Online MBA vs. Campus MBA Program

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First, the ‘online MBA’ stigma

Are you familiar with the rather common statement, “He’s not a real doctor, he’s only a dentist,” in real life or the movies? Accredited online MBA programs have faced a similar stigma for many years. As recently as 2009, employers favored traditional, on-campus degrees. That stigma has started to erode, however. Today, an online MBA is a practical alternative for those who cannot attend full-time on-campus classes.

Two factors drive this change in attitudes. First, if a school has similar offerings on its campus and online, employers only care about the quality of the overall program. The delivery method won’t matter to these employers. Second, online MBA programs have become ubiquitous and extremely popular. Many of the top 20 business schools, including Kelley School of Business, Saunders College of Business at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), and UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School, offer an online version of their traditional MBA programs. At quite a few schools, online MBA students outnumber their counterparts on traditional campuses.

A news article on the changing attitude towards online degrees found that employers accept them much more openly than they did a few years ago. Some employers even favor candidates who’ve juggled studies and other aspects of life. In a study of hiring managers by peer-reviewed electronic journal Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, a majority admitted that they do not differentiate between online and full-time MBAs. Hiring managers also said that it didn’t matter if the online degree was earned from a for-profit institution. When looking at applicants with MBAs, they cared more about the school’s accreditation, reputation, and use of real-world scenarios.

This, however, isn’t a unanimous sentiment. Some employers do Statconsider whether the institution is profit or not-for-profit. The preference is for non-profit schools with the same faculty and curriculum for on-campus and online MBA programs. Though employers respect online MBA programs more, they still expect the program to offer quality learning for all students. As more reputable schools offer online MBAs, these degrees have gained greater acceptance.

Having said that, there should be no qualms about an online MBA being a reliable alternative to a full-time program. What you must now figure out is which method best suits your requirements, preferences and circumstances. This article will help you make a judicious decision as a potential student.

Online MBA vs. Traditional MBA Breakdown

How do the key facets of an MBA degree compare when they are related to a full-time on-campus program versus an online program? What are the advantages and drawbacks of completing your MBA from the comfort of your home? Here’s a brief discussion.

Value Proposition

How do you measure the value proposition of an MBA program? By how well it develops your capacity for leadership? By the opportunities for career growth and salary enhancement? Or by the kind of environment it offers to interact with talented individuals; practice interactions and networking; and improve collaboration and problem-solving skills? All of these go into the final calculation.

Peer interactions in an online MBA program will be limited or at least not as dynamic as those in a full-time program. Some online programs make students spend a few days on campus each year. Others use interactive multimedia tools for student-professor discussions, and many group students into virtual teams. There’s a trade-off, but it’s not insurmountable.

Every other value-generating factor is shared between full-time and online MBAs. Here are some key ones to consider when you’re choosing either.

Accreditation

 Naturally, the reputation of the B-School matters. Accrediting bodies like AACSB, AMBA, or EQUIS rigorously examine a business school’s programs, capabilities, and resources. This, in turn, serves as a reputation enhancer. Accreditation ensures that people will afford your degree the respect it deserves. This in turn helps during a job hunt.

The program

You absolutely need to perform a comprehensive review of the MBA programs under consideration. Ideally, online MBA programs must offer the same curriculum as the on-campus ones. Both programs must comprise of the same readings, assignments, research and activities. Compare the curriculum, required courses and electives, materials, assignments, projects and exams for each.

Faculty

Is one of your MBA subjects taught by a Nobel Prize winner? That’s a major draw with potential major drawbacks. Will the distinguished professor be available to help you learn between media events and book tours? The best way to review future professors is by interacting with current or past students. Confirm that on-campus instructors also teach online classes as well.

Technology

 As an online MBA will be delivered electronically, technology is an important factor to consider. Assess the virtual classroom tools that will be used to support learning. If you’re open to hybrid MBA or part-time on-campus MBA classes, determine whether the software, systems and other learning aids will deliver a dynamic and interactive learning experience.

Campus vs. Online Learning

Many residential colleges have developed online versions of their traditional MBA programs that deliver the same content. The difference lies in the way they distribute information. Campus programs deliver information through in-person lectures, face-to-face discussions, and assignments that are turned in directly to instructors. Full-time MBA students may have lectures at all hours of the day and club or cohort meetings later at night.

Many courses offered in online MBA programs are asynchronous. Students don’t have to log in at a specific time to access lectures, and can view them at their convenience. This flexibility allows you to plan study time and absorb information at your own pace. Lecture videos and audio files can be rewound, paused, or fast-forwarded.

Course management systems will let you see each class’s lectures, assignments, and study guides. After completing an assignment, you can email the file directly to your professor or upload it to the system’s file hosting service. Some professors will prefer one delivery method over another.

The interactive element comes from web conferencing with professors for one or more subjects or coursework, and web chats with peers for group projects. You will need to make time for these occasions, but learning will otherwise be self-paced and comfortable.

Exam schedules can also be viewed by logging into your student account. The online exams may be proctored using a webcam or timed. In the former case, an individual from the school will supervise you. In the latter option, you will need to sit before the testing screen for the full duration of the exam. A few MBA programs expect you to take exams on campus in a proctored setting. Many programs may not conduct exams, and test your understanding through research papers, projects and essays instead.

