Paralyzed Veteran, Joel Hunt, Hosts Podcast Giving A Voice To Fellow Veterans

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The Colorado-based Paralympian and Purple Heart Recipient Gains Momentum With The H-Train Show on Military Brotherhood Radio.

After suffering a traumatic brain injury and leg paralyzation while serving in Baqubah, Iraq, Joel Hunt has beat the odds by competing as a paralympian skier in the 2014 Paralympics in Sochi, Russia. Hunt was the first to compete in the Paralympics with his aforementioned brain injury. He is now the host of The H-Train Show, a podcast that is devoted to sharing the stories of veterans. Hunt volunteers his time for this podcast as a way to give back to his fellow veterans.

The H-Train Show is broadcast on Military Brotherhood Radio, Joel Huntwhich prides itself on being “radio with a reason.” The show features interviews with former veterans, those involved with veteran assistance, as well as notable public figures. Hunt’s intent with the podcast is to see that veterans get recognition and inform them of programs that exist in addition to Veterans’ Affairs.

Hunt joined the Army in 1998 and was injured during his third deployment in Iraq and had to return home to the care of his parents. He soon learned how to continue life in a wheelchair. His parents urged him to attend a military ski camp in 2008 which tested his strength and tenacity. He became nationally ranked by the 2009-2010 ski season, leading him to the Canadian nationals where he qualified for the World Cup and Paralympics in Sochi, Russia. Following his participation in Russia in 2014, Hunt retired from skiing and began volunteering full-time with his radio show.

Hunt was born and raised in Kokomo, Indiana and is now recognized as the first Paralympian from his hometown. He has gained recognition for his athletic talent across the nation, and was given a Purple Heart from Forgotten Heroes. He currently resides in Denver, Colorado with his loving and supportive wife, Kassie Hunt.

Free Resume Guide for Veterans

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Switching careers takes courage. And veterans know a thing or two about courage. But when military personnel finish serving their country and look to re-enter civilian life, they need more than just strong nerves to make the transition to a new career. Finding a job demands practical strategies. According to a Pew Research Center study, 95% of veterans seek employment after serving in the military.

26% of veteran respondents, however, found shifting from the military to the civilian lifestyle to be somewhat difficult.

One of the biggest struggles for veterans is creating a compelling military to civilian resume that’s going to help them get a job that’s well-paid and enjoyable.
 
 
Learn everything you need to know to create a compelling veteran resume, including:

  • Military to Civilian Resume Example
  • How to Write a Military Veteran Resume (8 Simple Steps)
  • Free Military to Civilian Resume Template
  • Essential (Free) Job-Search Resources for Veterans

Read on for your free resume guide, complete with sample resumes at https://novoresume.com/career-blog/military-veterans-resume.

Landing a job was no fluke

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Steven Culp headshot

By Camille Cates, DAV

Steven Culp turned 18 only nine days after 9/11. “I felt the call to serve immediately after that event,” said Culp.

He served six years in the Navy as an electronic warfare technician and a cryptologic technician.

After his enlistment, Culp enrolled in college and earned a degree in engineering. But his wartime service had changed him, and after seeking help from the VA, he was enrolled in their Veteran Readiness and Employment program.

That’s when he discovered DAV job fairs.

“At the job fair, there was just about every profession you could think of: engineering; software; technicians for electronics, mechanics or engines; law enforcement. There are opportunities for just about everything there,” said Culp. “With the skills that are built in the military, there is something for every veteran.”

Though he had interviewed with several companies, there was one in particular with whom Culp wanted to connect.

“I was first introduced to Fluke when I was on active duty in the Navy. I used their multimeters for all kinds of tests around the shop, making sure our gear was in spec and working correctly,” he said. “When I saw their logo at the job fair, I went over and spoke with them. Turns out the two gentlemen there recruiting were former Navy. They took a look at my resume and my experience and they said, ‘Can you start on Monday?’”

Culp accepted a position as a service engineer with Fluke Corp., a maker of industrial testing and diagnostic equipment.

“Steven’s story is an excellent example of securing meaningful employment through participation in a DAV job fair,” said DAV National Employment Director Rob Lougee. “Separating service members, veterans and their spouses should take the time to check out our employment resources at jobs.dav.org.”

