollars specifically to businesses owned by military veterans. Also, small businesses owned by veterans may be eligible to purchase surplus property from the federal government.

Check out the rules of eligibility for these government contracting programs for veterans.

Military spouse resources

Military spouses make great entrepreneurs, and small business ownership can be a transportable.

Continue reading on sba.gov/veteran-owned-business.

Choosing a Major? Join the Tech Field

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young man walking with backpack and laptop in hand

Your military service has prepared you for a lot. You have a desirable skillset that can be used in any work environment, you’re entitled to generous financial aid, and you have a perspective that can positively contribute to the workforce. What’s the best career for you to apply your skills?

If you’re one of the many veterans looking to return to school but unsure about what major to pick, consider majoring in a tech field.

Tech jobs are not only high-paying, diverse, secure and consistently growing, but these fields have experience in veteran hiring and recruiting practices.

Here are some of the most popular tech majors for veterans:

Computer and Information Technology: Information technology (IT) is the use of computers to create, process, store, retrieve and exchange all kinds of data and information. Employment in computer and information technology occupations is projected to grow 13 percent from 2020 to 2030, faster than the average for all occupations.

Popular Information Technology Careers:

  • IT Analyst
  • IT Technician
  • Data Scientist
  • Systems Analyst

Those in the information technology field make an average salary of about $97,430, which is higher than the median annual wage for all occupations by about $52,000.

Web Development: Web developers create and maintain websites. They are also responsible for the site’s technical aspects, such as its performance and capacity, which are measures of a website’s speed and how much traffic the site can handle. Web developers may also create content for the site. Jobs in this field are expected to grow by 13 percent, about double the average rate for all other occupations.

Popular Web Development Careers:

  • Digital Design
  • Application Developer
  • Computer Programming
  • Front-End and Back-End Development
  • Webmaster

Web designers make an average of about $77,200 per year.

Database Management: Database administrators and architects create or organize systems to store and secure a variety of data, such as financial information and customer shipping records. They also make sure that the data is available to authorized users. Most big-name companies utilize database administration, offering employment at companies of all backgrounds and environments. Jobs in this field are growing at a steady rate of about eight percent.

Popular Database Management Careers:

  • Database Engineer
  • Database Manager
  • Cybersecurity
  • Security Engineer

The average salary for database management is about $98,860 per year.

Software Development:

Software developers create computer applications that allow users to do specific tasks and the underlying systems that run devices or control networks. They create, maintain and upgrade software to meet the needs of their clients. Jobs in this field are growing extremely fast at about 22 percent.

Popular Software Development Careers:

  • Software Engineer
  • Full-stack Developer
  • Quality Assurance Analyst
  • App Developer
  • System Software Developer

The average salary for software development is about $110,140 per year.

Sources: Indeed.com, BLS, Wikipedia

VA to pay for all emergency mental health care

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Young depressed military man talking about emotional problems with psychotherapist at doctor's office

Starting Jan. 17, Veterans in acute suicidal crisis will be able to go to any VA or non-VA health care facility for emergency health care at no cost – including inpatient or crisis residential care for up to 30 days and outpatient care for up to 90 days. Veterans do not need to be enrolled in the VA system to use this benefit.

This expansion of care will help prevent Veteran suicide by guaranteeing no cost, world-class care to Veterans in times of crisis. It will also increase access to acute suicide care for up to 9 million Veterans who are not currently enrolled in VA.

Preventing Veteran suicide is VA’s top clinical priority and a top priority of the Biden-Harris Administration. This effort is a key part of VA’s 10-year National Strategy for Preventing Veteran Suicide and the Biden-Harris administration’s plan for Reducing Military and Veteran Suicide. In September, VA released the 2022 National Veteran Suicide Prevention Annual Report, which showed that Veteran suicides decreased in 2020 for the second year in a row, and that fewer Veterans died by suicide in 2020 than in any year since 2006.

“Veterans in suicidal crisis can now receive the free, world-class emergency health care they deserve – no matter where they need it, when they need it, or whether they’re enrolled in VA care,” said VA Secretary for Veterans Affairs Denis McDonough. “This expansion of care will save Veterans’ lives, and there’s nothing more important than that.”