Career Services

A university’s career services center is staffed by professionals with the unique skills to assist you with career-related concerns. They may have a Master’s in counseling or an associated field or some experience in the corporate or non-profit sector. They can help with self-assessment and solve any issues on career planning that you may be facing. Many will pass on useful career-related information and trends they’ve noticed from their time dealing with employers.

That’s not all. Whether you’re looking for a promotion within your company, a change in function or a complete career transition, career days, alumni panels, on-campus recruitment, job and internship postings, job fairs, corporate information sessions, year-round networking programs, career management workshops, one-on-one career advising, interview coaching and personal branding toolkits are some ways in which a B-School can help you with post-graduate career opportunities.

Students in traditional MBA programs enjoy greater flexibility with career services. They can discuss their preferences with on-campus recruiters or have their resumes reviewed at the career services center. On campus, the approach taken can be more hands-on. Face-to-face involvement with recruiters and faculty keeps you focused and can help with motivation. Help is just a few steps away.

Online MBA programs provide much less versatility with career services. Always confirm that you can sign up for interviews with on-campus recruiters and that career services officers can meet you during non-standard hours. Some B-schools offering online MBAs may offer students access to a full range of career resources. Others may have the new technology to help with long-distance job interviews.

Kelley School of Business at Indiana University, for instance, provides several unique online services. Students in its online program can work with a dedicated career coach, access job-search resources, and connect with alumni. They have separate career development paths for students looking to start a new career and those seeking to grow within their company or industry. Fox School of Business at Temple University offers individual career management coaching, access to a Career Navigator online portal, resume review services, professional development workshops, executive lecture series, job boards, and other useful services.

Reputed online MBA programs generally offer the same career service resources as their on-campus counterparts. If career support from your B-School is a priority, sorting schools by this criteria in your college search online makes sense.

Flexibility

Are you pursuing your online MBA while still employed? Online MBA programs offer a few major benefits for working professionals.

You can complete your coursework at any time from any location.

You can schedule discussions and collaborations at your leisure.

There is no need to live in the same city (or same country) to attend university.

No commuting in rush hour to get to the classroom or wasting time waiting for professors.

Online degrees offer unparalleled flexibility. Remote learning allows you to schedule your study time around work and family commitments. If you’ve been away from a classroom environment for a long time and prefer to work in the comfort of your home, e-learning is a good option. Non-traditional students, those who’ve returned to school after many years, often prefer it. These students are often older and have obligations that prevent them from spending time in a classroom. Many MBA students fit into this category.

E-learning helps you accommodate education into your life as opposed to re-organizing your life around education. You can study in the early morning before the kids wake up, on your lunch hour, or a couple of hours into the night. You don’t have to worry about missing class due to work or your child’s recital or a parent-teacher meeting. If you need to travel a lot for work, you have the flexibility to study in your spare time.

With a traditional MBA program, you have less control over study time. On-campus courses are scheduled in a rigid format, with shorter 50 minute classes and others running longer. Some night classes can go up to three hours. So, you will need to plan your life around class schedules, projects and assignments. In contrast, when you’re pursuing an online degree, you don’t have to sit for long periods of time. You can take breaks as needed and study when you feel most active and focused.

A full-time MBA program will want you to live on or near the campus. If your university is far away from you, long commutes and traffic jams can become a problem.

Interaction

Cognitive theory indicates that when students have more chances to interact, they learn better and enjoy it more. Some of the factors determining the level of interaction in a learning environment include: contacts between student and faculty, cooperation and reciprocity among students, prompt feedback, and expectations of quality communication. In a traditional MBA program, students can connect with professors and peers on campus readily and freely. Distance learning students face the disadvantage of not meeting their peers and faculty members.

Distance learners can still interact with teaching staff, though. Sometimes distance learners have a greater amount of contact in comparison to on-campus students. These traditional students attend lectures but otherwise don’t interact much. Professors will set virtual office hours during which students can message or talk in real time. Online students, however, can’t ask questions or get clarification immediately during a lecture. Instead, they must contact the professor during virtual office hours with questions and concerns.

The student experience, a large part of which involves meeting new people, making friends and attending social events, still changes. The online experience focuses more on academics and less on social networking and development.

A few universities encourage on-campus and distance learning students to form peer-assisted study schemes. Some student unions also work on behalf of distance learners. You can consider joining a union to improve your social experience as an online student.

Online forums, email lists and Facebook groups are some ways in which distant learners can connect with peers. It prevents isolation and helps create a sense of community. If your MBA program needs you to spend some time on campus, make the most of this opportunity to meet other students and get the help you need.

Full-time and online MBAs have their own merits and drawbacks. Compare them based on your own circumstances and you should find the choice that’s right for you.

Source: ©DiscoverBusiness.us

The Different Ways Military Service Can Pay for Your Education

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The cost of higher education and the thought of taking on student debt can be overwhelming at times. Perhaps you don’t think college is right for you now and want to wait.

Whatever the case may be, the military has options to make college affordable—whenever you choose to attend. In addition to unique training and skills you gain as a service member, the military offers several ways to ease the cost of college with tuition assistance, ROTC, scholarships and other educational programs.