“They can find everything from our full schedule of in-person and virtual job fairs to resources for entrepreneurs.”

DAV job fairs and employment resources provide veterans and their spouses with the prospect of an exciting career path.

“This opportunity means the world to me,” he said. “It’s truly a second chance. I’m eternally grateful to the VA and DAV for the opportunity I’ve been given.”

Read the article originally posted on dav.org.

Choosing a Major? Join the Tech Field

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young man walking with backpack and laptop in hand

Your military service has prepared you for a lot. You have a desirable skillset that can be used in any work environment, you’re entitled to generous financial aid, and you have a perspective that can positively contribute to the workforce. What’s the best career for you to apply your skills?

If you’re one of the many veterans looking to return to school but unsure about what major to pick, consider majoring in a tech field.

Tech jobs are not only high-paying, diverse, secure and consistently growing, but these fields have experience in veteran hiring and recruiting practices.

Here are some of the most popular tech majors for veterans:

Computer and Information Technology: Information technology (IT) is the use of computers to create, process, store, retrieve and exchange all kinds of data and information. Employment in computer and information technology occupations is projected to grow 13 percent from 2020 to 2030, faster than the average for all occupations.

Popular Information Technology Careers:

  • IT Analyst
  • IT Technician
  • Data Scientist
  • Systems Analyst

Those in the information technology field make an average salary of about $97,430, which is higher than the median annual wage for all occupations by about $52,000.

Web Development: Web developers create and maintain websites. They are also responsible for the site’s technical aspects, such as its performance and capacity, which are measures of a website’s speed and how much traffic the site can handle. Web developers may also create content for the site. Jobs in this field are expected to grow by 13 percent, about double the average rate for all other occupations.

Popular Web Development Careers:

  • Digital Design
  • Application Developer
  • Computer Programming
  • Front-End and Back-End Development
  • Webmaster

Web designers make an average of about $77,200 per year.

Database Management: Database administrators and architects create or organize systems to store and secure a variety of data, such as financial information and customer shipping records. They also make sure that the data is available to authorized users. Most big-name companies utilize database administration, offering employment at companies of all backgrounds and environments. Jobs in this field are growing at a steady rate of about eight percent.

Popular Database Management Careers:

  • Database Engineer
  • Database Manager
  • Cybersecurity
  • Security Engineer

The average salary for database management is about $98,860 per year.

Software Development:

Software developers create computer applications that allow users to do specific tasks and the underlying systems that run devices or control networks. They create, maintain and upgrade software to meet the needs of their clients. Jobs in this field are growing extremely fast at about 22 percent.

Popular Software Development Careers:

  • Software Engineer
  • Full-stack Developer
  • Quality Assurance Analyst
  • App Developer
  • System Software Developer

The average salary for software development is about $110,140 per year.

Sources: Indeed.com, BLS, Wikipedia

Navy veteran scores dream job in outreach role with Commanders

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Chris Bailey speaks to a group of service members

By Dave Lubach, Army Times

It would be pretty tough to top the first-week work experience Chris Bailey had with the Washington Commanders. A fan of the NFL team since he was young, Bailey was new to his job as Salute Leader for the Commanders and sitting in on his first meeting when in walked someone he had no trouble recognizing.

“They bring me into a team meeting and I realized that Doug Williams is in this meeting with me,” Bailey said.
 
Chris Bailey, now the Salute Leader for the Washington Commanders, speaks to a group of service members.

“I watched him win the Super Bowl, as the first Black quarterback to win a Super Bowl, and now he’s on the staff here with the team.

“I was like, ‘Am I here? Is this really happening? I’m in a meeting with Doug Williams.’ I walked out that day, called my dad and said, ‘You’re not going to believe this …’”

An NFL football team and a 25-year Navy vet were starting rebrands at nearly the same time. The Commanders were in the infant stages of a transition to a new name, and Bailey was seeking a new career path.

Touchdown, Chris Bailey. He was hired in May of last year to serve as the team’s chief community outreach contact for the many veterans living in Washington D.C., Maryland and Virginia, known as the DMV. All NFL teams have veterans programs as part of the league’s Salute to Service. But to his knowledge, none of them have a leader of the program who can boast 25 years of military experience.