VA has submitted an interim final rule to the federal register to establish this authority under section 201 of the Veterans Comprehensive Prevention, Access to Care, and Treatment (COMPACT) Act of 2020. The final policy, which takes effect on Jan. 17, will allow VA to:

-Provide, pay for, or reimburse for treatment of eligible individuals’ emergency suicide care, transportation costs, and follow-up care at a VA or non-VA facility for up to 30 days of inpatient care and 90 days of outpatient care.
-Make appropriate referrals for care following the period of emergency suicide care.
-Determine eligibility for other VA services and benefits.
-Refer eligible individuals for appropriate VA programs and benefits following the period of emergency suicide care.

Eligible individuals, regardless of VA enrollment status, are:

-Veterans who were discharged or released from active duty after more than 24 months of active service under conditions other than dishonorable.
-Former members of the armed forces, including reserve service members, who served more than 100 days under a combat exclusion or in support of a contingency operation either directly or by operating an unmanned aerial vehicle from another location who were discharged under conditions other than dishonorable.
-Former members of the armed forces who were the victim of a physical assault of a sexual nature, a battery of a sexual nature, or sexual harassment while serving in the armed forces.

Over the past year, VA has announced or continued several additional efforts to end Veteran suicide, including establishing 988 (then press 1) as a way for Veterans to quickly connect with caring, qualified crisis support 24/7; proposing a new rule that would reduce or eliminate copayments for Veterans at risk of suicide; conducting an ongoing public outreach effort on firearm suicide prevention and lethal means safety; and leveraging a national Veteran suicide prevention awareness campaign, “Don’t Wait. Reach Out.”

If you’re a Veteran in crisis or concerned about one, contact the Veterans Crisis Line to receive 24/7 confidential support. You don’t have to be enrolled in VA benefits or health care to connect. To reach responders, Dial 988 then Press 1, chat online at VeteransCrisisLine.net/Chat, or text 838255.

Source: VA.gov

2-Week Virtual REBOOT Workshops

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The transition to civilian life is not a job change . . .It’s a life change! Our 2-Week Virtual REBOOT WorkshopTM Will Help You ReLearn ! ReBuild ! ReBrand

Making the transition back to civilian life from the military to civilian life can be a difficult challenge, especially for the newer and younger generation of service men and women who were deployed several times to Iraq and Afghanistan.

Designed for active-duty service members, guard/reserves, veterans and dependents, the REBOOT Workshop™ is a series of behavior-based educational seminars that promotes a successful social transition from military service to civilian life. The goal of the workshop is to assist veterans in re-framing their mindset from the military to civilian lifestyle, with all veterans achieving, within their potential, their goals in the TRANSITION DOMAINS of:

Employment and Career, Education, Living Situation, Personal Effectiveness & Wellbeing, and Community-Life Functioning.

2 Week Virtual REBOOT Workshop™ Schedule
(8:00am – 1:00pm PST Time Zone*)
• Feb 6 – 17, 2023
• Mar 6 – 17, 2023 (Women Only)
• Apr 3 – 14, 2023
• May 1 – 12, 2023
• Jun 5 – 16, 2023
• Jul 10 – 21, 2023
• Aug 7 – 18, 2023
• Sep 11 – 22, 2023
• Oct 16 – 27, 2023 (Women Only)
• Oct 30 – Nov 09, 2023
• Dec 4 – 15, 2023
• Jan 8 – 19, 2024

REBOOT Your Life, and A New Career, ENROLL Today at: rebootworkshop.vet or call 866.535.7624 for more information.

VA plans to waive medical copays for Native American vets

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The sign of the Department of Veteran Affairs is seen in front of the headquarters building in Washington

By Leo Shane III

Veterans Affairs officials soon will waive most copayments related to medical care for American Indian and Alaska Native veterans in an effort to encourage more of them to use VA health services.

Officials detailed the effort in a proposed rule released in the Federal Register on Tuesday. They have not yet released a timeline for exactly when the copayments will be ended, but the final rule is expected to be approved in coming months.

The department has already pledged to reimburse all eligible veterans for any copayments made between Jan. 5, 2022, and the date of that final approval.