Committing to military service while in college

ROTC scholarships: The Reserve Officer Training Corps program is offered by each branch at various colleges and universities across the nation. While attending a school of your choice enrolled in an ROTC program, you will learn leadership, special skills and participate in the military and college experiences. The ROTC program has several options whether you’re straight out of high school, already attending college or prior enlisted. In exchange for a scholarship, there is a service commitment after graduation.

Military service academies: Each branch of the military has a four-year college that offers full scholarships to its students. While in a service academy, you will be held to high academic and physical fitness standards. The application process is extremely competitive and a lengthy process. Applicants must be between ages 17 and 22 and unmarried with no children. After graduation, cadets and midshipmen go on to serve as commissioned officers in the military.

Tuition assistance and other education options while serving

College Loan Repayment Program: There are various benefits available to those who join the military after graduating from college. Qualified candidates could fast track to officer training and apply for the College Loan Repayment Program and more. The military could pay off a portion or all your loans in exchange for a service commitment. This offer is not always available and is contingent on several factors like the type of job you take in the military and the amount of your loans. Keep in mind that not every branch offers this program. A local recruiter can provide specific details on how the program works.

Tuition assistance: As an active-duty service member, you may find time in your schedule to attend school part-time. Each branch offers tuition assistance to help pay for college classes that are $250 or less per semester hour. Tuition assistance can be used for undergraduate and graduate programs as well as several other programs. This program assists greatly in relieving the costs of college. While it may not be able to fully cover college costs, the Top-Up Program allows you to use funds from a GI Bill to cover the remaining costs.

GI Bills: The Department of Veterans Affairs offers several programs to assist both active duty and veterans with the cost of education. The GI Bills are two of the most well-known programs.

National Guard/reserves: Joining the National Guard or reserves allows you to serve in the military part-time and receive education benefits, such as tuition assistance in certain branches and the GI Bill.

Credential program: While serving in the military, you have the ability to receive credentials in a professional field to help you plan for civilian employment after separation or retirement. The Credentialing Opportunities On-Line program offers vouchers to help pay the exam fees of a credentialing organization.

Education options after military service

Post-9/11 GI Bill: When you serve at least 90 days of active-duty service after Sept. 10, 2001 and receive an honorable discharge, you can use the Post-9/11 GI Bill. With this benefit, you can receive up to 100 percent of tuition and fees covered, a yearly book stipend and a monthly housing allowance. As a bonus, if you’re a veteran at the 100 percent benefit level, you may also be eligible for the Yellow Ribbon Program. This program, available at military friendly colleges, covers any tuition or fees that may not have been covered by the Post-9/11 GI Bill.

Montgomery GI Bill: This education benefit requires you to have served at least two years on active duty and have a high school diploma or GED. Unlike the Post-9/11 GI Bill, the Montgomery only covers tuition and fees, and you have up to 10 years after discharge to use the benefit.

Source: militaryonesource.mil

More Military and Families Turn to This University for Online Degrees

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Arizona State University has a long-standing commitment to the military community and its veterans, long after they have finished active duty, and once they are ready to pursue a degree and a new career path in civilian life.

Over the past decade, more military-affiliated families have taken advantage of ASU’s growing, reputable online courses, fulfilling degrees in engineering, criminology, criminal justice studies or social work.

Mario Matus, assistant director of Online Student Services at EdPlus, believes the university has experienced successful recruitment efforts because of its partnership with the Tillman Center, which helps military members transition into student life by assisting with essentials like benefits/funding processing and counseling.

In addition, EdPlus has a team of specialized enrollment advisers and coaches who are trained to answer military-related questions, streamlining support and services for the military/veteran population.

There’s also the appeal of accessibility for military members, especially active duty members, who can pursue an ASU degree online while on deployment without having to be on campus. Matus explains the university is always looking for different ways to assist the military community and better prepare them for success.

“In the past, this has included creating an internal funded scholarship to help reduce costs for our undergrad active duty students using military tuition assistance,” Matus said. “We also developed a free ASU Online orientation course for newly admitted military and veteran students to take prior to their first full class to better prepare them for the online format and military-specific resources available to them.”

ASU is notably invested in research and is deeply committed to building a bridge between students and top leading defense or security-related companies like Boeing, Lockheed Martin and Raytheon to create job opportunities for ASU alums and veterans. In fiscal year 2019, ASU researchers submitted $186 million in proposals to the Department of Defense, received more than $50 million in award obligations and reached more than $36 million in DOD-funded research expenditures.

And the mission to provide higher education resources to military members and their families doesn’t end there. “We are increasing our connection with military bases around the country so we can inform students not only about ASU, but education opportunities overall,” Matus said. “We will continue with efforts like these to support students and prepare them for success.”

Source: https://asunow.asu.edu/

From Battalions to Business Degrees

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If you happen to be one of the millions of veterans leaving the military for civilian life, you face a daunting challenge. You may have flown a gunship; you may have driven a tank; you may have commanded a unit…but how do you convince a corporate recruiter that this counts as management experience?

Tom Tarantino, chief policy officer for Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, admitted to US military newspaper, “The civilian business community does not understand military service skills and how to translate them. But they want to.”