“This happened almost simultaneously with the new brand of the Commanders,” Bailey said. “It’s an easy tie to the DMV, kind of the home of our nation’s military, and what that all means and all the responsibilities, privileges and honors that come with command.”

When he left the Navy as a Captain, Bailey was hoping to land a position in a college athletic department or professional sports administration, but wasn’t necessarily looking for that position to have a military tie.

When the Commanders’ position became available, Bailey jumped at the opportunity.

“I get around at our different events and I meet different guys in uniform who are considering making a transition and they say, ‘He’s working for the NFL. How can I do what you’re doing?’” he said.

Bailey and the Commanders host a pregame event for veterans before every home game that draws about 500 service members and guests. He also helps direct the team’s extensive Veterans Day festivities in November, which includes recruiting more than 90 service members to help hold the flag on the field during the pregame ceremony. He also organizes flyovers throughout the season.

During the offseason, Bailey organizes opportunities for veterans to stay connected to the team through the NFL Draft, mini- and training-camp events, and OTAs.

Those events have led to more “pinch-me” moments, including interactions with Commanders head coach Ron Rivera.

“Coach Rivera is a staunch supporter of our military,” Bailey said. “If I’m on the sideline pregame and he’s got his team out there warming up getting ready for a game, he will see a service member in uniform standing there by the tunnel and he goes out of his way to come over and say ‘thank you’ and say ‘hi’ and recognize what these men and women do for us on a day-to-day basis. That I can do this with a team that has a coach like that, makes it easy for a guy like me to do this job.”

Read the complete article on Army Times.

VA to pay for all emergency mental health care

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Young depressed military man talking about emotional problems with psychotherapist at doctor's office

Starting Jan. 17, Veterans in acute suicidal crisis will be able to go to any VA or non-VA health care facility for emergency health care at no cost – including inpatient or crisis residential care for up to 30 days and outpatient care for up to 90 days. Veterans do not need to be enrolled in the VA system to use this benefit.

This expansion of care will help prevent Veteran suicide by guaranteeing no cost, world-class care to Veterans in times of crisis. It will also increase access to acute suicide care for up to 9 million Veterans who are not currently enrolled in VA.

Preventing Veteran suicide is VA’s top clinical priority and a top priority of the Biden-Harris Administration. This effort is a key part of VA’s 10-year National Strategy for Preventing Veteran Suicide and the Biden-Harris administration’s plan for Reducing Military and Veteran Suicide. In September, VA released the 2022 National Veteran Suicide Prevention Annual Report, which showed that Veteran suicides decreased in 2020 for the second year in a row, and that fewer Veterans died by suicide in 2020 than in any year since 2006.

“Veterans in suicidal crisis can now receive the free, world-class emergency health care they deserve – no matter where they need it, when they need it, or whether they’re enrolled in VA care,” said VA Secretary for Veterans Affairs Denis McDonough. “This expansion of care will save Veterans’ lives, and there’s nothing more important than that.”

VA has submitted an interim final rule to the federal register to establish this authority under section 201 of the Veterans Comprehensive Prevention, Access to Care, and Treatment (COMPACT) Act of 2020. The final policy, which takes effect on Jan. 17, will allow VA to:

-Provide, pay for, or reimburse for treatment of eligible individuals’ emergency suicide care, transportation costs, and follow-up care at a VA or non-VA facility for up to 30 days of inpatient care and 90 days of outpatient care.
-Make appropriate referrals for care following the period of emergency suicide care.
-Determine eligibility for other VA services and benefits.
-Refer eligible individuals for appropriate VA programs and benefits following the period of emergency suicide care.

Eligible individuals, regardless of VA enrollment status, are:

-Veterans who were discharged or released from active duty after more than 24 months of active service under conditions other than dishonorable.
-Former members of the armed forces, including reserve service members, who served more than 100 days under a combat exclusion or in support of a contingency operation either directly or by operating an unmanned aerial vehicle from another location who were discharged under conditions other than dishonorable.
-Former members of the armed forces who were the victim of a physical assault of a sexual nature, a battery of a sexual nature, or sexual harassment while serving in the armed forces.