“American Indian and Alaska Native Veterans have played a vital role in the defense of the United States as members of the Armed Forces for more than 200 years,” VA Secretary Denis McDonough said in a statement accompanying the announcement. “This rule makes health care more accessible and allows us to better deliver to these veterans the care and health benefits that they have earned through their courageous service.”

VA estimates about 150,000 American Indian and Alaska Native veterans are living in the country today, and Defense Department officials have estimated that roughly 24,000 active duty service members belong to the same groups.

Veterans Affairs officials said they do not have a reliable estimate on how many of those veterans are currently using department health care services.

Read the complete article on Military Times.

The Yellow Ribbon Program Has Expanded

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Yellow Ribbon Program

What You Need to Know:

If you’re eligible for the maximum benefit rate under the Post-9/11 GI Bill, but still need additional funding, you might already be aware of the advantages of the Yellow Ribbon Program.

For the 2022-2023 school year, these benefits have expanded to offer additional coverage to active-duty service members and spouses using transferred benefits of an active-duty service member.

What you should know:

What is the maximum amount covered by the GI Bill?

For the 2022-2023 school year (August 31, 2022‑July 1, 2023) the maximum amount is $26,361.37.

I wasn’t eligible last year, am I eligible now?

Besides meeting the maximum benefits requirements under the Post-9/11 GI Bill, you must identify with one of the following to qualify for the Yellow Ribbon Program:

  • Served an aggregate period of at least 36 months on active duty and were honorably discharged
  • You received a Purple Heart on or after September 11, 2001, and were honorably discharged after any amount of service
  • You served at least 30 continuous days (all at once, without a break) on or after September 11, 2001, and were discharged or released from active duty for a service-connected disability
  • You’re a dependent child using benefits transferred by a veteran
  • You’re a Fry Scholar

As of August 1, 2022, active-duty service members and spouses using transferred benefits may now partake in the Yellow Ribbon program, as long as they identify with one of the two situations:

  • You’re an active-duty service member who has served at least 36 months on active duty (either all at once or with breaks in service)
  • You’re a spouse using the transferred benefits of an active-duty service member who has served at least 36 months on active duty

How do I transfer my benefits to my spouse?

If you have already transferred your Post-9/11 GI Bill Benefits to your spouse/dependent and they meet the necessary qualifications for the Yellow Ribbon program, then they should already be eligible for the Yellow Ribbon Program as of August 2022.

What is the application process?

If you submit an application for the Post-9/11 GI Bill to VA and are eligible at the 100 percent benefit level, VA will issue you a Certificate of Eligibility advising that you are potentially eligible for the Yellow Ribbon Program. You should provide your Certificate of Eligibility to your school which, in turn, will determine if there are slots available for the Yellow Ribbon Program (based on its agreement with the VA).

If your school has already sent us an enrollment certification, and it is processed at the same time as your application, your award letter will also display your benefit level. The school is responsible for notifying you whether or not you are accepted and approved for the Yellow Ribbon Program. The school then submits an enrollment form to VA, certifying information that is used to make payment to the school for tuition and fees and for Yellow Ribbon Program payments.

What fees will be covered?

All mandatory fees for a student’s program of education may be included. Any fees that are not mandatory, such as room and board, study abroad (unless the study abroad course is a requirement for the degree program) and penalty fees (such as late registration, return check fees and parking fines) cannot be included. These fees are not payable under the Yellow Ribbon Program or under the Post-9/11 GI Bill.

For more information on the Yellow Ribbon Program and how to apply, visit benefits.va.gov.

Source: Department of Veterans Affairs

Cheeriodicals: Team Building That Matters

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cheeriodicals team building group holding magazines

Cheeriodicals recently delivered  personalized cheer-up duffel bags containing patriotic and convenience items to VA Hospitals, which included our current issue of U.S. Veterans Magazine.

About Cheeriodicals
Cheeriodicals provides a one-of-a-kind corporate team building experience focused on corporate social responsibility. Our Team Building that Matters concept is a turnkey, meaningful celebration on a local and national level.

We flawlessly execute an impactful, user-friendly event to unite your team while ultimately making a difference for those who could use a dose of cheer.

For more information about Cheeriodicals visit, https://cheeriodicals.com/

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