Business education can help those with a military background segue into the business world, by equipping them with the means to see how the skills from their previous career can be utilized in a different context. Simply put, an MBA teaches you to speak the language of business.

After years, or even decades in leadership positions, today’s veterans have considerable professional experience – which is very applicable to the business world. A military background, therefore, means that they are often well-prepared for management roles. Despite this, hiring executives are often skeptical and wonder how frontline experience translates to the front office.

To help uncover the challenges and advantages of an MBA education for a veteran, we spoke with Major Grégori Bassaud, who at the time of writing, was pursuing an International MBA (IMBA) at EMLYON Business School in France.

Being a veteran can mean management experience

A married 43-year-old father of two young children, Bassaud is a career officer. He spent 21 years in the French marine corps. His service was primarily spent in airborne units where he rose up the ranks as a platoon leader, a company commander and finally as a staff officer (deputy chief ops in his battalion). He’s been deployed abroad several times, including one-year tours in French Guyana and two-year tours in Réunion Island and Martinique. A skydive specialist, Bassuad has 600 freefall jumps to his name and has been awarded the National Order of Service Merit.

During his time at EMLYON, Bassaud has been impressed with the school’s lecturers, particularly with “their in-depth knowledge in their respective fields; their ability to make it simple whatever the difficulties may be.” He notes that he considered alternative graduate degrees which were less expensive than an MBA, but in the end was convinced that the return on investment would make it worthwhile. “The advantages include relevant events like the career forum, with more than 300 companies, regular testimonies from alumni through the IMBA mentoring program, which gives you access to people holding great positions. Being at EMLYON is already being in business, already being in a professional environment where you learn everyday through the context alone.”

What advantages do you think people with a military background have when they pursue an MBA?

Seniority and maturity, which offer two advantages. First real management experience: the average age of my cohort is barely 30. Only a few of my classmates have real management experience and even that is very limited—they only managed four to five people; I had to manage more than 200.

Secondly, both of your feet are on the ground. When you have gained professional experience in more than 15 countries, worked with a huge and various range of stakeholders – belligerents, allies from various countries, NGOs, diplomats, politicians, religious representatives – you have fewer certainties than your classmates. Your approach to case studies is more careful and exhaustive, you pay more attention to the details and your judgement is often rather softer than your colleagues’ – which might not be what people expect from those who’ve served in the military.

Why do you think people with a military background should consider earning an MBA?

A military background can be useful in terms of soft skills, but you also have to take into consideration your weaknesses when it comes to hard skills such as accounting, finance, marketing, and corporate strategy. Although an MBA does not provide deep insight into all of these fields, except strategy, the very broad range of topics covered gives you the sufficient tools to successfully take up your targeted position.

You should not ignore the benefit of spending a year with people younger than you when pursuing a full-time MBA. Despite their limited background, they have already gained interesting experiences and they are up-to-date, always aware of the latest technology, the latest apps, the latest online tools, etc. A year with them is an accelerated course of training in the latest trends.

How do you think networking is different for someone with a military background?

MBAs are not as widely acknowledged by employers in France as they might be elsewhere, on top of which companies can be hesitant when dealing with candidates with atypical profiles. Even companies that are aware of MBAs expect a classic career path—for instance, an engineering degree followed by an initial professional experience, then an MBA. When coming from the army, networking is much more complicated. You have to rely more on the network of former military personnel who made the switch than on the school’s alumni network. Due to this additional difficulty, having the intensive support of your career services office is useful.

After adhering to a regimented military timetable, how do you handle the challenges of attending study and social functions that happen in the late evening?

As a matter of fact, veterans are used to extended shifts. Being accustomed to early morning hours makes your life easier. You are always on time. Many of your classmates are not, despite regular warnings by the faculty. The main challenge is combining the workload with your family life, which is definitely a huge challenge. Only 10% of my classmates have children. The pace of the course is definitely set for monks, or at least for people with total freedom.

Studies suggest that people who are physically fit are also more successful in their careers. If this is true – do you think it’s another advantage for a military person?

The first thing to point out is not all military veterans remain physically fit. However, in my case, some of my classmates were surprised that I was so physically fit for my age. I also had a comparable feedback from a headhunter, telling me that it presented a good image. So I agree that it is a kind of presentation skill.

Source: topmba.com

Pursuing a STEM Degree = More Money on Your GI Bill

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Attention STEM scholars! The United States Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) has launched the Edith Nourse Rogers STEM Scholarship program for students training in high demand STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) fields.

The Rogers STEM scholarship will provide up to nine months of additional Post 9-11 GI Bill benefits (to a maximum of $30,000) to qualifying veterans and Fry Scholars seeking an undergraduate STEM degree, or who have earned a STEM degree and are seeking a teaching certification.

Who is eligible for the Rogers STEM Scholarship?

  • You are pursuing a degree in a STEM field
  • You have completed at least 60 standard or 90 quarter credit hours toward your degree.
  • You will or will soon (within 90 days of application) exhaust your entitlement for the Post 9/11 GI Bill program
  • Your post-secondary degree requires at least 120 semester (or 180 quarter) credit for completion in a standard, undergraduate college degree
  • You have earned a post-secondary degree in a STEM field
  • You have been accepted or are enrolled in a teaching certification program
  • More you should know

  • Priority will be given to individuals who are entitled to 100 percent of Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits and to those who require the most credit hours.
  • The Yellow Ribbon Program may not be used with this extension. Schools may apply Yellow Ribbonn funding, but VA can’t match it.
  • These additional benefits can’t be transferred to dependents.
  • Fry scholars are eligible to apply for the Rogers STEM Scholarship.