Over the past year, VA has announced or continued several additional efforts to end Veteran suicide, including establishing 988 (then press 1) as a way for Veterans to quickly connect with caring, qualified crisis support 24/7; proposing a new rule that would reduce or eliminate copayments for Veterans at risk of suicide; conducting an ongoing public outreach effort on firearm suicide prevention and lethal means safety; and leveraging a national Veteran suicide prevention awareness campaign, “Don’t Wait. Reach Out.”

If you’re a Veteran in crisis or concerned about one, contact the Veterans Crisis Line to receive 24/7 confidential support. You don’t have to be enrolled in VA benefits or health care to connect. To reach responders, Dial 988 then Press 1, chat online at VeteransCrisisLine.net/Chat, or text 838255.

Source: VA.gov

The Fastest Growing Jobs of 2023

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The job market is as different as ever, especially given the events of the last several years. Whether you’re looking to enter the workforce for the first time or want to make a career switch, it can be easy to become discouraged in the search for a job that is financially and market secure.

As we enter 2023, take a look at some of the highest paying and most in-demand careers of the year and what you need to get started.

Nurse Practitioner

Nurse practitioners are primary or specialty care providers, delivering advanced nursing services to patients and their families. They assess patients, determine how to improve or manage a patient’s health and discuss ways to integrate health promotion strategies into a patient’s life. Nurse practitioners typically care for a certain population of people. For instance, NPs may work in adult and geriatric health, pediatric health or psychiatric and mental health. While nurse practitioners are predicted to be one of the most in demand jobs of the next year, the healthcare field in its entirety is growing rapidly.

  • Education and Experience: Nurse practitioners usually need a master’s degree in an advanced practice nursing field. They must have a registered nursing license before pursuing education in one of the advanced practical roles. Working in administrative and managerial settings can also be a great way to gain experience and move up in the field.
  • Desired Skillset: Science education background, communication, detail-oriented, interpersonal skills
  • Average Salary: $127, 780
  • Job Growth Rate: 40% (higher than average 8%)
  • Estimated Jobs Added from 2021-2031: 118,600

Data Scientist

Data scientists are responsible for using analytical tools, scientific methods and algorithms to collect and analyze useful information for companies and organizations. Data scientists additionally develop algorithms (sets of instructions that tell computers what to do) and models to support programs for machine learning. They use machine learning to classify or categorize data or to make predictions related to the models. Scientists also must test the algorithms and models for accuracy, including for updates with newly collected data.

  • Education and Experience: Data scientists typically need at least a bachelor’s degree in mathematics, statistics, computer science or a related field to enter the occupation. Some employers require industry-related experience or education. For example, data scientists seeking work in an asset management company may need to have experience in the finance industry or to have completed coursework that demonstrates an understanding of investments, banking or related subjects.
  • Desired Skillset: Analytics, mathematics, computer skills, problem-solving, industry specific knowledge
  • Average Salary: $100, 910
  • Job Growth Rate: 36% (higher than average 8%)
  • Estimated Jobs Added from 2021-2031: 40,500

Information Security Analysts

Cybercrime is at an unfortunate all-time high. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, cybercrime has skyrocketed by 600 percent, creating a greater need for workers in cybersecurity. Information security analysts are responsible for planning and carrying out security measures to protect an organization’s computer networks and systems. They work to maintain software, monitor networks, work closely with IT staff to execute the best protective measures and are heavily involved in creating their organization’s disaster recovery plan, a method of recovering lost data in a cybersecurity emergency.

  • Education and Experience: Information security analysts typically need a bachelor’s degree in a computer science field, along with related work experience. Many analysts have experience in IT. Employers additionally prefer hiring candidates that have their information security certification.
  • Desired Skillset: Established and evolving knowledge in IT, analytics, problem-solving, attention to detail
  • Average Salary: $102, 600
  • Job Growth Rate: 35% (higher than average 8%)
  • Estimated Jobs Added from 2021-2031: 56,500

Financial Management

If math comes easy to you, the field of financial management won’t be slowing down any time soon. Financial managers are responsible for the financial health of an organization or individual. They create financial reports, analyze market trends, direct investment activities and develop plans for the long-term financial goals. They often work with teams, acting as advisors to managers and executives on the financial decisions of a company. Financial Managers may also have more specific titles for more specific roles such as controllers, treasurers, finance officers, credit managers and risk managers.