    What fields of study qualify for the STEM Scholarship?

  • Students must be enrolled in or have earned a degree in one of the following areas:
  • Agriculture science or natural resources science program
  • Biological or biomedical science
  • Computer and information science and support services
  • Engineering, engineering technologies, or an engineering-related field
  • Health care or related program
  • Mathematics or statistics
  • Medical residency
  • Physical science
  • Science technologies or technicians
  • How do you apply?

    Apply on VA.gov

    Source: benefits.va.gov

    The National WWII Museum Turns 20 and Commemorates D-Day

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    On June 6, 2020, The National WWII Museum will celebrate its 20th birthday and commemorate the 76th anniversary of D-Day.

    To honor both events, the museum will be open to visitors, but to adhere to social distancing guidelines, they will hold all of the day’s activities online.

    The day will be filled with an array of digital events such as  a social media scavenger hunt, educational talks, and a screening of a new documentary that will go over the museum’s history. For those wishing to attend the museum physically, the museum will be open at normal business hours.

    Click here for the museum’s Facebook page where all of the live events will be taking place.

    Check out what events will be transpiring within the next few days:

    Live D-Day Veteran Conversation: Friday, June 5 from 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (CT)

    The Museum’s mission is built upon its collection of oral histories–these are the people we’re committed to remembering, and getting to share their accounts with our audience puts a deeply personal spin on the Museum experience. Join Curator of Oral History Joey Balfour as he discusses the Normandy landings with a veteran who experienced the invasion firsthand. Dr. Hal Baumgarten D-Day Commemoration Ceremony Saturday, June 6 11:00 a.m. (CT) Presented in memory of D-Day veteran and Museum friend Dr. Harold “Hal” Baumgarten, this commemoration ceremony will mark the 76th anniversary of the D-Day invasion with a solemn remembrance of the events of June 6, 1944, and conclude with a moment of silence. The Dr. Hal Baumgarten D-Day Commemoration Endowment, made possible by the generous gift of Karen and Leopold Sher, ensures that Dr. Baumgarten’s legacy will live on in perpetuity and helps the Museum fulfill its mission to educate future generations about the events of World War II and its lasting impact.

    Celebrating 20 Years: The National WWII Museum Saturday, June 6 at 1:00 p.m. (CT)

    Boysie Bollinger, longtime Museum Trustee and one of the its biggest champions, together with the Museum’s Founding President & CEO Emeritus Gordon H. “Nick” Mueller, PhD, and current President & CEO Stephen Watson, will reminisce about what it was like to be a part of the grand opening festivities on June 6, 2000; how WWII history has become a larger part of the nation’s fabric, spurring the expansion of The National WWII Museum; and the Museum’s continued transformation into one of the premier cultural and educational institutions in the world. D-Day at The National WWII Museum

    Saturday, June 6 from 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. (CT)

    The National WWII Museum will be open to the public for normal business hours on our 20th anniversary. Special features for the day include independent family activities, a Social Media Scavenger Hunt, and the premiere of a short documentary celebrating the Museum’s 20th anniversary. Purchase your tickets here!

    Tips for Military Veterans Going Back to School

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    With one semester ending and another school year approaching, many active and former military personnel might be considering how to best use their education benefits.

    No matter what area of study you decide to pursue, going back to school can be difficult to manage, even if the benefits are extraordinary.
     
    Here are the best tips on how to successfully transition from military life to college life:
     

    • Have a Plan and a Back-Up Plan
      1. Most college campuses have an abundance of majors and areas of study, but which one is going to work best for you, your interests, and your schedule? Before you step foot on campus, contact an academic advisor to find out more about the programs you’re interested in. What have past students in your field done after graduation? Is this the best place to receive my degree in this field? How do the professors teach and what are the time slots for these classes? You want to make sure you are able to pursue your degree that will best suit your needs in a way that is as stress free as possible. Creating a back-up plan is also helpful in the event that you decide to switch majors, or the program isn’t as incredible as it was made out to be.
    • Develop a Good Study Schedule
      1. In the military, you are taught to learn quickly and on a schedule. If this is the method you have become accustomed to, then it can be an easy transfer to study skills. Scheduling how long you study, break times, and how much material you are going to recover are all great ways to get the most out of your study time. However, remember that not all people study the same. How were you best able to learn and succeed while in the military, and how can this be transferred to your classes?
    • Stay Organized
      1. This may seem self-explanatory, but the way that you kept your space tidy and clean in the military is the same way you should keep your workspace clean. Keeping a clean workspace not only allows for students to easily locate all of their study materials, but it also limits messy distractions and increases concentration.
    • Use Your Resources
      1. One of the most amazing things about universities is the abundance of resources you have. Tutors, libraries and career counselors can help you in your study habits, but schools also provide medical facilities, access to therapy, gyms, and veteran-specific support groups that can all aide in personal endeavors and mental health.
    • Communicate
      1. In the end, you and your classmates have quite a bit in common—you both want to graduate. Working on a team to study, much like how military personnel work on teams to accomplish tasks, can be highly effective in schoolwork as well as utilizing office hours, academic counseling, and even school clubs. Getting involved with your new college community will provide new opportunities to learn, study, make friends, release stress and enjoy socialization, all of which help your academic and personal lives.

    Need Money for Higher Education?

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    Don’t think you can afford college? Think again. In addition to military tuition assistance and Department of Veterans Affairs education programs, numerous loans and opportunities are available to help you fund the next step in your education.

    Federal grants and loans

    Check out these grants and loans to help cover education expenses:

    • Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, is the required application from the Department of Education. It determines your eligibility for any form of federal financial aid. Federal Pell Grants, unlike loans, do not have to be repaid. The grant is typically awarded to an undergraduate student who has not yet earned a bachelor’s or professional degree. In some cases, a student enrolled in a post-bachelor’s teacher certificate program may receive a Pell Grant.
    • Direct Stafford Loans are low-interest loans to help cover the cost of higher education at a four-year college or university, community college, or a trade, career or technical school.
    • PLUS loans are federal loans that eligible graduate or professional degree students and parents of dependent undergraduate students can use to help pay for education expenses.
    • Federal Perkins Loans are low-interest loans for both undergraduate and graduate students with exceptional financial need.
    • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunities Grant Program, or FSEOG, provides need-based grants to help low-income undergraduate students finance the cost of higher education. Priority is given to recipients of the Federal Pell Grant.

    Colleges and universities

    More than 2,600 colleges and universities worldwide offer educational opportunities to military members. Service Members Opportunity Colleges, or SOC, a group of more than 1,900 postsecondary schools, provides opportunities to service members and their families to complete college degrees as they live the mobile military life.

    Here are some useful resources to help you plan your postsecondary education:

    • TA DECIDE, a new Department of Defense tool, allows you to compare information about education institutions and costs.
    • Financial Aid Shopping Sheet helps you compare higher education institutions to make informed decisions about where to attend school.
    • GI Bill® Comparison Tool helps you compare Veterans Affairs-approved institutions and review other information to choose the education program that works best for you.
    • College Navigator provides a search feature, builds a list of schools for comparison and pinpoints school locations to help you make the best decision about your postsecondary education.

    Source: militaryonesource.mil

    Raytheon establishes $20,000 SPY-6 scholarship for US Navy student veterans

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    Raytheon Company, in partnership with Student Veterans of America, is offering two U.S. Navy student veterans $10,000 each in scholarships under a new program announced during the Surface Navy Association’s 32nd National Symposium.

    Applications for the scholarship grants are accepted on the SVA website from January 15, 2020April 1, 2020.

    The Raytheon SPY-6 Scholarship, named for the U.S. Navy’s SPY-6 Family of Radars, provides returning sailors an opportunity to achieve educational goals and position themselves for success in civilian professions. The scholarships will be awarded to sailors who pursue an undergraduate or graduate degree at an accredited university and demonstrate leadership in their local community.

    “Investment in our student veterans – the future leaders of our industry – provides opportunity to gain unique experience, product knowledge and customer-centric insights that protect our service men and women around the world,” said Paul Ferraro, vice president of Raytheon’s Seapower Capability Systems business. “Our SPY-6 scholarship rewards Navy student veterans who exhibit superior academic achievement and are leaders on campus and in their communities.”

    The Raytheon SPY-6 Scholarship is the latest initiative as part of Raytheon and SVA’s $5 million multi-year partnership to provide military veterans the resources, support and advocacy needed to succeed in higher education.

    About Raytheon
    Raytheon Company, with 2018 sales of $27 billion and 67,000 employees, is a technology and innovation leader specializing in defense, civil government and cybersecurity solutions. With a history of innovation spanning 97 years, Raytheon provides state-of-the-art electronics, mission systems integration, C5I® products and services, sensing, and mission support for customers in more than 80 countries. Raytheon is headquartered in Waltham, Massachusetts. Follow us on Twitter.

    About Student Veterans of America 
    With a focused mission on empowering student veterans, SVA is committed to providing an educational experience that goes beyond the classroom. Through a dedicated network of more than 1,500 on-campus chapters in all 50 states and 4 countries representing more than 750,000 student veterans, SVA aims to inspire yesterday’s warriors by connecting student veterans with a community of like-minded chapter leaders. Every day these passionate leaders work to provide the necessary resources, network support, and advocacy to ensure student veterans can effectively connect, expand their skills, and ultimately achieve their greatest potential. For more information, visit us at www.studentveterans.org.

    Stay in the know: The VA’s 2020 Yellow Ribbon Schools

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    The Yellow Ribbon GI Education Enhancement Program (Yellow Ribbon Program) is a provision of the Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008.

    This program allows institutions of higher learning (degree granting institutions) in the United States to voluntarily enter into an agreement with VA to fund tuition expenses that exceed either the annual maximum cap for private institutions or the resident tuition and fees for a public institution.

    The institution can contribute up to 50 percent of those expenses, and VA will match the same amount as the institution.