  • Education and Experience: Financial managers typically need at least a bachelor’s degree in business, economics or a related field. These disciplines help students learn analytical skills and methods. Although not required, earning professional certification is recommended for financial managers looking to provide tangible proof of their competence. Having job experience as a loan officer, accountant or related job may also be helpful in becoming a financial manager.
  • Desired Skillset: Mathematics, organization, communication skills, attention to detail
  • Average Salary: $131, 710
  • Job Growth Rate: 17% (higher than average 8%)
  • Estimated Jobs Added from 2021-2031: 123,100

Computer and Information Research Scientists

Technology is advancing and its need exists in just about every industry. Computer and information research scientists design innovative uses for new and existing technology. They study and solve complex problems in computing for business, science, medicine and other fields. They design and conduct experiments to test the operation of software systems, frequently using techniques from data science and machine learning, often having expertise in programming and/or robotics.

  • Education and Experience: Computer and information research scientists typically need at least a master’s degree in computer science or a related field. In the federal government, a bachelor’s degree may be sufficient for some jobs.
  • Desired Skillset: Mathematics, logical thinking, IT and AI experience, analytics
  • Average Salary: $131,490
  • Job Growth Rate: 21% (higher than average 8%)
  • Estimated Jobs Added from 2021-2031: 7,100

Sources: US Bureau of Labor Statistics, Emeritus Blog, Wikipedia

Military spouses can now apply for ‘game changing’ employment program

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woman veteran searching online with her laptop on table

By Karen Jowers

More than 500 military spouses have registered for a new paid fellowship program, applying to be placed with civilian companies seeking full-time employees.

The Military Spouse Career Accelerator Pilot program is free to employers, and spouses will be paid by the Defense Department during their 12-week fellowships.

It’s open to spouses of currently serving members of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force and Space Force, to include active, reserve and National Guard components. Spouses can find information about how to apply at the Military OneSource Spouse Education and Career Opportunities website. MySECO has a variety of resources and programs to help spouses.

DoD officials announced the launch of the three-year pilot program Thursday, but registration opened for military spouses on Dec. 23. More than 800 spouses have initiated the first step of the registration process; of those, 500 have completed the registration, said DoD spokesman Army Maj. Charlie Dietz.

Military spouses typically move every two, three or four years, and their unemployment rate hovers around 21%, much higher than in the civilian community.

Companies interested in applying to participate can learn more and sign up on the Hiring Our Heroes website, in partnership with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation. Through Dec. 31, 25 employers had registered to participate in the pilot program, Dietz said.

DoD officials expect the first cohort of spouses will be placed with participating employers this month. The pilot program will run for three years and applications will be accepted throughout those three years. Employers can also apply to participate on a rolling basis throughout the length of the program.

Spouses who are accepted will participate in a 12-week paid fellowship program with training and mentoring. They’ll be placed with host companies that match their location, education and work experience, employer needs and other factors.

DoD officials expect the first cohort of spouses will be placed with participating employers this month. The pilot program will run for three years and applications will be accepted throughout those three years. Employers can also apply to participate on a rolling basis throughout the length of the program.

Spouses who are accepted will participate in a 12-week paid fellowship program with training and mentoring. They’ll be placed with host companies that match their location, education and work experience, employer needs and other factors.

Read the complete article on Military Times.

Oldest living Pearl Harbor survivor marks 105th birthday

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Joseph Eskenazi and large family

By Kevin McGill, The Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — Flag-waving admirers lined the sidewalk outside the National World War II Museum in New Orleans on Wednesday to greet the oldest living survivor of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor as he marked his upcoming 105th birthday.

“It feels great,” Joseph Eskenazi of Redondo Beach, California, told reporters after posing for pictures with his great-grandson, who is about to turn 5, his 21-month-old great-granddaughter and six other World War II veterans, all in their 90s.

Eskenazi turns 105 on Jan. 30. He had boarded an Amtrak train in California on Friday for the journey to New Orleans. The other veterans, representing the Army, Navy and Marines, flew in for the event.

(Pictured) World War II veteran Joseph Eskenazi, who at 104 years and 11 months old is the oldest living veteran to survive the attack on Pearl Harbor, sits with fellow veterans, his great grandchildren Mathias, 4, Audrey, 1, and their grandmother Belinda Mastrangelo, at an event celebrating his upcoming 105th birthday at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans, Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2023. (Gerald Herbert/AP)

They were visiting thanks to the Soaring Valor Program, a project of actor Gary Sinise’s charitable foundation dedicated to aiding veterans and first responders. The program arranges trips to the museum for World War II veterans and their guardians.

Eskenazi was a private first class in the Army when the attack occurred. His memories include being awakened when a bomb fell — but didn’t explode — near where he was sleeping at Schofield Barracks, reverberating explosions as the battleship USS Arizona was sunk by Japanese bombs, and machine gun fire from enemy planes kicking up dust around him after he volunteered to drive a bulldozer across a field so it could be used to clear runways.

“I don’t even know why — my hand just went up when they asked for volunteers,” Eskenazi said. “Nobody else raised their hand because they knew that it meant death. … I did it unconsciously.”

He was at the Army’s Schofield Barracks when the Dec. 7, 1941, attack began, bringing the United States into the war. About 2,400 servicemen were killed.

Eskenazi and his fellow veterans lined up for pictures amid exhibits of World War II aircraft and Higgins boats, designed for beach landings.

Read the complete article on Military Times.

2-Week Virtual REBOOT Workshops

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The transition to civilian life is not a job change . . .It’s a life change! Our 2-Week Virtual REBOOT WorkshopTM Will Help You ReLearn ! ReBuild ! ReBrand

Making the transition back to civilian life from the military to civilian life can be a difficult challenge, especially for the newer and younger generation of service men and women who were deployed several times to Iraq and Afghanistan.

Designed for active-duty service members, guard/reserves, veterans and dependents, the REBOOT Workshop™ is a series of behavior-based educational seminars that promotes a successful social transition from military service to civilian life. The goal of the workshop is to assist veterans in re-framing their mindset from the military to civilian lifestyle, with all veterans achieving, within their potential, their goals in the TRANSITION DOMAINS of:

Employment and Career, Education, Living Situation, Personal Effectiveness & Wellbeing, and Community-Life Functioning.

2 Week Virtual REBOOT Workshop™ Schedule
(8:00am – 1:00pm PST Time Zone*)
• Feb 6 – 17, 2023
• Mar 6 – 17, 2023 (Women Only)
• Apr 3 – 14, 2023
• May 1 – 12, 2023
• Jun 5 – 16, 2023
• Jul 10 – 21, 2023
• Aug 7 – 18, 2023
• Sep 11 – 22, 2023
• Oct 16 – 27, 2023 (Women Only)
• Oct 30 – Nov 09, 2023
• Dec 4 – 15, 2023
• Jan 8 – 19, 2024

REBOOT Your Life, and A New Career, ENROLL Today at: rebootworkshop.vet or call 866.535.7624 for more information.

VA plans to waive medical copays for Native American vets

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The sign of the Department of Veteran Affairs is seen in front of the headquarters building in Washington

By Leo Shane III

Veterans Affairs officials soon will waive most copayments related to medical care for American Indian and Alaska Native veterans in an effort to encourage more of them to use VA health services.

Officials detailed the effort in a proposed rule released in the Federal Register on Tuesday. They have not yet released a timeline for exactly when the copayments will be ended, but the final rule is expected to be approved in coming months.

The department has already pledged to reimburse all eligible veterans for any copayments made between Jan. 5, 2022, and the date of that final approval.

“American Indian and Alaska Native Veterans have played a vital role in the defense of the United States as members of the Armed Forces for more than 200 years,” VA Secretary Denis McDonough said in a statement accompanying the announcement. “This rule makes health care more accessible and allows us to better deliver to these veterans the care and health benefits that they have earned through their courageous service.”

VA estimates about 150,000 American Indian and Alaska Native veterans are living in the country today, and Defense Department officials have estimated that roughly 24,000 active duty service members belong to the same groups.

Veterans Affairs officials said they do not have a reliable estimate on how many of those veterans are currently using department health care services.

Read the complete article on Military Times.

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  1. 2-Week Virtual REBOOT Workshop
    January 9, 2023 - January 19, 2024
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    January 26, 2023 - November 1, 2023
  3. Live Virtual REBOOT Workshop
    February 6, 2023 - February 8, 2023
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    February 8, 2023
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    February 16, 2023 - February 18, 2023