    To view a list of the Department of Veterans Affairs schools on College Recon, Click here.

    Post-9/11 GI Bill Yellow Ribbon FAQs

    What is the Yellow Ribbon Program? How will it benefit me?

    The Yellow Ribbon Program is a provision of the law that created the Post-9/11 GI Bill. The Yellow Ribbon Program is available for Institutions of Higher Learning (degree granting institutions) in the United States or at a branch of such institution located outside the United States. The program allows approved institutions of higher learning and the VA to partially or fully fund tuition and fee expenses that exceed the established thresholds under the Post-9/11 GI Bill.

    If I am eligible for the Post‐9/11 GI Bill, am I automatically eligible for the Yellow Ribbon Program?

    No. Only Veterans (or dependents under Transfer of Entitlement) at the 100 percent benefit level qualify. Active duty members and spouses thereof are not eligible for this program. In addition, the institution must be approved to participate in the program, and you must apply to the school.

    How do I know whether the school I want to attend participates in the Yellow Ribbon Program?

    More information about the program and the lists of participating Yellow Ribbon schools are posted on the GI Bill website at https://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill/yellow_ribbon.asp

    If the school I plan to attend participates in the program, can I count on being in the program?

    No. The school’s agreement with the VA may limit the number of participants in the program and is determined on a first-come, first-served basis. You must apply to the school. The school will notify each student accepted into the Yellow Ribbon Program.

    If the school I plan to attend participates in the program, do all participants receive the same amount of Yellow Ribbon Program benefits?

    Not necessarily. Schools have the flexibility to designate the number of students and contributions based on student status (undergraduate, graduate, doctoral) and college or professional school. For example, the school could specify $1,000 for undergraduates, $1,500 for graduate students and $2,000 for doctoral students. The school also could specify $1,800 for students in the school of engineering and $2,500 for students in the school of nursing.

    If I participate in the Yellow Ribbon Program this year, will I automatically be in the program next year?

    Not necessarily. Yellow Ribbon Program agreements must be in effect for each year. A school with an approved agreement with VA must continue to offer it to you in subsequent years as long as the following conditions apply:

    • The school continues to participate in the program
    • You maintain satisfactory progress towards completion of your program
    • You remain continuously enrolled (per school’s policy)
    • You have remaining entitlement under the Post‐9/11 GI Bill

    If you transfer to another school, the new school would have to participate in the program and accept your application; the first school’s decision has no bearing on the second school.

    If I participate in the Yellow Ribbon Program this year, will I automatically be guaranteed the same matching contributions from the school and VA for subsequent years (provided the above conditions still apply)?

    No. The school may choose to contribute a different amount for subsequent years.

    Will all of my tuition and fees be paid for if my school participates in the Yellow Ribbon Program?

    Not necessarily. The school’s agreement with the VA specifies an amount the school will contribute (and VA will match) to make up all or part of the difference between what the Post-9/11 GI Bill will pay and the unmet tuition and fees charges. In addition, the school’s agreement with the VA may specify only certain colleges and/or professional schools, and/or undergraduate, graduate, or doctoral level programs. The list of schools on the website will include specific information on each school’s agreement with VA.

    What happens when a portion of my tuition and fees is already met through state or institutional waivers?

    The amount of tuition and fees charged, minus any aid specifically designated for the sole purpose of defraying tuition and fees, will be used to determine the amount payable under the Post-9/11 GI Bill. The unmet charges may be covered in part or entirely through equal Yellow Ribbon Program contributions from the school and VA.

    What fees will be covered by Yellow Ribbon Program funds?

    All mandatory fees for a student’s program of education may be included. Any fees that are not mandatory, such as room and board, study abroad (unless the study abroad course is a requirement for the degree program), and penalty fees (such as late registration, return check fees, and parking fines) cannot be included. These fees are not payable under the Yellow Ribbon Program or under the Post-9/11 GI Bill.

    Do I have to attend full time to be in the Yellow Ribbon Program?

    No. You do not have to attend full time.

    How will I know for sure that I am eligible for the Yellow Ribbon Program? What is the process to apply?

    If you submit an application for the Post-9/11 GI Bill to VA and are eligible at the 100 percent benefit level, VA will issue you a Certificate of Eligibility advising you are potentially eligible for the Yellow Ribbon Program. You should provide your Certificate of Eligibility to the school, which in turn will determine if there are slots available for the Yellow Ribbon Program (based on its agreement with the VA).

    If your school has already sent us an enrollment certification, and it is processed at the same time as your application, your award letter will also display your benefit level. The school is responsible for notifying you whether or not you are accepted and approved for the Yellow Ribbon Program. The school then submits an enrollment form to VA, certifying information that is used to make payment to the school for tuition and fees and for Yellow Ribbon Program payments.

    How would I know if the school I am attending would discontinue its participation in the Yellow Ribbon Program for subsequent years?

    The school must inform its students of discontinued participation.

    Can I receive Yellow Ribbon Program funds for the summer term?

    Yes, if the school still has Yellow Ribbon Program funds available for the per‐student maximum contribution for summer term.

    If I reduce my course load, how will my payments change?

    The contributions from the school and VA would be reduced. Refunds are based on the school’s refund policy, and you would be liable to VA for any resulting overpayments.

    If I leave my school but return after a semester, am I still approved for the Yellow Ribbon Program?

    The school must continue to offer the Yellow Ribbon Program to you provided that the school continues to participate in the program, you maintain satisfactory progress, and you remain continuously enrolled. The definition of continuous enrollment is dictated by the school’s policy and determines your continued eligibility for the Yellow Ribbon Program.

    Source: va.gov

    Maximize Your Education Benefits

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    Don’t waste one of the greatest benefits of military service: a college education. Use these tips to get started and to make the most of the educational benefits you earned.

    Ask How, What, Where

    You’re now out of the military and want to attend school on the GI Bill. Where do you go? Ask yourself three questions when deciding on a school: 

    How will you attend school: on campus or online? Evaluate your employment schedule, family circumstances and a commute. You might have to relocate to be close to a university campus. Some traditional universities have begun offering online degrees, and many for-profit institutions specialize in online education. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of taking classes online , and pick a method of learning that best suits your lifestyle.

    What do you want to study? This question should help narrow down where you want to get an education. Schools offer different kinds of programs, degrees and certificates, and not all are equal. Some value programs over others or have particularly strong departments. Identify what you want to study early so you can save credits by not changing degree plans in the future.  

    Where do you want to be when you graduate? In the competitive job market, where you went to school may help or hinder your chances at employment. A degree from a private school in one state might be prestigious in its borders but overlooked elsewhere. Choosing a nationally recognized school can help when employers evaluate your educational background.

    1. The GI Bill as an Investment

    The GI Bill does not last forever. You are granted 36 academic months to finish your degree plan—whether it’s to get a certificate, undergraduate, or graduate degree. The bill comes to you on behalf of taxpayers, but it’s not free and should not be wasted. Many people change majors in the course of their life, but it’s a risk when it comes to the GI Bill. There is not much room to adjust and take different classes once your basics are out of the way. Weigh your different degree options and make your decision before taking major-centric courses. Doing so will minimize the risk of exhausting benefits and paying out of pocket for the rest of your classes.

    Be prepared to research the quality of education offered by the school you want to attend. While Veterans usually don’t need federal student loans while using the GI Bill, default rates of individual schools can help indicate the ability to secure a job that pays high enough to pay down loans. The Department of Education’s National Center of Education Statistics utilizes a school search directory to evaluate schools on these grounds. Look up schools you’re interested in and find out how graduates fare after they walk the stage.

    1. Anticipate the Unpredictable Job Landscape

    Another reason to take post-military education seriously is the unforgiving job market. Veterans leaving the service after deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan—those most able to take advantage of education benefits—face a disproportional amount of unemployment compared to civilians. Veterans face a civilian workforce that doesn’t understand their skills and worries about the burden of traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress. And according to a VA-sponsored study, Vets often earn less than their civilian counterparts, even with degrees in hand. The takeaway is this: Veterans already enter the workforce at a disadvantage, so make your education bullet point on your résumé stand out just as much as your military experience.

    1. Trust, but Verify

    Schools will always welcome your dollars, whether you pay them through loans, scholarships or GI Bill tuition. Unfortunately, some schools use aggressive and questionable practices to enroll students and deliberately exaggerate the earning potential of degrees earned. Resources like Payscale can help determine earning power right out of school and break down how much you stand to make depending on the type of college you attend: public, private, and for-profit. If an enrollment adviser says you will make big money after graduating, think back to the used car lots that litter the roads outside of military bases. They might be selling the equivalent of a car with 200,000 miles for a low interest rate of 18 percent.

    1. Beware of Questionable Research Aids

    Go to Google and search for “GI Bill schools.” The first link you get isn’t a page run by the Department of Veterans Affairs. The first result is GIBill.com, and it uses the name of the most recognized public education program in existence to its financial benefit. It appears to be a legitimate site for information, but a cursory search of its privacy policy shows it is owned by an online marketing firm that, according to a major business publication, specializes in directing students to for-profit schools through its page. It’s a questionable marketing strategy that seeks to legitimize a page that serves little purpose other than to funnel student Veterans and convince them their options for education are limited to their advertisers. There are 6,500 schools across the country that allow GI Bill benefits; only use VA’s school locator to find qualifying programs. Avoid suspicious websites drowning in advertisements.

    1. Reintegration is Key

    The challenges of schoolwork paled in comparison to the difficulties of finding footing in an unfamiliar civilian world—it can take only a few classes to start to realize you can be a changed person after service. As painful as it was, the reintegration process can expose you to different people and ideas that can put you on a path to feeling normal again. For many Veterans, education after the military acts as a first exposure to college and the first challenge of reintegration. Therefore, the campus becomes training wheels for the professional world and allows you time to comfortably adjust to the slower pace of civilian life. If you’re undecided between a physical campus and an online school, consider the benefits of surrounding yourself with other students before you enroll.

    Do What’s Best for You

    The quality of education a Veteran receives with his or her benefits is a serious matter that can’t be taken lightly, and it is with these tips that we hope Veterans can fully maximize their hard-earned benefits. The GI Bill is a return on an investment that was measured in sweat and blood, often drained on foreign soil. Make it count.

    Source: va.gov

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